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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #1 
So since this is a new forum, I would be interested to know how many of you are more interested in coin magic than other types of magic. I don't see a lot of coin workers in my neck of the woods ( or I just haven't met them yet) and at the magic shop I frequent it seems that most are more interested in cards than coins. Is there anyone out there as obsessed with coin magic as I am?
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Robert, Im in your neck of the woods ; ) Coin magic was my first love way back when.
Im not as coin crazy as I used to be, but I still enjoy it.
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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Robert,

I only perform three coin tricks...

Coin under watch
Double Deception by Mark Mason
Dave Williamson's Floating Matrix from Sleight of Dave 1

I'm not sure why I never got infected by the coin magic bug.

I think that I mistakenly came to believe that you can do more with cards than coins.

Maybe you can help change my mind.

Thanks for posting your question!

Rudy

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Waterman

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Reply with quote  #4 
In the past few years I have started to kindle more appreciation for coin workers. When I first moved to Oregon, Reed McClintock lived a few blocks from me. Hanging out with him was inspirational not just for the coin work he is famous for, but his overall approach and performance of all types of magic was infectious.

I have spent the past year looking at various matrixes and  routines with both gaffed and regular coins. I rarely do any coin stuff at paid gigs, but when I do it's always Steve Duschek's, "Lethal Tender".
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Gerald Deutsch

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Reply with quote  #5 
When I want to do something quick it will be a coin effect.

Some that come to mind are:

1 Borrow a penny, put it in the spectator's hand, snap your fingers and the penny is a dime. you let her keep the dime.

2 Borrow a quarter and it multiples to five - you let her keep all. (If the stock market keeps falling I'll do this with nickels.)

3 You take a cell phone from the spectator and ask:

“Oh does that cell phone have the “quarter app”? 

 

You’re curious so you take their phone in your right hand by its sides between your fingers and thumb and tell the spectator to hold out his – or her – hand.  He or she does.

 

You hold the cell phone over the outstretched hand and your left hand taps the top of the phone and a quarter falls into the spectator’s hand.

 

“Oh it does. Isn’t it a great app?” you say as you walk away putting the cell on top of the quarter in the open hand.

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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waterman
In the past few years I have started to kindle more appreciation for coin workers. When I first moved to Oregon, Reed McClintock lived a few blocks from me. Hanging out with him was inspirational not just for the coin work he is famous for, but his overall approach and performance of all types of magic was infectious.

I have spent the past year looking at various matrixes and  routines with both gaffed and regular coins. I rarely do any coin stuff at paid gigs, but when I do it's always Steve Duschek's, "Lethal Tender".
Dan, is that what you showed me at McMenamins? If so..it's incredible!

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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerald Deutsch
When I want to do something quick it will be a coin effect.

Some that come to mind are:

1 Borrow a penny, put it in the spectator's hand, snap your fingers and the penny is a dime. you let her keep the dime.

2 Borrow a quarter and it multiples to five - you let her keep all. (If the stock market keeps falling I'll do this with nickels.)

3 You take a cell phone from the spectator and ask:

“Oh does that cell phone have the “quarter app”? 

 

You’re curious so you take their phone in your right hand by its sides between your fingers and thumb and tell the spectator to hold out his – or her – hand.  He or she does.

 

You hold the cell phone over the outstretched hand and your left hand taps the top of the phone and a quarter falls into the spectator’s hand.

 

“Oh it does. Isn’t it a great app?” you say as you walk away putting the cell on top of the quarter in the open hand.

 

Wow! Gerald Deutsch. The man who studied under Slydini and has contributed several items that appear in Harry Lorayne's Apocalypse and BOF's, is here at the Magician's Forum and sharing his magic.

What an honor!

Thanks again for joining us!

Rudy

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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #8 
Wow Gerald, excuse my ignorance for not knowing who you were but you studied under Slydini?? I'm in awe sir. I bet you have some tales to tell!

, I do love tricks using everyday money like dimes and pennies, however, I must admit I do love to sling around half dollars. The only problem however, here in Canada I sometimes get funny looks as we don't have those coins 'round these parts. So I have now changed my routine to always introduce the half dollars and explain why I use them. I explain that they're aesthetically pleasing to the eye, real silver antiques...and most of all, they posess properties most coins don't have...then I go into my routine. I decided to do a little something for a kid on the commuter train one day on the way to work and he was convinced the coins were trick coins simply because he hadn't seen them before. I even let him examine them but he still wasn't entirely convinced! Lesson learned I guess [smile]

I actually just purchased the digital version of Harry Lorrayne's Apocolypse 1998 I believe it was. Is there anything in that year you might have in there Gerald?
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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #9 
I don't do many coin tricks. 

One that I do perform uses a coin board, aka magic panel board along with a few other names. 
The coin board is an old forgotten prop. I discovered it and liked it so much, I wrote a book on it. 
But, I only have a few left so don't think of this as a sales pitch, it's not. 

Other coin tricks I would do are Coins Through Table,,, the 2 coin sequence that Slydini does. 

I also perform Scotch and Soda - but who doesn't? 

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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rudytinoco
Hi Robert,

I only perform three coin tricks...

Coin under watch
Double Deception by Mark Mason
Dave Williamson's Floating Matrix from Sleight of Dave 1

I'm not sure why I never got infected by the coin magic bug.

I think that I mistakenly came to believe that you can do more with cards than coins.

Maybe you can help change my mind.

Thanks for posting your question!

Rudy


Yeah I think my coin magic fascination started because the first magic book I really got into was Introduction to Coin Magic by Futagawa. One of the best books on coin magic next to Bobos in my humble opinion.. From there it was Bobos and that was it. I think I was a bit intimidated by cards. My hands are fairly small so a lot of the sleights were tough for me. Although a great email a few years back from Lee Asher set me straight about that. His hands are small and his card work is fantastic. He even went so far as to send me an actual size scan of his hand to show just how small they were! Needless to say I felt a bit sheepish. Still, coin magic was my first love and that's where my heart lies [smile] I would encourage you to try adding a few coin routines to your repertoire. I'm not sure if you've seen it but do a YouTube search for Salt and Silver by Giovanni Livera. One of the best coin routines out there, totally inspiring and a great lesson in misdirection.

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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #11 
Here's something that gets a good reaction. It's a stand up piece. I don't know the source. I happened to see a kid perform this at a magic convention back years ago.

Have our borrow a quarter. Show it in left palm. Pick it up with right hand then bend at waist. Place coin under your right shoe.

While still bent at the waist show your left hand empty, then your right. Your right hand points to your left shoe and you roll your ankle/foot to show nothing under it. Then you point to your right foot as you then show there is nothing under it either.

You stand up with your palms up and open. You then point to your face and show the coin held between your teeth.

Method: False pickup and display by the right hand. As you bend over at the waist, the left hand places coin in mouth. Everything else follows as described.
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eusbanger

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Reply with quote  #12 
I like coin magic, but I perform more card magic and mentalism.
Coin magic is more difficult for me and I have very little time so I really don't touch coins.

the only tricks I perform now is the brilliant one from Eugene Burger (can't remenber the name...), Imagination coins by garret thomas and a four fly by eric jones
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Barry Allen

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Reply with quote  #13 
Coins over cards each and every time (as opposed to coins under cards.....boom boom!).

The first routines I learnt were from Harry Lorayne's 'The Magic Book'. Bobo's tome came shortly thereafter.

I was fortunate enough to learn a lot from Bobby Bernard. As a youngster, he took me under his guidance during my trips to Hamleys. Luckily, it didn't cost anything, as my family couldn't have afforded private tuition anyway. My father knew Bobby from their association at a London Magic Club back in the 1950's; and once Bobby noticed that I listened to his wisdom AND practised, he was prepared to teach me so much.

Over the years, I have gone through the usual phases of buying numerous fakes. All of which have either been lost, spent or resold. That's apart from my folders - I truly deem the coin in bottle effect to be one of the greatest examples of seemingly impromptu magic on this earth (despite a myriad of newer methods). I also have a set of Victorian Pennies with an expanded she'll that have remained 'stayers'.

Other than these, I stick to coin magic with everyday normal coins rather than gaffs.

Coins to glass and the International Coin Trick (from Harry's booklet of Derek Dingle's work - Dingle's Deceptions) being my usual fayre; along with an Okito Box, with which I perform the Ken Brooke routine.

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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #14 
Barry, I agree that the simplest effects are some of the most effective. The coin in the bottle being one. I certainly do prefer to just use the coins themselves for the magic rather than gaffs, but there are some fabulous routines out there incorporating the 'dolphin' and the 'turtle' Dean Dill's Coin Explosion is one that still blows me away to watch. I've recently gone to Harry Lorayne's Apocolypse for how to do that effect as (to my knowledge) Dean never released a 'how-to' for that one. It's a tough one to pull off but man does it look great!

 Unfortunately I never had the pleasure of being trained by a mentor which I've always longed for, so I did learn some bad habits, however, but after greedily watching DVD's by  David Roth and Eric Jones I've since corrected some of those bad habit [smile] Days spent at the Browsers Den of Magic in Toronto have helped a lot as well. Thanks to Mahdi Gilbert for the confidence boosting!
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Jim McGowan

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Reply with quote  #15 
Robert, you don’t see as many of us because... coin magic is hard!!  Seriously though, with cards you have a lot of places to hide a card - 52 in a deck alone, plus the card box, your wallet, etc. However there aren't too many places to hide a coin from spectators, considering you use your hands alone for the most part. You can go to your pocket with cards, mainly because it is very unlikely you happen to have a pocket full of other cards there. Whereas as soon as you go to your pocket with a coin, well, we all have a handful of coins in our pockets. I can easily take six months to get a coin routine down well enough to perform it publicly; there cannot be the smallest flash of silver from between your fingers, you must not allow coins to touch each other because of the sound - unless you want that to be heard for a reason. And since you have such limited area within your hands to hide coins, spectators know this and burn your hands intensely, waiting for you to give everything away with one false move - even a tiny one!

However as difficult as coin magic can be, I find it immensely rewarding to be able to amaze a group of spectators - or even just one - with coins. Especially with their borrowed coins.

Jim

Oh, and ... Hi Barry! Hope all is well there! Take care!
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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #16 
You're absolutely right Jim. I find that if you do several coin effects in a row spectators start to look for your hand 'shapes' as it were then, as you say, burn your hands a lot. However I try to do effects that incorporate different sleights so the hand position changes. For instance, maybe doing a Mike Gallo style coins across in the hands which uses a lot of open hand shaped classic palming, followed by a three fly type effect which uses a lot of partially closed hand finger palming, then maybe an effect that uses a downs palm or edge grip. That might seem like silly reasoning but I believe it goes a long way to keeping everyone on their toes. Throwing a fast one coin routine in there seems to help keep them confused as well. But yes, coin magic IS hard! There are a whole slew of coin tricks I'd love to learn but am still too nervous simply because of the technicality of the moves.  It will happen from time to time but dropping a coin in the middle of a routine is the worst so sticking to routines with fewer and easier moves seems to keep the stress levels down [smile]
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #17 
      The very first magic item I ever had in print was a coin trick - in Hugard's Magic Monthly - 1952, I believe.

      I once did my coin-through-table routine at an S.A.M. meeting and - I'm gonna' brag a bit - Roy Benson said, "That's the best 4-coin-through-table trick I've ever seen!!" So, yeah, I'm basically a card guy, but I do/did some coin stuff. I once did a complete lecture on coin sleeving. You can see my handling of the Han Ping Chien coin move on Vol. 4 of my "Best Ever" 4-volume DVD set, some sleeving stuff (Cointrol, One-Hand Coin Vanish, Vanishing Dust) on Volume 2.
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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #18 
Is there any video of that coin through table trick you did Harry? I'd love to see that.
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #19 
Robert,

My number one magic "thing" is coins. I'm only new - into magic for just over a year. But the majority of that time was spent working on coin magic. I love it. I'm not really sure why. Possibly it is because the very first trick I learned was an Eric Jones one coin routine. Anyway. Yup - I'm a coin guy.

For my SAM audition, I did David Roth's "Hanging Coins." Except for the part where I dropped all the coins on the floor (:-P), it went over really well. My most satisfying moment though came after my first meeting there when I asked advice from the person who is sort of my sponsor and is a very experienced magician with a yearly gig at the Magic Castle, etc. I wanted to know if I was doiong the Tenkai Pennies correctly. He and his wife were completely baffled by the trick! When I showed him the Tenkai pinch, he said "Oh, that's beyond me." Granted, he is primarily a cups and balls guy. But that really gave me a big confidence boost.

Since then, I've been tutored, in cyberspace anyway, by some of my favorite coin magicians - Marion Boykin, Vinny Marini (The Godfather), and Michael Rubinstein, to name a few. MB has been so patient and helpful - even making videos just to help me understand certain things. 

BTW, probably my favorite on-the-go trick to do when someone says "do a trick for me" is MB's Crimp Change. I'll usually use two Morgan silver dollars - one "like new" shiny one, and one "soft" one that is very worn down and smooth. I usually show them the coin and explain how cool it is - so old and big and shiny - and then do the change with a wave of my hand, and just like that, the coin has aged into the worn down one. It takes about 15 seconds and has a huge impact.

Anyway, I will talk coin magic all day if you don't shut me up[smile].

Cheers!

Ken
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #20 
   Hi Robert: No, sorry, I never did put that coin-through-table routine on tape. Should have.
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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #21 
Ah, sorry to hear that Harry, that was probably something to see [smile]

Nice to meet you Ken! Good to see another magician so into coins. I do find, especially when I'm at the magic shop that most of the new younger magicians all seem to want to play with cards. Not a lot are into coins. There are a few, but it's always nice to talk to someone into coin magic as much as me [smile]
One of my favourite quick tricks to do is Michael Rubensteins spellbound routine. I've modified it slightly but it's pretty much his. It's fairly easy to do ( at the right angles) and it seems to get a good reaction.
I'm also a big fan of David Stones coin work. He's a great all around magician, and he readily admits that a lot of his tricks aren't his, but his execution and timing is near flawless. He's kind of what I aspire to. if you haven't heard of him I highly recommend looking up some of his videos on YouTube.

Nice to hear you getting some one on one tutoring from some of the bigger pros! I've never had the pleasure of having that type of teaching, but I'm always willing. Perhaps you could put me in touch with a couple of these guys.

Oh, and another coin trick I highly recommend you watching is Salt and Silver from Giovanni Livera. You can see the performance on YouTube. Fantastic trick and a great lesson in misdirection .
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Barry Allen

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Reply with quote  #22 
Harry - you are rightly admired for your superb contribution to the written word - in particular (magic-wise) the myriad of brilliant effects using cards. However, with the wealth of coin material spanning the 20 years of Apocolypse, I just wondered whether you'd ever considered releasing this within a seperate tome?

Suffice to say that your coin magic contribution within The Magic Book actually fuelled my particular preference for coins over the pasteboards.
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Spinooch81

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Reply with quote  #23 
I have been performing magic for a little while now and mostly did Children's magic for birthday parties. However, every time someone finds out that I am a magician, the first comment is: "Show me a trick!". Now, I usually try to have something on me but when I don't it is a VERY awkward moment. For that reason, I always wanted to get more involved with coins. Yes, there are lots of amazing tricks you can do with cards, but unless you have them in your pocket at all times, you aren't always ready to perform. I always have my wallet with bills or coins in my pocket so it is only logical that I learn coin magic. I have the standard fare of Bobo, Roth, Rubinstein, Jones etc. in my collection, but sometimes I feel overwhelmed with the amount of information available. I think I need to choose one, sit down with coins in hand and just work through it. Eric Jones' Metal series is probably where I will start and supplement with Bobo. Any suggestions?
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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #24 
Spinooch, you're right, I suffer from the same condition of being totally overwhelmed with the amount of coin effects there are to learn. It wasn't so bad until I bought a few of the NY Coin Magic Seminar DVD's, then it was all over. There are SO many effects on those DVD's!

  I have to say out of all the coin magic material I've watched and read over the years, Eric Jone's Metal DVD's are one of the best. He's extremely skilled. He starts right from the basics and takes you right up to learning some very effective routines.  My suggestion to start would be to learn anything you can do standing up as that's probably how you'll be doing most of your effects. So a good one coin routine is good or any coin production routine (Eric has a good one on the DVD's) Also, a three fly effect works well. There is a couple of coins across in the spectators hands that you can learn as well so you don't need a table. If you really want to get into coin magic you can't go wrong with investing in a good shell and a good flipper. You can do countless routines with just those two gaffs. Eric goes into some great stuff you can do with gaffs.
   It is easy to get lost in the world of coins. I can't believe I'm saying this but I would stay away from the NY Coin Magic dvd's for now simply because of the glut of coin effects on there and it's easy to get overwhelmed. However, if you want watch them simply for the sake of seeing master's at work then I highly recommend it.
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Jim McGowan

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Reply with quote  #25 
Spinooch, Robert: It is so true that the ability to perform coin magic impromptu and on a moment's notice is great. Especially if you do it with borrowed coins! I find that my own impromptu magic is best and most fun with coins, paper money, rubber bands, and finger rings. So much you can do with those and it is all with props that you are most likely carrying with you every day.

Thanks!

Jim

(By the way, maybe it is just my Firefox here, but on the "Quick Reply" box the buttons below to either submit a post or preview the post are blank! No text on them.)
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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McGowan


(By the way, maybe it is just my Firefox here, but on the "Quick Reply" box the buttons below to either submit a post or preview the post are blank! No text on them.)


Thanks for pointing that out. I'm not sure what I did to screw things up, but I fixed it.

Rudy

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Jonathan Chase

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Reply with quote  #27 
I've always been drawn to coins more than cards or other types of magic.  Being around great card experts like Rudy has helped me expand my non-coin chops but when asked to perform on the fly I always reach for the coin purse first.

-Jonathan
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spinooch81
I have been performing magic for a little while now and mostly did Children's magic for birthday parties. However, every time someone finds out that I am a magician, the first comment is: "Show me a trick!". Now, I usually try to have something on me but when I don't it is a VERY awkward moment. For that reason, I always wanted to get more involved with coins. Yes, there are lots of amazing tricks you can do with cards, but unless you have them in your pocket at all times, you aren't always ready to perform. I always have my wallet with bills or coins in my pocket so it is only logical that I learn coin magic. I have the standard fare of Bobo, Roth, Rubinstein, Jones etc. in my collection, but sometimes I feel overwhelmed with the amount of information available. I think I need to choose one, sit down with coins in hand and just work through it. Eric Jones' Metal series is probably where I will start and supplement with Bobo. Any suggestions?


Spinooch,

I started with Bobo. But what really propelled me forward was David Roth's 3-volume DVD set, "Expert Coin Magic Made Easy." I worked my way through that from start to finish and it was great. After that, I sort of bounced around between Kainoa Harbottle's ebooks and videos (I LOVE his stuff) and then logically (because he was Kainoa's mentor) moved to Curtis Kam (Palms of Steel). Eventually, I bit the bullet and bought The New York Coin Magic Seminar DVD set, which is so dense with coin magic awesomeness that it will take quite a long time to properly go through it all[smile].

One last person I want to mention, whose work with Tenkai Pinch (often called the Goshman Pinch) is Jay Sankey's Revolutionary Coin Magic. It gives you a ton of terrific tricks. One of my favorites is called Mr. Clean Coins Across. His DVD is also filled with a ton of juicy magic goodness. 

In addition to all that, I love Eric Jones. So I think going through his Metal DVD will probably work for you. Ironically, that is one of the few DVDs I don't have:-P. I'll get it eventually.

Good luck with your coin magic journey!

Ken

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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #29 
There was no excuse for me not to have Eric Jones' Metal. His was the first magic instruction of ANY KIND I ever got (free video for joining the Magic Cafe in 2014). And though he has some things on the NYCM Seminar, I just ordered Metal[smile].

Giggle. 

Ken
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JLMagic

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Reply with quote  #30 
Im not saying im obsessed with coins but do love coin magic started with bobo never really got the concept when i was younger but now that im older holy crap does it all make since lol working on full routines right now just fished misbehaven by kainoa harbottle anybody else have recommendation for routines and also i love gaff coins and im talking about ones that are quality made from real coins my favorite gaff coin im working with now is the TUC
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #31 
JL,

I recommend Winged Silver as one routine I always do. It's in Bobo's. David Roth also does a different version, which is the one I normally do. Other favorites of mine include Coins-To-Cup (Buckley, as taught by David Roth), Mr. Clean Coins Across (Jay Sankey), 3 Fly (I do a version by Marion Boykin, but there are several out there), and of course, Tenkai Pennies. I do most of these with half dollars. But 3-Fly is done with "soft" Morgan Silver Dollars. "Soft" is the term given to really well-worn coins who won't "talk" when slid against each-other. Oh, an as for one-coin routines, Kainoa's Flurry and Bachelor's Routine are great. You do need to do a muscle pass for the latter though:-P. If you like gaffs (I'm not a fan, as a rule), I can recommend David Roth's Shell Coins Across, which, as the name implies, requires an expanded shell.

I can't shut up! OK, shutting up[smile].

Ken
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #32 
Just one more thing (channeling Columbo...and dating myself all at the same time[smile]) - Though I have yet to master it 100% (so I haven't performed it for actual humans yet), I love, love, LOVE this coins-across routine by Jose Rafael -


Ken
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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #33 
Ken that's a fine example of a fairly simple trick being highly entertaining. He does a nice utility switch and he has a very nice classic palm. Not to mention he has a great hand wash in there as well. There's not much to this trick but if you're misdirection is bang on and you have good patter that's all you need. Great stuff.
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #34 
Robert,

Actually there is something very tricksy about this one. How do you suppose he shows one coin less in the left hand that previously - openly - held 4 coins? He closes his fist, and bam! he has 3. In the next move he goes from 3 to 2 in the same instant way? Hint: he uses NO gaffs.

If you're interested, pm me. I don't want to expose the secret on this thread.

Cheers!

Ken
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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #35 
Ah, you're right Ken that is pretty slick. And he uses no gaffs?? That's a great move!

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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #36 
No gaffs[smile].

Ken
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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #37 
Needles to say ken, I've sent you that PM [smile]
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #38 
Hehe. I figured you might. I just answered it[smile].

Ken
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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #39 
I've always been fascinated by any coins across. Bobo's book has many, so does the Roth book. One of my all time favorites is Gary Kurtz, and his Trio (Misty Like a Dream).  His book Unexplainable Acts has a lot of nice coin work.
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Nicolás Pierri

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Reply with quote  #40 

 

maybe this answer your question of "are there any coin crazy ? XD 


Iknow this is not mgic but im really into coin magic in my country magicians knows me more from my coin work sadly enough i dont have a lot on coin on youtue [frown] but hey add me on facebook we can share a lot [smile]

 

 

 

 

 

 

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thesmurfman

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Reply with quote  #41 

Coins are SUPER! 

Super hard [smile] at least at first... just holding and handling coins is so strange. Holding them and manipulating them with any real sense of control is certainly a test in patience and practice. 

Once you start performing them though, they quickly become addictive and fun. My main current piece I try to perform mostly is a coins across I am working on. 

I am particularly fond of the routines I find that seem fairly modular, meaning as a novice, it's nice to find some tricks that have phases and routines, that allow me to gauge if the audience is losing interest, I can easily close out... or if interest and my performance are going well, I have more to go with and escalate with.  The cool thing about coins once you start to understand them a bit... is, each production and vanish is it's own effect that can be highlighted and upgraded, cleaned up, worked on. Coins was the first routine that I as a novice felt I could begin to control and change on my own. It was harder for me to get to that point with cards and other props.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michaelblue
I've always been fascinated by any coins across. Bobo's book has many, so does the Roth book. One of my all time favorites is Gary Kurtz, and his Trio (Misty Like a Dream).  His book Unexplainable Acts has a lot of nice coin work.

Good stuff, that happens to be the chapter of Bobo I am working on recently. So many methods to choose from and start to work through. 

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phread

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Reply with quote  #42 
Coin guy here. started magic in 1977 with volume of tarbell. In fact, I still use a coin move from volume 2 of tarbell created by joe berg. now a days it is used as a sponge ball vanish.

bobo, hugards coin magic book( check out martin chapender's coin vanish) roth's OUTSTANDING book... I have been lucky enough to have met a couple of my coin heroes: roth, harbottle and kam at lectures.
 
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Stevie Ray Christian

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Reply with quote  #43 
I like Ike.

My go-to coin routine is a variation of Dan Sylvester's take on The Miser's Dream. My favorite moves in the routine are an appearance--from Chris Kenner's Deep (credited to Homer Liwag and Gary Kurtz)--and of course, the Sylvester Pitch.
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #44 

I do quite a few coin tricks. And a few flourishes too. I can't remember if I have posted this one already but here you go. It is the Leipzig thumb roll:

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Stevie Ray Christian

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Reply with quote  #45 

Mark, Eventually, we all come up with an original move or two as we feel our way through this art. I'll admit it, I cherish my odd and trivial creations*… I love them like trusty dogs--that I don't have to feed or clean-up after.

 

Nate Lepzig invented and refined dozens of coin moves. I can only image the trial and error... the frustration and tenacity each one of those pups required.

 

As I’ve said elsewhere with regard to this Thumb Roll footage, I believe Nate Lepzig imagined a world where his acknowledged creations carry on. He was experimenting with technologies that expanded his theatrical reach and promised to shine for posterity.

 

Could Mr. Lepzig have imagined a man--raised in the British Isles, now living in Canada--sharing moving pictures of one of those treasures? Sharing it at the whim of people in South America, Scandinavia, Texas, Australia, along the Pacific coast and the Eastern seaboard? Sharing that precious flourish on portable glowing panes of glass; sharing and watching, teaching and learning... one hundred years in the future?

 

That’s the thing about 100 years from now… all new people... and if one could dream that their creations would entertain and inspire like-minded artists a century away… well that’s something. 

 

I suppose it’s one of the reasons I find coin work compelling and fun.

 
 

*NOTE: all of my "original moves" were most likely created by Ed Marlo, Bobo or Paul LePaul several years before my birth--and were considered unfit to publish.

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Chessmann

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Reply with quote  #46 
I remember watching David Roth teach a retention vanish on one of his videos.  I was fascinated by how beautiful and clean it looked, and so I determined to do it. 

I must have dropped the coin one hundred times as I continued to go through the motions in front of a mirror.  Eventually, the drops decreased, and the retention vanish became one of the easiest, yet most deceptive things that I do.

Similar story with Harry Lorayne's Ultra Move - for a time, it seemed I would never come close to getting it, but our minds and bodies are pretty fearfully and wonderfully made, and we have capabilities that we don't always realize that we have, and now the Ultra Move is something I never hesitate to do!
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Jeremy Salow

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Reply with quote  #47 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chessmann
I remember watching David Roth teach a retention vanish on one of his videos.  I was fascinated by how beautiful and clean it looked, and so I determined to do it. 

I must have dropped the coin one hundred times as I continued to go through the motions in front of a mirror.  Eventually, the drops decreased, and the retention vanish became one of the easiest, yet most deceptive things that I do.


I'm at that point now with Vinny Marini's Rice Krispies Retention Vanish. Every time I think I've got it, I find another aspect I need to work on. But when it's done right - oh man does it look great! It's definitely getting a lot easier already, but I hope I get to the point when it's that easy and good looking (especially with my non dominant hand). I'll accept even a third of how good it looks when Vinny does it as a success.
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MagicBrian

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Reply with quote  #48 
For some reason, I always found the retention vanish impossible to pull off. Then I put a silver dollar in my pocket and started practicing it every free moment I had--standing in line somewhere, on the phone, etc. Eventually, I stopped really paying attention to the nervous "tick" I had developed. One night as I was standing with some friends, my hands naturally gravitated to pulling out the coin and doing the retention vanish. Someone standing next to me stopped what they were doing and said, "That's amazing!" At that moment, I was hooked on improving every coin move I had.

I always carry a coin holder (not a coin "purse", as that would be un-manly, of course) with Walking Liberty halves in it, and whenever I am asked to do an effect it is a coins across routine into the spectator's hands. I have found people to be much more amazed by a coin trick than a card trick simply because they usually have money in their pockets and it seems to connect more with them as a "regular item" rather than a "magic" one.

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