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EndersGame

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Reply with quote  #1 

I'd like to be able to recommend a youtube channel to some high school students starting out with card magic.  They are starting from zero, and I am hoping that learning a few decent but simple card tricks will get them interested in more card magic.

Requirements:

- focus on teaching tricks (i.e. not a card fundamentals course, but rather teaching some effects)

- relatively easy, not too advanced (i.e. Jay Sankey's channel is great, but bit difficult, he assumes knowledge of many sleights)

- good technique and reliable teacher (i.e. I'd rather avoid a mediocre teenager teaching double lifts, for example)

- family friendly (i.e. no potty language or questionable humor)

- regular deck of cards (i.e. no gaffs)

Any good suggestions please?


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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #2 
This guy hits most of your marks: https://www.youtube.com/user/mismag822

Is he a great teacher? Not in my book, but he is generally effective and he has lots of viewers and likes. You get what you pay for, and for the price he's pretty good!

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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #3 
   My obviously biased, VERY biased, opinion --- why youboob when there are books like THE MAGIC BOOK available? 
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #4 
Harry, I don't think anyone - knowledgeable magician - would argue with your point about The Magic Book. I have given copies as gifts to two nephews who were interested in magic, and purchased both of those copies from you! That said, today's high school aged kids are more conditioned to learn by video over books. Too bad? Yeah, but we gotta deal with reality. If Ender can manage to ignite the interest of some kids, perhaps they will graduate to "the good stuff"?

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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #5 
   Perhaps.   I just think that "pushing" the video stuff (youboob) isn't helping- it's "hurting" the "high-school aged kids.". Just my opinion. Bad enough that it's there - why "push" it - when we can "push" the books that'd help them much more?
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Blathermist

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Reply with quote  #6 

Always books for me, but that’s by the way.

Anybody who’s ever had a magic book in their hands knows that the eternal temptation is to turn the page, then another page. And onwards. Doesn’t matter, because the book is there waiting. Sooner, rather than later, it’s back to the beginning and the book gets the attention it deserves. No damage done.

With YouTube channels, the page turning goes on forever. Whether the starting point material is any good or not, doesn’t matter. The students know there are "pages to be turned" so off they go. The curiosity factor is all consuming and sailing the tinterweb is all there is.

Rather than study, it becomes an exercise–and adventure–in discovering secrets.

Whether or not the students are in some way "supervised" is irrelevant. As soon as the "supervisor" blinks, off they go. Most people don’t stay the course, but in the meantime they’ve been handed the key to the exposure box.

It’s not impossible, but there are better–as in more productive–ways to teach.

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luigimar

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Reply with quote  #7 
As always books are for me as well, but EndersGame asked for videos... 

One resource I found some time ago is this one https://52kards.com/library/     

EndersGame, have a look there and if you think it is (part of) what you asked for, then let those young people know about the site...

I hope that helps...




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Harrisgagnon

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Reply with quote  #8 
Considering I started learning magic a year ago at the age of 15 from youtube, I hope my suggestion is perfect because I know have read multiple books and invested time into magic, which these kids will hopefully end up doing. 

I learned from multiple youtube channels. 
One which you probably heard of is scam school. They teach many bar bets and game like bets but the tricks they do teach are very simple.
https://www.youtube.com/user/scamschool

Another channel is 52 kards mentioned by Luigimar. They have a beginner section. 


Might not be as great as what you are looking for but Mismag (mentioned by Anthony) and Cardshuffler have some simple tricks that are easy to learn. I don't think either are great teachers (and cardshuffler is a teenager) but they are also how I got into magic. If they learn a couple easy tricks from them and get good reactions they might take it more seriously. 

I also don't like how cardshuffler has magic reveals on his channel. Maybe if you go through the channel and try to find a good trick and give them that specific link it would avoid the bad parts of the channel.

https://www.youtube.com/user/mismag822

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6OoS3VkSBLFKWP_7K7OErg

What ended up happening is, after I watched some of these videos it lead me to Chris Ramsay's channel and he mentioned royal road and I bought it for cheap on amazon and off I went!
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #9 
I agree with Harry. I would never recommed a YouTube channel to a beginner.
Give them a book. If they are keen and eager, and worthy, they will learn from it. Once they've shown some promise, you can recommend some more books and some good Dvds or downloads.
Stay away from Scam School and 52 Kards.
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EndersGame

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicfish
I agree with Harry. I would never recommed a YouTube channel to a beginner.
Give them a book. If they are keen and eager, and worthy, they will learn from it. Once they've shown some promise, you can recommend some more books and some good Dvds or downloads.
Stay away from Scam School and 52 Kards.

In theory I agree.  But I'm talking about 50-60 kids high school students here, and I can't give them all a book or expect them to buy one.  That's just not realistic.  Normally I'd stay away from youtube for someone learning card tricks as well, but for the situation I'm in, it makes the most sense and here is why:

The situation is a teacher with several classes of students aged around 12-15, i.e. more than 50 kids altogether. I've performed card tricks for them numerous times, which they've really enjoyed, and it's generated their interest in learning magic.

The next step is to get them trying some simple card tricks. I've challenged them (as an optional extra-curricular activity, outside of school hours) to learn and perform a card trick for me and their peers, with some small prizes for all participants. I'd like to give them a few links where they can find a few decent videos that get them going learning some card tricks.  Quite a large number of them are interested in doing this.

Most of these kids are starting with zero knowledge/experience with card magic, so hence something fairly basic and nothing too complicated. But there are some who are quite keen and are willing to tackle something slightly harder.

After this is all said and done, that will be the time for me to give them the names and titles of some recommended books/DVDs for those who are keen to journey further into card magic on their own.  

I don't want this thread turning into a debate of books vs videos vs youtube - that's off topic.  I'm just looking for suggested online video links at this point, so thanks for those passed on so far, and keep them coming! 😉


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"Instead of attempting to learn a great number of tricks, concentrate upon a few good tricks and master them so that their technique and their presentation is so excellent that those who see them will want to see them again." -Expert Card Technique
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Chi Han

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EndersGame

In theory I agree.  But I'm talking about 50-60 kids high school students here, and I can't give them all a book or expect them to buy one.  That's just not realistic.  Normally I'd stay away from youtube for someone learning card tricks as well, but for the situation I'm in, it makes the most sense and here is why:

The situation is a teacher with several classes of students aged around 12-15, i.e. more than 50 kids altogether. I've performed card tricks for them numerous times, which they've really enjoyed, and it's generated their interest in learning magic.

The next step is to get them trying some simple card tricks. I've challenged them (as an optional extra-curricular activity, outside of school hours) to learn and perform a card trick for me and their peers, with some small prizes for all participants. I'd like to give them a few links where they can find a few decent videos that get them going learning some card tricks.  Quite a large number of them are interested in doing this.

Most of these kids are starting with zero knowledge/experience with card magic, so hence something fairly basic and nothing too complicated. But there are some who are quite keen and are willing to tackle something slightly harder.

After this is all said and done, that will be the time for me to give them the names and titles of some recommended books/DVDs for those who are keen to journey further into card magic on their own.  

I don't want this thread turning into a debate of books vs videos vs youtube - that's off topic.  I'm just looking for suggested online video links at this point, so thanks for those passed on so far, and keep them coming! 😉



There's definitely room in the world for open and free magic instruction, and youtube just happens to be an easily accessible platform for a lot of people. Did you ever think about creating your own channel? You could make playlists of stuff for them to learn, that would be your quality control. They would recommend it to their friends, and after a while you could even make money off it to reinvest in the channel (better equipment etc...).
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Chi Han

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Reply with quote  #12 
I should also add that I would definitely recommend youtube channels, but I really don't use them for learning, and I don't personally feel comfortable recommending something that I don't use in this instance. That said I find Chris Ramsey's channel very interesting, although it might be more for the vlogs and the magic discussions rather than the actual tutorials...
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #13 
"I don't want this thread turning into a debate of books vs videos vs youtube - that's off topic.  I'm just looking for suggested online video links at this point, so thanks for those passed on so far, and keep them coming! "
I disagree that it's off topic. And I stand behind my advice weather it is one child or a hundred children.
I've been in this scenario many times as have many magicians throughout the decades without the internet.
Don't discard our advice Enders.
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #14 
"and I can't give them all a book or expect them to buy one.  That's just not realistic."

My friend Eugene Burger would beg to differ.
If they think buying a book is too much of a sacrifice for being a miracle worker, then they should seek another vocation.

They must know that being a powerful magician takes time, effort, practice, sacrifice.
Have these students already taken the oath or will you be performing the ritual for them?
If not, I highly recommend the simple but solemn oath at the beginning if the Klutz Book of magic. I commend the authors of this fine book for its material and its teachings of secrecy, and the effects are excellent and instill the beginner with a sense of pride and stewardship.

Future magicians will come to the art of their own free will and accord and nothing will stand in their way. Not a book price. Not a lecture fee. Not distance from a shop. Not lack of communication with other magicians. Nothing. With or without a YouTube channel, those who are serious will find a way.
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Chi Han

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicfish
"and I can't give them all a book or expect them to buy one.  That's just not realistic."

My friend Eugene Burger would beg to differ.
If they think buying a book is too much of a sacrifice for being a miracle worker, then they should seek another vocation.

They must know that being a powerful magician takes time, effort, practice, sacrifice.
Have these students already taken the oath or will you be performing the ritual for them?
If not, I highly recommend the simple but solemn oath at the beginning if the Klutz Book of magic. I commend the authors of this fine book for its material and its teachings of secrecy, and the effects are excellent and instill the beginner with a sense of pride and stewardship.


While this does sound incredible, I feel there are many ways to skin a cat. I'm very skeptical of ways that purport to have the monopoly on imbuing traits. Especially if the only substantive reason being that that's the way it was done in the past. Is buying a book the only way to instill these values? Is it a necessary way? What other avenues of teaching and learning should we explore?

To paraphrase rear admiral Grace Hopper, the most dangerous words in the English language are 'we've always done it this way'.
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #16 
Really? The ONLY substantive reason?
I'm disappointed in how easily you dispose of our opinions.
By leading people who haven't solicited our secrets to willing exposers, you are harming magic.
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Chi Han

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicfish
Really? The ONLY substantive reason?
I'm disappointed in how easily you dispose of our opinions.
By leading people who haven't solicited our secrets to willing exposers, you are harming magic.


Well give me another reason why books should be the only way to teach those traits and I might consider it. As things stand I'm very wary of absolutes.

Also I am likewise disappointed by you easily disposing of my opinion.
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #18 
Nobody in this thread
said books should be the only way to teach. Let's read before we type.
Let's keep this a civil discussion gentlemen.
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Chi Han

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicfish
Nobody in this thread
said books should be the only way to teach. Let's read before we type.
Let's keep this a civil discussion gentlemen.


My mistake. Then can I clarify, how do you think I've discarded your opinion? I never said you were wrong, just that it's not the only way to teach.

In effect are we in agreement? Have I not actually discarded your opinion? I think you may have misread/understood me.
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #20 
Geez, some of you guys sound old. And that's saying something since I am pushing 60. Ease on back up to the 8th post in this thread. Read it. Read it again. A youngster - and I mean that with dignity and respect, Harris - has expressed his opinion, and it matches perfectly with much of the research about today's youth. Video instruction is preferred over books. And as Harris clearly points out, it was the video instruction that led him to books. Maybe he has something to teach us in this case? What a concept.

Yes, those of us who grew up with books naturally embrace the medium. I still have a library card and currently have six books checked out from my local library. I know the librarians by names, and they know me. I love books and always will. That said, the younger generations, both Millennials and Z, were raised in different circumstances. They know what "we" taught them, and we're going to turn around and scorn them for taking the lessons to heart? Next you'll be yelling "Get off my lawn!"

Had YouTube been around when I was learning magic, there is no doubt that I would have sucked it up with a straw. Face it, there are some terribly talented young magicians out there who are taking our art in new directions, and many of them learned from YouTube rather than books. And man, are they good! Ultimately the important thing is that they learned. Now, let's gently prod them toward all the wonderful stuff buried in print. Let's stress the importance of the history of our art, teach them about the shoulders of those upon which we all stand. Perhaps they will listen if we teach rather than preach.

Ender appears to be trying to spark an interest in magic among a group of youngster that he is familiar with. How cool is that? Trust him to understand the implications and help him find what he asked for. Good on you for spreading the gospel of magic, Ender, and best of luck with the project. Please let us know how it proceeds.

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Jed

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Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony Vinson
Geez, some of you guys sound old. And that's saying something since I am pushing 60. Ease on back up to the 8th post in this thread. Read it. Read it again. A youngster - and I mean that with dignity and respect, Harris - has expressed his opinion, and it matches perfectly with much of the research about today's youth. Video instruction is preferred over books. And as Harris clearly points out, it was the video instruction that led him to books. Maybe he has something to teach us in this case? What a concept.

Yes, those of us who grew up with books naturally embrace the medium. I still have a library card and currently have six books checked out from my local library. I know the librarians by names, and they know me. I love books and always will. That said, the younger generations, both Millennials and Z, were raised in different circumstances. They know what "we" taught them, and we're going to turn around and scorn them for taking the lessons to heart? Next you'll be yelling "Get off my lawn!"

Had YouTube been around when I was learning magic, there is no doubt that I would have sucked it up with a straw. Face it, there are some terribly talented young magicians out there who are taking our art in new directions, and many of them learned from YouTube rather than books. And man, are they good! Ultimately the important thing is that they learned. Now, let's gently prod them toward all the wonderful stuff buried in print. Let's stress the importance of the history of our art, teach them about the shoulders of those upon which we all stand. Perhaps they will listen if we teach rather than preach.

Ender appears to be trying to spark an interest in magic among a group of youngster that he is familiar with. How cool is that? Trust him to understand the implications and help him find what he asked for. Good on you for spreading the gospel of magic, Ender, and best of luck with the project. Please let us know how it proceeds.

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Beautifully said. Each word fits reality. Totally Agree with what you've written. Keep the good opinions up.
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #22 
Well said Anthony.
@Chi Han, I think we just misunderstood each other.
@Enders, I hope you are not offended. I think the best way to use Youtube for a beginner is to show them some performances of the Masters. This way they can see the highest degrees of excellence without the exposure.
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Intensely Magic

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony Vinson
.......

Ender appears to be trying to spark an interest in magic among a group of youngster that he is familiar with. How cool is that? Trust him to understand the implications and help him find what he asked for. Good on you for spreading the gospel of magic, Ender, and best of luck with the project. Please let us know how it proceeds.

Av


You sir, are a child from my perspective, but you hit on the most important issue in the OP's post. Your last paragraph (quoted above) is on point.

Nobody is showing these kids YouTube. There are plenty of public domain books available and, realistically, plenty that aren't PD.

This is a chance to educate and enthuse. Maybe a half a dozen or so may have a serious interest. The OP understands that kids don't want to spend weeks learning scales, they want to play a song. That's a fact that we need to understand. We may not like it, but it's reality.

We've all created a fairly lengthy thread blathering and pontificating, but have come up with bupkus, myself included. We can do better. I need to give this some thought.

i/m

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Mbreggar

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Reply with quote  #24 
I dealt with almost the same situation a few years back. I told the students, YouTube is fine, but the real “arcana” is found in magic books. That’s where the real tricks are and the real magic exists. Point ‘em to Harry’s book or Mark Wilson’s course

But... if they still insist on video, Penguin has a free download with lots of good tricks for complete beginners
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Jim Straight

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Reply with quote  #25 
I like FernandoP1. A Million Card Tricks is okay.
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EndersGame

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Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbreggar
But... if they still insist on video, Penguin has a free download with lots of good tricks for complete beginners

That would be the two hour video linked below, priced at free for the digital download, right?

It's not bad, but there's not much card magic included.  Plus Penguin Magic's decision to bring in a model as a spectator for some eye candy is a bit unnecessary and unfortunate in my opinion.  Or was it a different one that you had in mind Michael?

http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/1910

[7664a]
Contents listing and ad copy:
  • Ultimate Pick a Card - The spectator's card JUMPS out of the center of the deck!
  • Ghost Match - A match mysteriously vanishes and ends up inside the matchbook... attached! One of the best bar/restaurant tricks on the planet.
  • French Drop - Vanish a coin and produce it from your spectator's ear! There's a reason people talk about this trick years later... it's that good!
  • One Coin Routine - A magical combination you can do anytime! This one will give you the confidence to really feel like a magician anywhere you are!
  • The Great Shoelace Escape - One of the most visual and entertaining escapes there is!
  • Force and Reveal - Have complete control of your spectator's choices!
  • Best Friend Prediction - Divine a spectator's best friend's name or predict who they're going to marry!
  • Magician's Choice - This may be the single biggest reason magician are the happiest people on earth! They always get their way!
  • Linking Paper Clips - A great little trick you can teach your friends if they want to learn a trick... without giving away any of the powerful secrets you've been fooling them with the whole time!
  • Jumping Rubber Band - An eye-popping trick where a rubber band jumps through your fingers!
  • Coin to Napkin - A coin vanishes and ends up in an impossible place!
  • Salt Shaker Thru Table - The ultimate dinner table trick!

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"Instead of attempting to learn a great number of tricks, concentrate upon a few good tricks and master them so that their technique and their presentation is so excellent that those who see them will want to see them again." -Expert Card Technique
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EndersGame

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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicfish
@Enders, I hope you are not offended. I think the best way to use Youtube for a beginner is to show them some performances of the Masters. This way they can see the highest degrees of excellence without the exposure.

This is a great idea, and I can certainly do this in addition to what I've been doing already.

I'll start a new thread to ask for some suggestions for videos like this.

Edit - here's the link: http://www.themagiciansforum.com/post/i-want-to-get-some-1215-year-olds-interested-in-card-magic-what-youtube-videos-9906657

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"Instead of attempting to learn a great number of tricks, concentrate upon a few good tricks and master them so that their technique and their presentation is so excellent that those who see them will want to see them again." -Expert Card Technique
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Mbreggar

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Reply with quote  #28 
Yes. That is the one. It has been a while since I glanced at it. I had forgotten about lack of card tricks and the introduction of eye candy! Still I think there is good stuff and instruction in there for beginners.
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