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Fortunato Luchresi

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Reply with quote  #1 
Bye all.
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #2 
Semantics and rhetoric. Me? I am a magician. By that I mean that use a combination of sleight of hand, subtlety, and storytelling to exploit exploit certain deficiencies in the human brain, thereby creating entertaining illusion. Magic as in paranormal or supernatural manifestations of phenomena caused by spells, charms, invocations and such? There is no evidence to support its existence.

I will note that Genii Magazine is subtitled The Conjuror's Magazine, so there are are those who do, or did, agree with your label.

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Blathermist

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Over the years I’ve become less and less enamoured of the words "magic" and "magician." My tolerance level has dipped considerably. Although, as it’s not a problem, "tolerated" is probably a bit strong. It’s been magic and magicians since the moment I fell under the spell and I’m content enough to use the term. If anyone asks "Are you a magician?" I always answer yes. Saves time and nobody wants to hear a monologue about the perceived pros and cons of the various alternative terms.

Conjuror is my preference. No reason. It is what it is.

 

Give or take an edit or two this is the first paragraph of an essay I wrote some years ago. Have no fear, the rest is not about to follow………

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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #4 
The origin of "conjure" in Latin is "take an oath together; conspire".  In Old French it meant "plot or exorcise" (we begin to see the magical interpretation here).  Regardless of origin, it seems that in modern English the word means both "do something by magic" and also "do something as if by magic"

(Thanks to Google for the etymology)
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François Lagrange

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Reply with quote  #5 

Where I grew up, in France, we used to say “prestidigitateur” i.e. prestidigitator. It was quite a trick to be able to say it without stumbling, so we would short it to “presti”.

Anywhere else I say magician as nowadays most people are well aware of megastars like Penn & Teller and know what it means.

I find the term conjurer and conjuring too near to its origins of sorcery (casting spell and  summoning of spirits by invocation - in French) for comfort.

A short anecdote: when I first read in English the Erdnase section on magic, I had no idea how to pronounce “legerdemain” which means sleight of hand. It’s only much later that the penny dropped and realised that “leger.de.main” was French for “light of hand” and so a clue to its pronunciation. That was before the advent of Google, of course. I have heard one person call himself "legerdemainist" - sounds barbaric to me [wink]

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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #6 
How about legerdemaniac?
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #7 
Paul Daniels is a Conjuror.
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Dawes
How about legerdemaniac?


[rofl]
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