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Fortunato Luchresi

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Bye all.
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #2 
   Picture cards.
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Chi Han

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Here's a Wikipedia article on it:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Face_card
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Blathermist

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All three terms are correct and magicians know this. But layfolk? Only some are familiar with the term "face cards" and nowadays, with card players being generally thinner on the ground than in days of yore, it is somewhat antiquated.

The term "court cards" still remains eminently acceptable, but "picture cards" is far more immediately graphic.

When it comes to spot cards, I prefer and always use the term "number cards". No ambiguity.

Mind you, the Mighty Erdnase (latest research proves he was British) uses the terms court and spot(s) so what do I know.

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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #5 
I refer to them as court cards, but like the idea of referring to them as “picture” cards.

On a similar note, I find it interesting that when I ask someone to sign a card on its “face”, they don’t always know what I mean by that. “Do you mean the side with the numbers on it?”

Maybe I should start asking them to sign the card on the “numbers” side.

Rudy

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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #6 
Funny, I've been in magic 52 years and never heard the court cards referred to as 'face' cards. But then, I am a Brit. If someone referred to a face card I would have thought they meant the card at the face of the deck.  I will continue to refer to them as court card or royal cards as that is how I spell in lie detector routines, lol.
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Gareth

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Interesting. The Ace (particularly an ornate Ace of Spades)...a royal card (vital member of a ROYAL flush), a picture card (picturesque), a court card (a member of that Royal family?), a number card (ACE isn’t a number) or a court card (see royal flush)??

Does the Ace sit in court or outside with the spotty plebby little common folk numbers?
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Paul Hallas

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth
Interesting. The Ace (particularly an ornate Ace of Spades)...a royal card (vital member of a ROYAL flush), a picture card (picturesque), a court card (a member of that Royal family?), a number card (ACE isn’t a number) or a court card (see royal flush)??

Does the Ace sit in court or outside with the spotty plebby little common folk numbers?


Outside. It might be a member of a royal flush but that's simply a poker term. in some card games the ace is just a lowly 'one'.

In days of old I believe the court cards often represented real kings and queens from history?
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DJ

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Hallas

In days of old I believe the court cards often represented real kings and queens from history?


I think this is true.  But now days, with all the custom decks, it's usually the creator and his/her friends!

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Blathermist

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Reply with quote  #10 

I don’t play cards these days, but back then the ace was always ace or one. Often both.

So, the Ace may not be a number, but to echo Paul’s point, the royal flush connection has nothing to do with the ace and comes about from the fact that one of cards is a face card, another is a picture card and the third is a court card. The lowly and often ignored ten is actually the highest value number card.

I’m much younger than Mister Hallas, and my magical tenure is far less extensive, but some of the early 20th century card books I fell over when I was learning to walk did occasionally refer to "face cards". Annemann and the Encyclopaedia to name several.

And while we’re here, jacks, queens and kings are not 11, 12 and 13. Unless it suits the occasion, of course.

Apropos of nothing in particular, some years ago I was toddling around the tables and at one point, I asked a spectator to name his card. He said "the second of clubs".

Before I could smack him in the mouth, his friends, good naturedly, said "Twerp, you mean the two of clubs". We did laugh.

It’s only happened once, thus far. And I have no idea what, if anything, it signifies. Possibly he was a second child and felt inhibited or threatened by some reminder of the fact.

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