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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #1 
I've got two sources for The Midnight Shift - Michael Vincent's Penguin Lecture and Allan Ackerman's video from the 80s I think (Lybrary.com). Anyway, Michael Vincent's version has the hand rotating back toward the body 180-degrees and then back again. In Ackerman's version, he rotates the deck back 360-degrees, like in an all-around square up - momentarily taking the deck in the right hand and then taking it back into the left.

Both actions work. But which one is correct? I think Steve Draun was the originator and I don't know where he published it first (eventually I'll get that). But it seems to me that even though the 360-degree move is more movement, it is a more natural move, since magician's frequently do that to simply square the deck. The rotating back and then forward again doesn't have much of an explanation.

Thoughts? I'm not really that hung up on this (I get accused of that a lot:-P). I'm just curious. I have a curious mind. And I'm definitely still learning magic, only 19 months into being a magician.

Cheers!

Ken
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #2 
   I didn't think about passes/shifts until I was YEARS into magic!!
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Harry Lorayne

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       Gave that time to practicing/studying effects and presentation.
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Kingman

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Reply with quote  #4 
I must say, asking which is right about any sleight is going to be a never ending discussion. What it all boils down to is which one works for you and the effect you are using it in. I only know the spread pass, and have never used it. Learned it more as something to keep my hands active among other moves. I have multiple sets with some top class effects and not one of them uses the pass. You may be learning it for a specific purpose, in any case, the one that is correct in handling is the one that fits you and your effect. More natural moves are always better, but even they are not written in stone. The way I handle a deck is my "natural" way, I make my sleights and moves fit that, not the other way around. So if part of the move is more natural to the way do things with cards, then use that.


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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #5 
The Midnight shift was originally published in Richard's Almanac in 1984. It was included in Kaufman's "Secrets Draun From the Underground" in 1993.

In Draun's original handling, the deck rotates 180 degrees with the outer short edge rotating toward the body i.e. more or less counterclockwise.

A little gem in the Draun book is the Fan Glimpse. This will fool magicians badly if they're unaware of the move. I got on the inside track on this move by luck. Steve used the glimpse on Dave Solomon and by chance I was in the perfect position to see the mechanics of the move viz. looking over Steve's left shoulder. Dave was totally fooled. He had no idea that Steve had glimpsed his selection.

I fooled a lot of people with the move until the book came out in 1993. 

Mike
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #6 
Ken, I can dig your insatiable curiosity and understand you are compelled to pursue it. After all, curiosity killed the cat, but it was satisfaction brought him back.

The thing about shifts and passes is this: very few magicians execute them well enough to avoid detection. Besides there are countless, much easier controls that accomplish the same result. Jon Racherbaumer offers his analysis of the pass in his column in the September issue of Genii. It's worth a look-see since the man knows of which he speaks.    
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #7 
The Draun pass is reminiscent of Marlo's End Tap pass. They both derive from the Turnover Pass which can be virtually invisible. The only problem with the original turnover pass is justifying the turnover. A well executed classic pass done as the spectators look at you and aren't burning the deck is hard to beat. The appearance is that you simply buried the selection. I like tabling the deck right after the pass. My classic pass won't pass muster if the specs are burning the deck. Once the card is buried and you pause and speak to the specs, they'll relax and look at you. That's the moment..

Once you start double undercutting etc, it's much easier to imagine that you're controlling the card. I think the level of conviction is highest with a classic pass done under the conditions mentioned above.

I definitely like the bluff pass as a very convincing control to 2nd from top. When performed on the person on your left, it's invisible and completely effective IMO. 

Mike
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #8 
I'm late on this but thanks for the responses! I'm coming back to this move again - reminded by Steven Youell when he asked me to show him my pass:-P. I really like how magical this can look. 

Cheers!

Ken
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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #9 
You have to do it at midnight or it won't work
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magicmann

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Reply with quote  #10 
Ken

I use the midnight shift and was originally shown it by Michael Vincent. He pointed it out to me in Richard's Almanac. This is a  very deceptive shift and well worth the work.

Paul
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #11 
Awesome. Thanks Paul!

Ken
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magicmann

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Reply with quote  #12 
Ken

Its not unlike the shift Steve did at the end of his lecture when he turned the deck over.


Paul
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #13 
Ken, I showed my Midnight Shift to Steve Draun and he gave me a nice compliment, but more importantly, he explained the motivation for the turning of the deck. It is a magical gesture during a routine. He conditions the audience such that each time he turns the deck, the magic happens. The motion that executes the pass is therefore justified within the context of the routine. Forgive the latenight snacking! I practice in the middle of the night sometimes.
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #14 
That makes so much sense. Thanks! I was under the impression that the explanation for the move is doing an all-around square up. But it does look a little odd for that. Very cool, thanks. And I definitely get the night practice and the snacks:-P. I do most of my move practicing in front of the TV. And now that I'm recovering from broken foot surgery, I have a lot of time to just sit here.

BTW, that performance in the video was awesome! It makes me realize how badly I was doing it:-P. Now I've adjusted what I'm doing based on your video and it's much more smooth. Thanks!

Ken
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #15 
The midnight shift works best when you turn a bit to your left. Helps to eliminate some of the bad angles. If you are looking for a good all-around shift, a good classic pass, riffle pass or standard Herrmann pass is where I'd focus my time. However, in general, I believe in learning lots of variants as some fit situations better than others. The midnight shift is good for making a reversed card come to the top or for a color change at the face of the deck. Good luck!
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #16 
Thanks Ray.
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ
The midnight shift works best when you turn a bit to your left. Helps to eliminate some of the bad angles. If you are looking for a good all-around shift, a good classic pass, riffle pass or standard Herrmann pass is where I'd focus my time. However, in general, I believe in learning lots of variants as some fit situations better than others. The midnight shift is good for making a reversed card come to the top or for a color change at the face of the deck. Good luck!


Ray, I went researching your suggestions last night. I got a copy of  More Card Manipulations. Can you clarify something for me? It sounds in the description of both Riffle Pass descriptions that the cards are actually being dribbled/dropped from one hand to the other stack. Is that right? 

Thanks!

Ken
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #18 
Actually Ken, the P.W. Miller Pass is a fairly odd duck.  The top half is off to the side and riffled by itself and the formerly bottom packet hinges up and comes down on TOP of the just riffled packet.  I will recommend that you read the description and then file it away.  It is not a great method.  I'm sure Mr. Miller could make it look good, but there are much better options.

The first one, an admittedly sparse description of what is a great pass, is one to really study.  The basics are all there, but you must keep working at it to get the subtleties and timing down.  Also, notice that the riffling is done with the second finger.  Look at a lot of the riffle passes on video and notice how many riffle off of the thumb, or riffle with both fingers and thumb, front and back.

To answer your specific question, the audience is obviously not supposed to understand that the deck has been secretly cut during the process, so a gap between the packets is to be avoided.  If you separate the hands, then it becomes a dribble action.  By the way, the dribble is a great cover and can be combined with the Herrmann Pass mechanics to good effect.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #19 
By the way, isn't it interesting how much video and paper is dedicated to secretly cutting the deck?  That's all a pass is at its core.  Cutting the pack.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #20 
But as a card control a good pass is hard to beat. The card seems to be in the middle of the deck and the deck can be tabled. If you shuffle after the card is replaced, it can easily be interpreted as control. Especially after you've previously found cards or made them come to the top etc.

"Here - put your card in the middle. I'll put the cards here." or "Here - put your card in the middle. I'll shuffle and 'lose' your card in the deck."

It's not a big deal, but I think a solid pass is hard to beat as a card control.

Mike
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magicmann

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Reply with quote  #21 
Mike

I agree, I have always preferred the pass as a card control.

Paul
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
But as a card control a good pass is hard to beat. The card seems to be in the middle of the deck and the deck can be tabled. If you shuffle after the card is replaced, it can easily be interpreted as control. Especially after you've previously found cards or made them come to the top etc.

"Here - put your card in the middle. I'll put the cards here." or "Here - put your card in the middle. I'll shuffle and 'lose' your card in the deck."

It's not a big deal, but I think a solid pass is hard to beat as a card control.

Mike


I totally agree and that is why I use several of them for various conditions.  But when I do the pass, I set the deck down and do not do any further "mixing".  If I feel it is necessary, I sometimes will cop the selection and hand the deck out for shuffling.  That blows folks away because now they think you have zero idea of where the card is.
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #23 
Thanks Ray. I agree about the dribble being an awesome cover. I recently learned to improve my bluff pass with a dribble and that REALLY helps to sell it.

Ken
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Claudio

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Reply with quote  #24 
Here's a demo by Steve Draun himself.

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #25 
Claudio, thanks for sharing that.  BTW, that is the optimum angle for the move.  Turned slightly left.  Nothing wrong with that and I'm not knocking the move, but all moves have a sweet spot and that is it.
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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #26 
A good book to read about misdirection--which can help with a pass--is Gary Kurtz' Leading With Your Head. Just the chapter about active/ relax state is worth buying it for. 
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #27 
Another vote for Leading with Your Head. Excellent stuff.

Mike
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luvisi

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Reply with quote  #28 
From http://forums.geniimagazine.com/viewtopic.php?t=3834

Steve Draun says:
Quote:
I would like to point out that Richard did not (as he knows) perform the midnight shift correctly in his otherwise excellent tape on the pass. The move does emulate the all around square up action. To clear up and further misconceptions, a few minutes ago, I put a movie of a personal performance of the move on my web site, at stevedraun.com.


Richard Kaufman says:
Quote:
Steve's correct in the sense that I did not perform The Midnight Shift as HE does it on my tape. That does NOT mean I performed it incorrectly--just differently.


Andru
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Steven Youell

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Reply with quote  #29 
Richard Kaufman says:
Quote:
Steve's correct in the sense that I did not perform The Midnight Shift as
HE does it on my tape. That does NOT mean I performed it incorrectly--just differently.

There are so many opportunities for scathing humor here that I am overwhelmed. Therefore,
I have decided not to participate. And for me, that's a rarity.

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roymcbrayer

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Reply with quote  #30 
Both Steve Draun's book and DVD's go into good detail on the Midnight Shift.  I first learned it from lessons with Michael Vincent then went through it in Mr. Draun's book and his DVD's.  I think it is on the third DVD but I can't remember for certain.  But, I had a hard time making it work for me holding the deck to the left since, if I had a small audience,  I had no reason to turn left slightly (as you would if speaking to someone on your left).   So, I adapted it and do it about waist height in front of me.  I probably can't really call it the Midnight Shift anymore but that is where I started.  Between band sets, I once asked the guitar player to video me doing some card magic since I needed some clips to send back to my instructor.   In one clip, he ended up filming me from the left at about a 45 degree angle and I couldn't really ask him to change positions.   I did the Homing Card and had to do the shift. I was pleasantly surprised that it really couldn't be seen even from the 45 deg left angle at which he was filming.  In fact, my instructor watched it and  asked me "When did you do the move?  I never saw you do it."   It was one of those rare moments where I felt I finally performed a sleight  at an acceptable level.
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