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Mind Phantom

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Reply with quote  #1 
If you knew someone that was brand new to magic, what three tips of advice would you give them if asked?

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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #2 
Study, practice, perform. Rinse and repeat.

But seriously, I think tip number one would be to focus on sleight of hand rather than chase satisfaction through one-off tricks and such. Number two would be to take advantage of both online video instruction and books. Online vids primarily for moves and sleights, books for tricks and history. And three, be true to yourself. Follow your magic muse wherever it may lead you; add your own unique signature to the performance of magic. Make it yours.

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Bmat

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Reply with quote  #3 
buy something easy with instant gratification.  A svengali deck, nickles to dimes.  Take a half an hour learn it and start performing now. too many become arm chair magicians, insist on practicing until something is perfect, which it cannot be until one starts to perform it but now they have gotten into the idea that it has to be perfect so they never perform.  But with a svenagli deck?  easy to show family or friends,.  Then when you have exhuasted your friends and family and you kinda understand what its about.  Buy the book, 50 tricks with a svengali deck.  Get a penetration frame.  A basic book on card Magic, Karl Fulves or something.  Then...a thumb tip maybe a plastic set of cups and balls, Mark Wilsons course in magic.  and grow from there. 

Magic is like anything else, most people need that instant rush.  If you start with sleigh of hand, take a month to learn something and practice and practice.  It is going to get tired...fast.   

I used to teach horse back riding at a summer camp.  The initial thought is to teach the kids about horses, about tack, get them to brush a horse and make that connection first.   Wrong.  First day have that horse saddled up and ready to go.  Kids arrive put them on the horse and get them moving.   Take that lead horse have the rest follow, have them trott.  Let them have fun.  Don't lecture about all the do's and dont's.  Nothing drives one away faster than a bunch of instruction right off the bat.  Then once they have a taste.   And magic is very addictive...then you have them.  Then the work starts.  Nothing gets an enthusiast into the thick of it than going out and performing a svengali deck for the first few times and your friends and family want to see more.  It forces them deeper into the art.  Each little easy step leads to the next.  Done right soon they want, need, crave to dig deeper.

How many of us started with a magic kit right out of the box?  I've talked to lots of magicians and most started that way.  They didn't start with the slight of hand.  No they started with a ball and vase.

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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #4 
      I wrote THE MAGIC BOOK just for you!
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #5 
Bmat, the OP asked what advice "you" would give a newbie. I'd stick with sleight of hand as my number one bit of advice. Why? Because sleight of hand is enduring. It is the foundation of closeup magic. While I have no problem with one-off tricks or magic set - it was T.V. Magic Cards that gave me the itch, after all - in retrospect I would have preferred someone demonstrate the possibilities with sleight of hand and assured me that its pursuit was ultimately worth the time and effort. And as for The Magic Book?! Man, if I'd have had a copy of that right after T.V. Magic Cards piqued my curiosity I'd have been in heaven.

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chris w

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Reply with quote  #6 

Not advice, per se, but I'd want to:

1. Ask questions. Get a sense of their personality and life circumstances. Listen to what their interests are before dispensing the same all-purpose advice I'd give anyone else. Make a connection, which will be as important as anything I might say.

2. Show two tricks, one simple enough to learn on the spot and one aspirational (not taught).

3. Suggest appropriate resources, whether a local shop, solid beginner book in line with their interests/personality, inspiring performance clip to look up on YouTube, etc.

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Magicman425

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Reply with quote  #7 
STOP, LOOK AND LISTEN!

STOP.....Slow down....Don't be in a rush.

LOOK....for you local IBM, SAM or other magic club and join

LISTEN....To the wisdom of those more experienced.

Get a Copy of "The Magic Book" By Harry Lorayne, The "Mark Wilson Course" and "The Royal Road to Card Magic"


And Finally The 3 Golden rules.....

1. PRACTICE!

2. PRACTICE!

3. PRACTICE!




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arthur stead

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Reply with quote  #8 
Then, after all that reading and practicing, if you find you've developed a real affinity for magic, study misdirection.
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Reply with quote  #9 

1. Whatever you do, make it entertaining. You can perform the oldest trick in the book, and you can perform it BADLY, but just so long as you make it ENTERTAINING, people will love it. Think of yourself not as a magician or just a magician, but as an ENTERTAINER first and formost. 

2. Explore, better yet, CREATE alternative methods for performing the tricks you learn; preferably methods you don't think anyone else has ever done. Make it your own. 

3. NEVER ever reveal the secret of how it's done, no matter how badly you may want to. Be prepared to keep a lot of secrets; loose lips sink ships, and destroy magic. 

 

PS: I left out studying/practicing and performing because I felt it kind of goes without saying; even someone brand new to magic understands that practice will be in order.

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Reply with quote  #10 
1. Understand there are no 'Rules' or 'Laws in the conjuring arts (Magic, Mentalism etc) and performing

2. Practice/Perform: these go together because hours of practice without actual experience is futile, likewise, performing without knowledge of yourself, movements, actions, techniques etc is equally as futile 

3.  Understand who you are  and how that translates into performing, and be an INDIVIDUAL a character is one thing, becoming a "fake" a parody of yourself, or the antithesis of "what" you are is a slow self-death

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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #11 
The first thing would be to always be learning. Can never learn too much.

Start with easy stuff. Sleight of hand can be daunting. Some give up because of that. If you start with easy stuff you can get that thrill of performing for people.

When learning sleight of hand, understand that moves are not magic, but simply a means to an end.



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arthur stead

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Reply with quote  #12 
Michaelblue is correct.  Once you stop learning, you stagnate.
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Dave Campbell

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Reply with quote  #13 
Boy... almost hate to come in with a music-related comment on the heels of Arthur Stead but here goes 😉

When I was playing music for a living, I'd get into a rut where it was pretty much the same stuff every night, and I'd start to feel myself getting bored...

A new-comer to magic might feel this way just starting out doing just a few things they know over and over, or someone that performs a set show night after night similar to the musical gigs.

What kicked it for me was the 'keep learning' that was mentioned.

Find another book of new material, or a new artist (magician), or in the case of music for me, find some intricate piano score and try to get it worked out on guitar. Anything to get the creative juices to kick in.

So back to the beginner -- whatever book works for that person...it may take a couple to find one that really 'clicks' because what some of us like others don't, and what we didn't like 30 years ago might be eye-opening now. But also have something to "do" … something that can be accomplished and make him/her smile when it's completed, to feel the sense of accomplishing something.

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