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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #51 
    Thanks for them kind words, Deckster - you have marvelous taste!
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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #52 
Speaking of influential books and their authors...Mark Lewis just posted a video in his section of the Session Room, where he talk about Harry and says, "As a writer, I consider him to be the best magic writer of the 20th century..."

I agree!!
 

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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #53 
Indeed. That video was recorded over a year ago I think. I had no idea I was ever going to post it here.
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #54 
You know, Rudy--it has occurred to me that many people here cannot see that video or indeed any of the Ask Mr Lewis posts simply because they do not have access to the secret sessions area. Since I have no secrets and I wish the art to progress I think it would be helpful if people were allowed access to my own section willy nilly. There is no point me chattering away there if people can't see what I am chattering about. By all means keep the other Secret Sessions secret but it is the nature of the beast that I require an audience. I wish to advise but if nobody can ask Mr Lewis then Mr Lewis is not going to be in a position to answer them. He ain't psychic you know. Oh sorry--I forgot---please ignore that last sentence.............................
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wbausert

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Reply with quote  #55 
Someone suggested that Harry Lorayne is perhaps the finest writer of magic. I must say I agree -- there's no one better. One of the characteristics that make Harry's books so good is that you can hear him talking as you read his words. And if you read his material with a deck of cards in your hands...as he suggests...you are able to work your way through the routine more easily than when reading most other magic books. It's as if Harry is over your shoulder providing personal instruction. And his afterthoughts are terrific in adding perspective to the experience of potentially adding that trick into your repertoire.
Magically,
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wbausert

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Reply with quote  #56 
I just thought of another set of lecture notes that I consider essential...Doc Eason's A Shot In The Act.
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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #57 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wbausert
I just thought of another set of lecture notes that I consider essential...Doc Eason's A Shot In The Act.


I recently purchased his "Card Under Glass" DVD's. Fantastic!

You can get it here... http://doceasonmagicshop.com/oscommerce/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=115

And here's a review... http://www.mylovelyassistant.com/reviews/view/4664

Rudy

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wbausert

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Reply with quote  #58 
Good to know. I do JC Wagner's Card Under Drink with a right hand top palm rather than a left hand bottom palm, so I'm sure I would benefit from Doc's work on it.
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Reply with quote  #59 
Anything I've ever had by Doc Eason is great, I wholeheartedly recommended anything by him. In fact it was he who convinced me to get 'The Magic Book' by Harry Lorayne, which was brilliant advice and definitely impacted on my thinking and performance.

Doc's multiple selection routine is great stuff, 'Fusillade'... It's by Doc Eason and Paul Cummins and incoprates memorising the spectators names, it's well worth looking into.

Paul is also a great thinker and his FASDIU books have some great ideas in them too.
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #60 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudy Tinoco
Speaking of influential books and their authors...Mark Lewis just posted a video in his section of the Session Room, where he talk about Harry and says, "As a writer, I consider him to be the best magic writer of the 20th century..."

I agree!!
 

I refuse to have that video hidden away in the session room where nobody can see it so here it is now. I do mention Harry in response to a question by Paul Pacific and what pleases me is that my response then was at least a year ago before this forum was put together so nobody can accuse me of being a sycophant and they will know I was sincere when I said it.

Here it is: The Harry bit is at 31.50 but I urge you to watch the whole thing if you ever get time. It is after all 45 minutes long. However, Paul Daniels saw it and tweeted about it and commented on it in Facebook saying it was "pure gold for magicians" 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2276&v=zISDN54WhDg

Yes, yes, I am psychic and know that Harry will take issue with my statement that most of his books concern his own material rather than the works of other people compared to Ganson but I haven't read much of it. I don't think Ganson wrote much at all about his own stuff.

 

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Chessmann

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Reply with quote  #61 
The 2 books I spent the most time with as a youth were Bobo's Coin Magic book, and Hay's Amateur Magician's Handbook.
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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #62 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chessmann
The 2 books I spent the most time with as a youth were Bobo's Coin Magic book, and Hay's Amateur Magician's Handbook.


Both great books, especially the one by Henry Hay. A wonderful introduction to the art of magic.
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wbausert

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Reply with quote  #63 
Doc Eason was the first person to introduce me to Harry's The Magic Book, too. It was specifically in reference to his Color Changing Deck, which Doc said was either from The Magic Book or based on the one Harry published there. I've been doing that first phase of it as Doc does it ever since. Then I do phase 2 of Chicago Opener to end the trick.
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Charlie

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Reply with quote  #64 
I've been giving this one lots of thought. During the formative year of my first go round with magic (I'm currently in my new formative year after a long hiatus) The magical art journal Paul Harris: The Act had an massive influence on my interest in magic.

I had already bought Super magic after seeing some of the effects demonstrated at my local magic shop. Some great stuff in that book but not really a great book. I hadn't done any sleight of hand, save immaculate connection at that point. A few months and some lessons later I was given a copy of the MAJ Written by Michael Ammar who is a much more through writer than Paul. He went into the presentation of Paul's act in great detail and unlike Paul's own books up to that point, the methods were very detailed and easy to follow.

The audacity of his patter and presentation and my perception of Paul's persona (which was not really what i saw on video recently) through the writing really captured my imagination. I began doing a version of his act filtered through my own 13 year old frame of reference. Trying to charm and disarm rather than impress and that worked really well for me because I was playing to other teenagers and older young adults in impromptu settings so there would always be some hostile members of the crowd.

The book/periodical gave me an understanding of how and the inspiration to start building routines, writing my own patter and boldness to trying to create my own handling and magic. I started mixing and matching ideas, modifying their methods to suit my personality. I suppose that owes more to Michael's writing than to Paul because I didn't actually use many of the effects in that book, the invisible palm, big time leaper and reset. I did use a lot of Paul's magic from his other books that suited my tastes though.

The issue also acted as a decoder on reading many other magic writers who were light on presentation (especially those by Paul and Frank Garcia) or were dated or didn't fit my audience. It also made me more selective about the books I bought giving me a template of what to look for in instruction.  I really should re-read this.
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MikeIkirt

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Reply with quote  #65 
The best books I have read that have taught me more, and influenced my magic have been the Card College books.  I've worked through them, and have attempted everything at least once.  Unfortunately, that was several years ago, so I forgot most of what I did.  Nowadays, I use it mainly as a reference.  When I get stuck on a sleight, or need a quick refresher on something, then I go to them.  Also, the Tarbell series.  I haven't done much in there, but it did strengthen my understanding of magic.  The theory sections were the most helpful to me.
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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #66 
Doctor1976 says "The theory sections were the most helpful to me"

This sentence sums up my approach to the art of magic, I know enough tricks to last ten lifetimes, but I can never get enough theory.

And Charlie's post above mentions being influenced by Paul Harris. He has some cool tricks too, and I found a great essay by David Abram in one the 'Art of Astonishment' books.

If you're interested in reading the essay you can find it here:

http://www.wildethics.com/essays/making_magic.html
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Mr. Danny

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Reply with quote  #67 
Well, I watched Marks video (all of it) and enjoyed it very much. [smile]
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #68 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Danny
Well, I watched Marks video (all of it) and enjoyed it very much. [smile]

Glad you enjoyed it.

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MikeIkirt

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Reply with quote  #69 
Unfortunately for me, I didn't realize there were books and magazines available for magicians until about oh, maybe 15 years ago.  I don't have a magic shop anywhere near me, and my time in the military didn't afford me much time to explore.  I always thought that the only way to learn was to find another magician to teach you.  The only books or videos I had access to were from the library, and most of them were more "gag" books.  I read Mark Wilson's book, and learned a few tricks from there, and that was about it.  Then, somehow, I discovered this whole new world of magic on the net.  Then, I found a magic shop in Pittsburgh! I've only been there a couple times, but I've loved every moment I've been there.  I bought my first book from there, I think it was Best of Friends 2.  That's when I realized I needed a lot more education in this art.  I only got the Tarbell books about 6 years ago.  Since then I read everything I can.  I'm still checking the Lybrary to see if anything new is on there.  I don't go for the "one trick" books.  I like my stuff to have a little meat to it.
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Mr. Danny

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Reply with quote  #70 
There was once a magic shop in Shreveport, (100 miles away), that I got to go to before it closed. As far as I know, there are no shops in North Louisiana now. 
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #71 
Oh, the brick and mortar shops are dying off like flies. The damn internet has a lot to do with it of course. I consider this to be a very sad thing.
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Mr. Danny

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Reply with quote  #72 
Yes Mark, the internet has caused many changes. Some good, some not so good.
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MikeIkirt

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Reply with quote  #73 
Yes, many changes indeed.  I'm not fond of ordering ANYTHING off of a generic or web-only webstore.  I try to order stuff that comes from an actual store, when possible.  The cuckoo's nest over in Pittsburgh has gotten alot of my money.  I ordered the Tarbell set from Tannen's.  About the only thing I get from web only stores would be cards.  I use the oddball backed cards to practice with.  About the only good thing I can think of that's magic related are ebooks.  I love having an entire library right on my Kindle.  Unfortunately, there's not a lot of those to be had, at least the one's I've been interested in getting.
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Mr. Danny

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Reply with quote  #74 
Yes Doc, Reading a book on a tablet is not the same as turning a page, but, time marches on......................
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MikeIkirt

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Reply with quote  #75 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deckster


  If I only get one book on the island?  hmmmm, it'd probably be a Lorayne.



I'd second that....hopefully we can get more than one, maybe 2 Loraynes and "Greater Magic".  That would be enough to keep anyone occupied most of their life!
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #76 
   So, wait a minute - does that mean that the other twenty-five or so books that I wrote were a waste of my time??!!?
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MikeIkirt

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Reply with quote  #77 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne
   So, wait a minute - does that mean that the other twenty-five or so books that I wrote were a waste of my time??!!?


Heck no, but if we were only allowed a couple of books, how the heck could you decide between them?
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rready

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Reply with quote  #78 
I owned a shop for 10 years back around 1980. Mostly everyone just orders off the internet which is fine but there's no feeling better than to go to a brick and mortar shop and talking magic with the owner or your magician friends who may be there. That is what is missed if there were no more B&M shops around anymore. There were many good magicians in my area back then and they would come in and show me something that would blow me away. Saturdays would be a time when most would come in and show something they were working on. TomG who is a poster here was one of those who would come in and fool me with a Bob King effect or an Alex Elmsley trick he just read.
   
 The internet is great and there's nothing like getting a package in the mail of something you ordered and can't wait to open but I just hope we don't lose the B&M shops that are trying to make a go of it.





          
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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #79 
I think the books that influenced us can very often be the first books we come across, and these books may depend on our age, and availability of books at the time. For people that have come into magic over the past 20/30 years, they probably have no idea how difficult it was to access 'real' magic books. It was a rare treat to find a magic book in a book store or library when I was growing up. Consequently, the books that influenced me were more like Paul Clive's Card Tricks Without Skill, Scarne On Cards, Annemann's Impromptu Card Magic and later Annemann's Practical Mental Magic which was probably the book that switched me onto mentalism.  My main focus still seems to be cards (though I do other close up stuff) and mentalism.

Other early books were Harry Baron's Card Tricks for Beginners, a Peter Warlock book I picked up in Woolworth's, some of the Bill Severn books. and Encyclopedia of Card Tricks  which kept me busy for awhile . These were the books that influenced my early years in magic, not the books that are considered classics. I think I'd been doing magic nearly 15 years before I got around to looking at Expert Card Technique or Royal Road.

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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #80 
    I still haven't really looked at Expert Card Technique or Royal Road. But Paul, 20/30 years ago a few of my books were definitely available. You just weren't given good suggestions!!! (Nor were you looking in the right places. Same for me, I guess, 'cause I never really got into any of the books you mention above.)
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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #81 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne
    I still haven't really looked at Expert Card Technique or Royal Road. But Paul, 20/30 years ago a few of my books were definitely available. You just weren't given good suggestions!!! (Nor were you looking in the right places. Same for me, I guess, 'cause I never really got into any of the books you mention above.)


Maybe I mean 40 plus years ago, AND in England, lol. Certainly before I was a member of any magic club  or knew of magic dealers. There was no-one to offer any advice, so it wasn't a case of not being given good suggestions, it was not having anyone to give ANY suggestions.

The Paul Clive book was originally published in 1949 and must have been a good seller as it went through several reprints over the years. My copy (not that I have it any more) was probably published in the sixties. To be honest, HAD anyone suggested the Annemann or Scarne books or The Encyclopedia of Card Tricks I don't think they would have been bad suggestions. Still good books.

These were days when I'd not heard of yourself, Vernon, Marlo etc. It was before Ammar, Daryl, Harris etc.  were  on the scene.

Probably the only famous magicians I'd heard of were British TV magicians David Nixon and Tommy Cooper.
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Mr. Danny

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Reply with quote  #82 
Henry Hay's Amateur Magician's Handbook was the book that got me into magic.
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Blathermist

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Reply with quote  #83 

Paul is right. Paul Hallas, that is.

People coming into Magic over the past 20/30 years, really don’t have any idea how difficult it was to access "real" magic books back then. No reason why they should of course. Though it’s a bit short-sighted (to say the least) to think that it’s always been as easy as it is today. Many do.

Mister Lorayne is (of course) right when he says that his books were around then. They’ve been around for over 50 years, though being an Ancient Briton, they weren’t around when I was looking for the real work.

Paul Clive's "Card Tricks Without Skill," and "Scarne On Card Tricks," were two early efforts. The Clive book came on a birthday, or Christmas and the Scarne book from the library. Not the full version, but an abridged effort featuring "75 Card Tricks."

A couple of years before the Scarne book turned up on the library shelves, I also found "Royal Road" and "Professional Magic Made Easy" by Bruce Elliot. As noted elsewhere on the forum, "How To Do Card Tricks And Entertain People," by Harry Baron also appeared on the library shelves. How they came to be there I don’t know. Somebody in the buying department must have thought magic was a reasonable pastime.

Paul also mentions not having anyone to offer advice. Me too. I never met another magician, or even someone remotely interested in magic until I was an adult. Well, late teens, which for me is the same thing.

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Blathermist

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Reply with quote  #84 

Unlike Paul (Hallas) I did hear heard of Vernon, Marlo, Slydini, Cy Endfield and a few others at an early age. I don’t recall how I did it but somehow I latched onto to some old copies of Abra magazine and via that Harry Stanley’s Unique Magic and The Gen. I could never afford a subscription, but I acquired a few single, random copies.

It was in a Unique catalogue in the early 60s that I read about Close-Up Card Magic. "Straight from the pen of the master card worker" said the blurb. Wow. That was never going to be in the library. Quite right too. But the price was beyond a ragged-trousered school kid.

When I did acquire the book a couple of years later it was part of a bargain parcel of books spotted in the Small Ads in Abra. Personal Secrets, and My Favourite Card Tricks were also on board, together with a fistful of other stuff. I didn’t like everything in Close-Up Card Magic and still don’t (who likes everything?) but there was plenty that I did (and do) like. Best of all though, was the style of the book; it appealed as no magic book had before. As much as I loved Royal Road, I always felt it was like a school text book. Good, but still with the somewhat fusty dust and chalk odour of the classroom. Ditto, the Clive Book and most others. Even Bruce Elliot, who was quite chatty was sidelined a bit. Close-Up Card Magic wasn’t like that.

You can’t keep a good story down and I’ve warbled this yarn off and on and here and there for any number of years, even going so far as to sneak it into print on one occasion. I guess nobody was looking at the time.

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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #85 
   Just curious, Blathermist, which stuff in C-UCM didn't you like? Be helpful for me to know, so that I could work accordingly with other books, if there ever are "other books." Anyway, just curious.
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Tom G

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Reply with quote  #86 
CUCM was the first book I bought that made me realize I could really do card magic. 
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #87 
    It will be interesting, to me anyway, to see if you didn't like the same items in C-UCM that Blathermist didn't like. Still waiting to hear from him.
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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #88 
Close-up Card magic has something for everyone, but not every trick will resonate with everyone. I really like Ose's Cut, and the teaching on the Faro weave.

There's plenty of good stuff in there for those who like to do tricks.
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #89 
   Of course "not every trick will resonate for everyone." Blathermist's remark just "hit" my curiousity - since he mentioned not liking "everything." Just curious as to which items Blathermist didn't like. So, just waiting for his "list."

    I'm not only curious, but also interested in that kind of thing. That's what helped me decide, over the years, which items to leave out of my THE CLASSIC COLLECTION volumes. Since space was an issue, people telling me which items in the originals they didn't particularly like helped me make those decisions. So, just curious as to which items Blathermist didn't like in C-UCM. (Too late to do anything about it now, obviously, so again - just curious.)
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Blathermist

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Reply with quote  #90 

Following a hefty few days delivering and consuming Easter eggs, here we are.

Sorry, Mister Lorayne, no list. Impossible to create a tick-in-a-box response. However, here’s something to put you sleep.

I have more than several books, some of which I’ve actually opened and looked at. I don’t have any with contents that appeal 100%. That is, I like them and won’t part with them, but I don’t like everything. It’s subjective and entirely personal and no amount of analysis or (attempted) explanations will be of any use to anybody. It’s what it is.

In the Foreword to Close-Up Card Magic, Cardini is quoted as remarking that there was only one bad trick in the book, but wouldn’t say what it was. That will have to do for me. Although a key difference is that I haven’t said anything is bad; only that I didn’t like everything. Not the same thing at all.

However, here’s a bit of fuel for the fire. I have never liked the Curry Turnover Change and Close-Up Card Magic did nothing to alter that feeling. I came across the move in one of Cy Endfield’s card books. Actually it was one of the books being serialised in The Gen, pre publication, I think. I wrestled with the version in More Card Manipulations, to no result. Al Koran had a trick and description in Genii, I think. Still nothing.

Incidentally, the Card Manipulations and More Card Manipulations series were part of the "Bargain" Parcel," I mentioned previously; though I already had copies; bought from Davenports..

I experimented with various approaches to the Breakless Curry Change, which were all the over the place at one time. Hierophant in particular comes to mind. Still didn’t like it.

Does this mean it’s no good? Of course not. It’s just not for me. I didn’t like it then and I still don’t like it.

I appreciate that "consumer research" can be useful, but this consumer marches to a beat that most researchers and data analysts don’t get and never will. That doesn’t make me special, unique yes, after all we’re all unique, but it’s just not helpful, except to me. As I said previously, it was the style of the book (Close-Up Card Magic) that grabbed me as much as anything.

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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #91 
     Okay, fine and thanks. You've helped me win a couple of bets. Had discussions with magic friends about this and I bet 'em all that what you "didn't like" would be the section on the Curry Turnover Change (it was soooo obvious to me). So, thanks, you helped me win a few drinks!
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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #92 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blathermist

Following a hefty few days delivering and consuming Easter eggs, here we are.

Sorry, Mister Lorayne, no list. Impossible to create a tick-in-a-box response. However, here’s something to put you sleep.

I have more than several books, some of which I’ve actually opened and looked at. I don’t have any with contents that appeal 100%. That is, I like them and won’t part with them, but I don’t like everything. It’s subjective and entirely personal and no amount of analysis or (attempted) explanations will be of any use to anybody. It’s what it is.

In the Foreword to Close-Up Card Magic, Cardini is quoted as remarking that there was only one bad trick in the book, but wouldn’t say what it was. That will have to do for me. Although a key difference is that I haven’t said anything is bad; only that I didn’t like everything. Not the same thing at all.

However, here’s a bit of fuel for the fire. I have never liked the Curry Turnover Change and Close-Up Card Magic did nothing to alter that feeling. I came across the move in one of Cy Endfield’s card books. Actually it was one of the books being serialised in The Gen, pre publication, I think. I wrestled with the version in More Card Manipulations, to no result. Al Koran had a trick and description in Genii, I think. Still nothing.

Incidentally, the Card Manipulations and More Card Manipulations series were part of the "Bargain" Parcel," I mentioned previously; though I already had copies; bought from Davenports..

I experimented with various approaches to the Breakless Curry Change, which were all the over the place at one time. Hierophant in particular comes to mind. Still didn’t like it.

Does this mean it’s no good? Of course not. It’s just not for me. I didn’t like it then and I still don’t like it.

I appreciate that "consumer research" can be useful, but this consumer marches to a beat that most researchers and data analysts don’t get and never will. That doesn’t make me special, unique yes, after all we’re all unique, but it’s just not helpful, except to me. As I said previously, it was the style of the book (Close-Up Card Magic) that grabbed me as much as anything.

Thanks for taking the time to respond to Harry with your thoughts. You communicate incredibly well, Blathermist. I appreciate the difference that you pointed out between your statement and Cardini. None of us are going to like everything and sometimes there's no particular reason that we don't like a certain trick or move. i don't think that it's all that helpful to make a list of all the things we hate. Just my two cents. Rudy

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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #93 
       Rudy, I think you mean Cardini, no? And gotta' put in my less than two cents worth - yes, I believe that most often, not always of course, there is a reason not to like a certain move - the reason being "I can't do the d*mn thing" or "I can't get away with the d*mn thing." I know that I don't like the Classic Pass - don't like if for me - 'cause I don't feel that I can get away with it. The same holds for second/bottom/center deals, diagonal palm shifts, culls, top changes, and so on.

      But, of course, there are those who will swear re: all the above, and do "get away" with them. Way back then I was fooling the heck out of pretty knowledgeable card guys with the Curry Turnover, as were many all over the world. So, as usual, to each his own.
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MikeIkirt

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Reply with quote  #94 
I've never been good with the Classic Pass.  I read the description in Card College, and I tried and tried to get it, but to no avail.  I can get the moves, just can't make it invisible.  I wasn't any good with a classic force, either.  I used to rely on the Criss Cross Force, or the one where you have the spectator cut the cards, then basically just hand them the top card of the deck anyway.  I have gotten away with it, though.  Partly due to a video of Mr. Lorayne's I saw, and he basically said to just hand them the card.  Spread out the deck, grab the cards you aren't forcing and just put your force card in their hands.  It works. A lot.  
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #95 
    Not sure I recall that, but - forcing isn't a problem for me. I use quite a few different ones. My The Lorayne Force is a can't miss definite. And I use cutting small packets to the table, asking the spec. to stop me - hard to miss this force. I use the Criss Cross Force where apropos.

      And the behind-my-back Classic Force, which I discussed fleetingly in REPUTATION-MAKERS. You can see me doing it at the start of my Ambitious Card Routine at http://www.youtube.com/harrylorayneonvideo (hope I've got that right).
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MikeIkirt

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Reply with quote  #96 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne
    Not sure I recall that, but - forcing isn't a problem for me. I use quite a few different ones. My The Lorayne Force is a can't miss definite. And I use cutting small packets to the table, asking the spec. to stop me - hard to miss this force. I use the Criss Cross Force where apropos.

      And the behind-my-back Classic Force, which I discussed fleetingly in REPUTATION-MAKERS. You can see me doing it at the start of my Ambitious Card Routine at http://www.youtube.com/harrylorayneonvideo (hope I've got that right).


I'll have to look back and see where that was at.  I think it was the behind the back force you were talking about, to be honest.  I know I still have the video somewhere in the mess I call my magic file.  I got so bad there for awhile, I bought everything that had Harry Lorayne, Jeff McBride, or Dai Vernon on the cover.  Well, I can't call it bad.  I got a better education from those books/videos than I did from most stuff I have ever bought.  Now I'm working on stuff from Daryl.
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pnerd

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Reply with quote  #97 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne
    Not sure I recall that, but - forcing isn't a problem for me. I use quite a few different ones. My The Lorayne Force is a can't miss definite. And I use cutting small packets to the table, asking the spec. to stop me - hard to miss this force. I use the Criss Cross Force where apropos.

      And the behind-my-back Classic Force, which I discussed fleetingly in REPUTATION-MAKERS. You can see me doing it at the start of my Ambitious Card Routine at http://www.youtube.com/harrylorayneonvideo (hope I've got that right).

Here is Harry Lorayne's Ambitious Card Routine: 

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Blathermist

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Reply with quote  #98 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne
     Okay, fine and thanks. You've helped me win a couple of bets. Had discussions with magic friends about this and I bet 'em all that what you "didn't like" would be the section on the Curry Turnover Change (it was soooo obvious to me). So, thanks, you helped me win a few drinks!

I didn’t say anything about not liking the "Section on the Curry Turnover Change". It’s the move that I don’t like. The section itself contains some interesting ideas, concepts and the like. All of which are food for thought.

"The Little Card That Wasn’t There," is one, as is the item that follows it, "Plunge-Thru". And "1-2-3-4" has a nice mis-show subtlety that, back then, I hadn’t come across. Although, as noted I was still a mere strip of a youth.

So, not the section at all.

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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #99 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne
       Rudy, I think you mean Cardini, no? And gotta' put in my less than two cents worth - yes, I believe that most often, not always of course, there is a reason not to like a certain move - the reason being "I can't do the d*mn thing" or "I can't get away with the d*mn thing." I know that I don't like the Classic Pass - don't like if for me - 'cause I don't feel that I can get away with it. The same holds for second/bottom/center deals, diagonal palm shifts, culls, top changes, and so on.

      But, of course, there are those who will swear re: all the above, and do "get away" with them. Way back then I was fooling the heck out of pretty knowledgeable card guys with the Curry Turnover, as were many all over the world. So, as usual, to each his own.


Thanks for the correction, Harry. Yes, I meant Cardini. 

Rudy

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zarrow52

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Reply with quote  #100 
Royal Road to Card Magic
Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic
Scarne on Card Tricks
Encyclopedia of Card Tricks (Hugard)
Self Working and More Self Working Card Tricks (Fulves)
Smoke and Mirrors, Dear Mr Fantasy, and Destination Zero (Bannon)
Expert Card Technique
Classic Collection Vol 1 (by you know, that guy!)
The Classic Magic of Larry Jennings
The Annotated Erdnase (Darwin Ortiz)

Sean
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