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Anthony Vinson

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Eric Jones did a wonderful job on a recent episode of America’s Got Talent. I watched the clip on YouTube and enjoyed Eric’s presence and performance. There were a couple of glaring tells during the performance caused by the limitations of the medium. They could have and should have been edited out, since they wouldn’t have been noticed by spectators on the spot… But that’s another matter.

I read the comments. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I know one shouldn’t read the comments, but I usually do. They amuse me as well as support my less-than-positive opinion of the species homo Americus in general. However, the most important reason for reading the comments, at least for me, is to gain a more thorough understanding of a critical spectator’s point of view when it comes to analyzing methods.

With the ability to limitlessly replay, pause, rewind, and examine videos, it is nigh impossible for any magician to “fool” a television or video audience. In most cases the savvy analysts correctly determine methods. When magicians appear on national television programs they are, in fact and effect, exposing methods.  It is the unavoidable price one must pay for the privilege of appearing. Or is it?

What practical effects can you think of or conceive that would be both magical and entertaining, and also immune to quick, correct analysis and expose by video critics? Effects using methods that the casual spectator could never detect, even if they suspect?

For the sake of completeness, here's the clip:

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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #2 
Yesterday's show was live. There was no chance of editing out. But I have to admit, when he pulled the card through the glass the cameraman was in the optimal spot to give that illusion.
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DJ

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Reply with quote  #3 
Jay Sankey recently posted an interesting Youtube video explaining how he fooled Penn and Teller on their show by performing effects that he knew they would know the method for but by actually using a different method. There was some discussion around afterward (I think Penn even chimed in) if this was actually fooling them or not but I guess that is a whole other matter.  When Penn and Teller were guessing how everything was done they guessed with the method they thought they saw.  Sankey went along with it but then later posted his video about his true methods.  I realize this is a different show that we are talking about, but I guess if you consider the video critics who were watching the Jay Sankey performance, many of them had to have also given an incorrect analysis.
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Anthony Vinson

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EVILDAN
Yesterday's show was live. There was no chance of editing out. But I have to admit, when he pulled the card through the glass the cameraman was in the optimal spot to give that illusion.


Ah, I didn't know that and it does make a difference. I only watch the clips on YouTube. Thanks for the clarification.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #5 
I think P&T are trying to avoid getting people on the show who use "gotcha" methods i.e. I fake a move and hope you think that's what I did. Also, they don't like acts that do three or four items all using the "fake out" methodology and hope that one of them gets P&T to take the bait.

I think they are correct in this view. The tactic should not involve baiting and then you win if they take the bait i.e. pretend to be palming by holding your hand a certain way etc.

Mike
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #6 
Mike, good points. To be clear, I do not advocate creating routines designed to misdirect, but rather that are "bullet proof" from easy analysis and exposure on social media. The first is just confusing, the second is conniving.  
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #7 
So Eric makes it to the semi-finals! Great job, Eric. Best of luck and thank you for elevating the art of magic in eyes of the general public.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #8 
Finally had a chance to watch the video. I though Eric did a fantastic job. Really solid magic all around. I had to rewind the chip through glass. The method was clear the second time. It's really based on the Bob Swadling trick where a half dollar visibly penetrates a handkerchief. The glass makes it even better. I do wonder how good the chip looks sitting on the glass when it's ready to "go."

The Chad Long idea of card coming out of the wall was adapted to a penetration. Looks great, especially at the angle shown in the vid.

M
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arthur stead

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Reply with quote  #9 

I agree, Eric did a fantastic job on AGT (in all 3 of his segments).  He’s a solid entertainer, and with his formidable skills he makes tricks look like “real” magic.


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