Sign up Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
JoshTheMagician

Member
Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #1 
Has anybody got this book and if so what do you think of it ?

Would it be good for a Beginners   ?

Thank you [biggrin]
0
EVILDAN

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,675
Reply with quote  #2 
Very good beginner's book. Has a lot of magic in it and a lot of different kinds of magic.
0
luigimar

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member - Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,063
Reply with quote  #3 
Yes, it is good for beginners. It has a mixture of different types of magic... highly recommended.

You can see a summary of the book here: 

http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/S3603


And here you have some more detail about the book:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Wilson%27s_Complete_Course_In_Magic

I bought this book more than 30 years ago and I read it several times throughout the years. About 12 years ago I found and bought a "pocket" version of this book (it is about the same thickness of the original and it fits on the palm of your hand) but it does not have the same content. It is missing some effects found in the original.


__________________
Luigimar
Magic is Within...
0
arthur stead

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 565
Reply with quote  #4 
Excellent book with lots of magic.  Highly recommended.
__________________
http://www.arthurstead.com
0
prestigiazione.it

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 61
Reply with quote  #5 
It is "THE" book for beginners!
__________________

Mr. Andrea Clemente Pancotti
"If I could climax as many times as a Derek Dingle routine I would be a happy man!" Dai Vernon
Please Visit http://www.prestigiazione.it/wp/tag/english

0
Harry Lorayne

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,116
Reply with quote  #6 
    You might even find that my THE MAGIC BOOK also falls into the "THE" book for beginners area.
0
Blathermist

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,019
Reply with quote  #7 

The Wilson book is indeed a very good beginner’s book, as is this effort from joshua jay:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=node%3D4853&field-keywords=joshua+jay+magic+books 

 But as noted on a nearby thread, so is Harry Lorayne’s The Magic Book. With the added bonus that the man himself is here to answer (occasional) questions.

0
Harry Lorayne

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,116
Reply with quote  #8 
    I always wonder if those who state SO definitely what's BEST know about all the others in that particular category. In my experience - they do NOT. I'm so careful about that - when I was publishing APOCALYPSE (the BEST magic magazine - HAH!!!) people would send things and say "the best." I simply would never allow that. Of course, saying "the best that I KNOW OF" makes a bit (no a lot) more sense.
0
Harrisgagnon

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 300
Reply with quote  #9 
I think that is a great book to start with! If you are looking for just cards I like royal road and if you want variety as Harry mentioned earlier his magic book is also great! 

-Harris
0
Michaelblue

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,125
Reply with quote  #10 
The Wilson book has a very magical torn and restored card, along with other great stuff
0
Mind Phantom

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,239
Reply with quote  #11 
Is anyone on here who remembers Mark Wilson's Magic Circus ?
0
Rudy Tinoco

Founding Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,098
Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logan Five
Is anyone on here who remembers Mark Wilson's Magic Circus ?

I’ve never seen it. Looks like it was before my time [smile]


__________________
http://www.facebook.com/magicrudy
http://www.facebook.com/themagiciansforum
0
Harrisgagnon

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 300
Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne
    You might even find that my THE MAGIC BOOK also falls into the "THE" book for beginners area.


Agreed!
0
Harrisgagnon

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 300
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harrisgagnon


Agreed!


Oops lol didn't realize I already commented about the magic book earlier
0
Rudy Tinoco

Founding Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,098
Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harrisgagnon


Oops lol didn't realize I already commented about the magic book earlier


No biggie. It’s worth mentioning again [smile]

__________________
http://www.facebook.com/magicrudy
http://www.facebook.com/themagiciansforum
0
JustChico

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 92
Reply with quote  #16 

I have Mark Wilson's Course book (and, of course, Harry's The Magic Book). Something I've always wondered about Wilson's is how to best use it. Is it a book that you just start on page 1 and go through it as one would a novel, with each effect either building upon something previously covered or introducing a new concept? Or, is it better to look at the table of contents as a sort of "menu" where you can look through it and say, for instance, "Oh, that coin through the handkerchief thing looks interesting," and just jump right in?

Granted, I haven't had a lot of time to dedicate to this, hence my question.

0
Pinhead52

Member
Registered:
Posts: 25
Reply with quote  #17 
I, too, was lucky to find an old hardcover of "Course". The best part of it is that it really has the basics of everything most modern magicians know; common card mechanics, scarf basics, rope tricks, and some stage stuff. All described in easy to follow but precise detail. It is magic 101. I still reference it sometimes when I need to get back to basics, or when I want to branch into something new (sponge balls, cups, etc). I have purchased "Complete Course" as a starting book as a gift for a friend's son who wanted to get into magic, and for an adult friend who also wanted to learn. And, if you don't get a chance to compare your tome to a modern version, "Complete Course" really is just "Course" with a few modern things at the end.

It is the best starting magic book that I have read.
0
Robin Dawes

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,113
Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logan Five
Is anyone on here who remembers Mark Wilson's Magic Circus ?


Not the Magic Circus, but I remember watching The Magic Land of Allakazam on a black-and-white TV, on station KVOS out of Bellingham Washington, full of static and ghost-images because of the weak signal and the mountains between - fiddling with the rabbit-ears to stabilize the reception.  In my memory, it was the first magic I ever saw.  The suave and charming Mark Wilson, the lovely Nani Darnell, the crazy Rebo ... the very start of my life-long fascination with magic.
0
Mike Powers

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,584
Reply with quote  #19 
Definitely remember The Magic Land of Allakazam!! Used to be an avid fan when we lived in California.

Mike
0
EndersGame

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 298
Reply with quote  #20 

I do love Mark Wilson's "Complete Course in Magic", and it is certainly ideal for beginners. 

It gives a good introduction to card magic, and has some excellent material, both in terms of the sleights covered and effects taught.

The only down side is that it is somewhat dated in terms of presentation.  There are black-and-white illustrations throughout, and while these do serve to help you visualize how things are done, it's hard to beat some of the more recent materials coming out.

For example, Joshua Jay's "Magic: The Complete Course" comes full of glossy colour photographs, and a companion DVD which has him teaching many of the effects.

But Mark Wilson's book is a classic for good reason, and is certainly one of the more comprehensive resources geared towards beginners who are serious about learning magic.


__________________
[nTzBCzo]
BoardGameGeek reviewer EndersGame - click here to see all my pictorial reviews:  Playing Card Reviews  Magic Reviews  Board Game Reviews 

"Instead of attempting to learn a great number of tricks, concentrate upon a few good tricks and master them so that their technique and their presentation is so excellent that those who see them will want to see them again." -Expert Card Technique
0
Bmat

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 259
Reply with quote  #21 
Mark Wilson's book of magic is possibly one of the best books for beginners and here is why. 

Every move is followed with a clear illustration.  It is not wordy, very direct and easy to follow.  Within its pages it covers the basics of magic (and beyond) Covers all genre's of magic.  Even teaches you a few stage illusions you can make with card board boxes.  The book is not expensive and very well thought out.   

Add with the book, a few half dollars, sponge balls, some magicians rope, a silk (or cloth) and a deck of cards and you have more than a life time at your finger tips.  

Not only is it excellent for beginners its excellent for us old folks too.  

And while everyone is different, which is why I too hesitate to say anything is the best.  I have to say Mark Wilson't book is the closest one can come to being the best.  

Carl Fulves also has some excellent offerings for beginners. 

__________________
bmat10@wordpress.com
0
Socrates

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 609
Reply with quote  #22 
Mark Wilson, Harry Lorayne and Karl Fulves are excellent resources for any magician.
0
Jabs Mckee

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 143
Reply with quote  #23 
What are some of your hidden gems in the Mark Wilson Complete Course in Magic??
0
EndersGame

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 298
Reply with quote  #24 
It might not be considered a "hidden" gem, but the Four Card Assembly (p.123) is very good.  It's a MacDonald's Aces type effect. 

Summary: Four Aces are dealt face up, three indifferent cards are dealt face down on each pile. Spectator selects one pile, others are returned to deck. Three Aces vanish from deck, and are found in the Ace pile.

His cups and balls section is also very good, and so is his sponge ball routine.

One drawback of Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic is that while it is excellent in teaching the essentials of technique, it is lacking somewhat in teaching the essentials of showmanship and presentation.  It's one thing to know the mechanics of how to perform a trick, but it's quite another to know how to present it well, and in a way that will prove entertaining.  As such, a beginner would need something alongside this book to help them develop that part of their craft.

__________________
[nTzBCzo]
BoardGameGeek reviewer EndersGame - click here to see all my pictorial reviews:  Playing Card Reviews  Magic Reviews  Board Game Reviews 

"Instead of attempting to learn a great number of tricks, concentrate upon a few good tricks and master them so that their technique and their presentation is so excellent that those who see them will want to see them again." -Expert Card Technique
0
Steven Youell

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 774
Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoshTheMagician
Would it be good for a Beginners?

Yes, it's a fine book for beginners. So is The Magic Book by Harry Lorayne. I strongly recommend both books.

Side note: be suspect of anyone telling you that something in magic is "The Best". No one can make accurate recommendations for you until they know something about you-- goals, abilities, wants and needs. People who make recommendations specifically for you without asking you any questions are usually doing you (and Magic) a disservice.

__________________
Please share this on Facebook!
0
EndersGame

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 298
Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jabs Mckee
What are some of your hidden gems in the Mark Wilson Complete Course in Magic??

I once made a list of favourites from Mark Wilson's book, as suggested by various magicians.  Here's that list:

p.89 Color Changing Aces No. 1: Four Aces shown. Two reds dealt to table, transpose with blacks

Comment: A classic - a simple version of Dr. Daley's last trick, gets good reactions and is easy.

p.95 Double Thought Projection: Cards from a red deck are shown face up, any card named by spectator is shown to have a blue back! This is placed back into the blue deck, which is spread face down to reveal one red card: the duplicate selected card!

Comment: Tricks with different coloured backs can be very impressive with good presentation.

p.123 Four Card Assembly: Four Aces are dealt face up, three indifferent cards are dealt face down on each pile. Spectator selects one pile, others are returned to deck. Three Aces vanish from deck, and are found in the Ace pile.

Comment: A nice MacDonald's Aces type effect.

p.145 Self Reversing Pack Outdone: Cards mixed face down and face up straighten themselves out, but a selected card is left face up in center

Comment: An easy to do and modifiable Triumph.

p.228 The Six Bill Repeat: using gimmicked bills

Comment: A popular favourite from the book for many people.

p.305 The Sucker Torn and Restored Napkin: a torn-and-restored effect

Comment: Fun to perform, and people are always surprised by the ending; perhaps the most often mentioned favourite from the book.

p.335 The Envelope Stand "Bank Night" Variation: Spectators unable to find envelope with dollar bill, unlike magician.

Comment: Bank Night style tricks always tend to be mystifying; it's another classic.

p.339 The Impossible Penetration: Two rolled up bills penetrate each other

Comment: This is a "betcha" type trick, ideal for parties.

p.481 Tic Tac Toe Prediction: predict the outcome of a game

Comment: Very easy, yet seems impossible to the spectator; can even be done on a business card for spectator to keep.
NB: This is in the "Reputation Makers" section, which wasn't in earlier editions of the book.

p.498 Chapstick Caper: bill transposition

Comment: The effect of the transposition is like real magic.
NB: This is in the "Reputation Makers" section, which wasn't in earlier editions of the book.

And then of course there are classics, none of which are `hidden gems' as such, but all very solid versions of each:
p.237 Cut and Restored Rope
p.393 Sponge Ball Routine
p.423 Cups and Balls


__________________
[nTzBCzo]
BoardGameGeek reviewer EndersGame - click here to see all my pictorial reviews:  Playing Card Reviews  Magic Reviews  Board Game Reviews 

"Instead of attempting to learn a great number of tricks, concentrate upon a few good tricks and master them so that their technique and their presentation is so excellent that those who see them will want to see them again." -Expert Card Technique
0
Jabs Mckee

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 143
Reply with quote  #27 
Thanks for posting the notes Endgamer!!!  I really like when people do those. It makes me want to go back and check out what I may have overlooked!

0
Harrisgagnon

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 300
Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EndersGame

I once made a list of favourites from Mark Wilson's book, as suggested by various magicians.  Here's that list:

p.89 Color Changing Aces No. 1: Four Aces shown. Two reds dealt to table, transpose with blacks

Comment: A classic - a simple version of Dr. Daley's last trick, gets good reactions and is easy.

p.95 Double Thought Projection: Cards from a red deck are shown face up, any card named by spectator is shown to have a blue back! This is placed back into the blue deck, which is spread face down to reveal one red card: the duplicate selected card!

Comment: Tricks with different coloured backs can be very impressive with good presentation.

p.123 Four Card Assembly: Four Aces are dealt face up, three indifferent cards are dealt face down on each pile. Spectator selects one pile, others are returned to deck. Three Aces vanish from deck, and are found in the Ace pile.

Comment: A nice MacDonald's Aces type effect.

p.145 Self Reversing Pack Outdone: Cards mixed face down and face up straighten themselves out, but a selected card is left face up in center

Comment: An easy to do and modifiable Triumph.

p.228 The Six Bill Repeat: using gimmicked bills

Comment: A popular favourite from the book for many people.

p.305 The Sucker Torn and Restored Napkin: a torn-and-restored effect

Comment: Fun to perform, and people are always surprised by the ending; perhaps the most often mentioned favourite from the book.

p.335 The Envelope Stand "Bank Night" Variation: Spectators unable to find envelope with dollar bill, unlike magician.

Comment: Bank Night style tricks always tend to be mystifying; it's another classic.

p.339 The Impossible Penetration: Two rolled up bills penetrate each other

Comment: This is a "betcha" type trick, ideal for parties.

p.481 Tic Tac Toe Prediction: predict the outcome of a game

Comment: Very easy, yet seems impossible to the spectator; can even be done on a business card for spectator to keep.
NB: This is in the "Reputation Makers" section, which wasn't in earlier editions of the book.

p.498 Chapstick Caper: bill transposition

Comment: The effect of the transposition is like real magic.
NB: This is in the "Reputation Makers" section, which wasn't in earlier editions of the book.

And then of course there are classics, none of which are `hidden gems' as such, but all very solid versions of each:
p.237 Cut and Restored Rope
p.393 Sponge Ball Routine
p.423 Cups and Balls



Hey Endersgame! I saw you posted this on the theory 11 forum too! That was the thread I started! Just thought it was a funny coincidence. 
0
EndersGame

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 298
Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harrisgagnon
Hey Endersgame! I saw you posted this on the theory 11 forum too! That was the thread I started! Just thought it was a funny coincidence. 

Yes, that is a funny coincidence!  I had just posted the list here, and was then browsing some other forums when I came across the same question there.  I did find it an odd coincidence, but figured I'd try to be helpful and post the list there too! 😉

__________________
[nTzBCzo]
BoardGameGeek reviewer EndersGame - click here to see all my pictorial reviews:  Playing Card Reviews  Magic Reviews  Board Game Reviews 

"Instead of attempting to learn a great number of tricks, concentrate upon a few good tricks and master them so that their technique and their presentation is so excellent that those who see them will want to see them again." -Expert Card Technique
0
Kevin

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 81
Reply with quote  #30 
Thanks for this Enders. I have this book on my shelf and have barely looked at it. This will help alot.
0
Mbreggar

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 255
Reply with quote  #31 
I bought this book when it was first advertised as a "course" in Genii and other magazines (I think I saw it first mentioned in Omni Magazine). The premise was that Wilson got several of his friends together, including Walter Gibson (whom I understood wrote most of the book) and U.F. Grant, in an attempt to modernize course-based magic instruction. In other words, write something current and relevant to take the place of Tarbell (isn't that what Harry DID in Tarbell #7). 

The course package I received included the book, a couple of jumbo cards, rope, blank deck, thumb tip, a couple of small silks, a bundle of "Out to Lunch" cards and perhaps a few other things. Also a hand-signed 8x10 photo of Mark (which believe it or not, still hangs in my office today). The book has well written instructions and solid illustrations of a very good selection of tricks, but as Ender said earlier, not much on the performance of magic. Tarbell, of course, is all over that! And Harry's New York attitude and patter suggestions make the performance aspect of magic quite clear (in his The Magic Book).


0
Paul Hallas

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,108
Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoshTheMagician
Has anybody got this book and if so what do you think of it ?

Would it be good for a Beginners   ?

Thank you [biggrin]


It was intended for beginners and highly praised when first released, so yes, well worth your picking up.
Probably one of the better beginner books out there.

Over the years the book has been split and released as separate books.

Mark Wilson will be at the S.A.M convention in Orlando in a few weeks.
0
ZAVIADELITA

Member
Registered:
Posts: 33
Reply with quote  #33 
The book has some good effects in it. There is one where you have a match book and tear out a match and light it and it blow it  and vanish it and it  ends up   back in the matchbook in its burnt form and is attached to the matchbook.
0
Kevin

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 81
Reply with quote  #34 
Check out page 92 - Sandwiched Aces. What a great, easy little trick. I'm really glad I caught this thread.
0
Kevin

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 81
Reply with quote  #35 
Sorry for replying to myself, but I have been playing with this all evening. This is a killer trick.

I went on a book buying spree and have so many now that I have barely glanced at. I know I have gold my shelves.....I wish I had the time to read them all.
0
EndersGame

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 298
Reply with quote  #36 
I've been browsing through this book again in the last week - some good material here, and it's a good course for introductory/intermediate magic.

In the edition I have, Walter B. Gibson is credited as a co-author on page 13.  Yet his name isn't mentioned on the cover or on the back of the book.  The second or third page in the book has a list of acknowledgements and credits, and includes a list of "contributing writers" and "special contributing author" (UF Grant), but Walter Gibson's name isn't mentioned anywhere at all on that page.  What role did he have in writing the book actually, given the minimal credit that seems to be given to him?

__________________
[nTzBCzo]
BoardGameGeek reviewer EndersGame - click here to see all my pictorial reviews:  Playing Card Reviews  Magic Reviews  Board Game Reviews 

"Instead of attempting to learn a great number of tricks, concentrate upon a few good tricks and master them so that their technique and their presentation is so excellent that those who see them will want to see them again." -Expert Card Technique
0
Kevin

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 81
Reply with quote  #37 
My version of the book, 1988 printing, has a whole write up of him on page 13. Basically, he and Wilson wanted to "shape magic in the years to come"..."combining underlying principles with the vast array of present methods.....".

It goes on to basically say this was a joint effort.
0
Mbreggar

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 255
Reply with quote  #38 
I will find the specific source, but I recall it spoke of a Wilson and Gibson’s meeting and the decision to put together a relevant course in magic. Wilson designed the curriculum and suggested most of the tricks and effects. Gibson, an extremely prolific writer and very well connected in the worlds of both magic and publishing took on the majority of the writing chores. Whether others like U. F. Grant were active participants or just gave their blessing to the use of their tricks, is unclear. It is also unclear who wrote the appended section of Reputation Makers in later editions though it is written in the first person and its style is significantly different that the original text. Could it have been Mark Wilson directly?
0
Kevin

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 81
Reply with quote  #39 
What printing year is that Reputation Makers chapter in? My 1988 version doesn't have it.
0
Mbreggar

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 255
Reply with quote  #40 
I will have to check. I have 2 versions. The original version (comb bound with a padded leatherette cover) and one I bought at Border's (remember them??) perhaps 15 years ago. It is the later edition that has the Reputation Maker chapter -- and photos instead of illustrations.

0
EndersGame

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 298
Reply with quote  #41 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin
What printing year is that Reputation Makers chapter in? My 1988 version doesn't have it.

My edition is from 2002 and has the Reputation Makers chapter. 

Judging by the copyright years listed in that edition, I think that was the first year it was added.

__________________
[nTzBCzo]
BoardGameGeek reviewer EndersGame - click here to see all my pictorial reviews:  Playing Card Reviews  Magic Reviews  Board Game Reviews 

"Instead of attempting to learn a great number of tricks, concentrate upon a few good tricks and master them so that their technique and their presentation is so excellent that those who see them will want to see them again." -Expert Card Technique
0
Mbreggar

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 255
Reply with quote  #42 
Yep. That’s what I have too. It seems to have been added for the Running Press edition (the mass marketed one)
0
Blathermist

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,019
Reply with quote  #43 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Youell

Yes, it's a fine book for beginners. So is The Magic Book by Harry Lorayne. I strongly recommend both books.

Side note: be suspect of anyone telling you that something in magic is "The Best". No one can make accurate recommendations for you until they know something about you-- goals, abilities, wants and needs. People who make recommendations specifically for you without asking you any questions are usually doing you (and Magic) a disservice.

Agreed. There’s no such thing as "Best". Except on a personal basis. "I think this is fine/wonderful/rubbish/whatever is fine." I’ve said it myself and will again, adding "but you may not like it".

Incidentally, I never recommend anything. I used to, but stopped when someone took severe umbrage at a review I’d written for the society magazine. And I do mean severe. I went so far as stuffing the money for the book into the complainant’s pocket and walking away.

We were good pals until this point and though eventually diplomatic relations were restored, it was never the same. Who’da thunk it?

Meanwhile, I wouldn’t say "suspect" exactly. The review I’m referring to was simply me being enthusiastic. Listen, of course, take note, but it does pay to be wary.

0
Blathermist

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,019
Reply with quote  #44 

Agree with the thumbs up given to the Mark Wilson thing. It does cover a wide range, which means beginners get an appreciation and perspective of most (all?) aspects of Magic. With this start, looking at and thinking about individual areas becomes less daunting.

The Joshua Jay book does a similar job.

Back in the day (1978) I bought two books with the same title: "The Magic Book". They were both published at about the same time, as far as I’m aware. We know the author of one of them, the other was Karl Fulves. This has since been republished under the title of "Big Book Of Magic Tricks". The Fulves effort is a bit like the Wilson book, in that there is some historical material. It is considerably less substantial than the Wilson book, but for me it’s worth a look.

Unlike the Lorayne book, which people (sensibly) cling to, this one crops up quite frequently in the used magic section of many dealers at low prices. In the UK anyway.

0
Kevin

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 81
Reply with quote  #45 
I still think Sandwiched Aces is a jaw dropper.

Very simple.

I think we get carried away with our slieghts, and our egos.

For the layman....this trick is a little miracle.
0
Inactive

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 86
Reply with quote  #46 
Had a copy of the Course for years back in Alaska; ended up being one of the things I left behind. Ended up buying it again a few weeks ago. I'd forgotten what they looked like in New Condition lol; mine was pretty beat up. XD
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.