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KenTheriot

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What are your favorite table-hopping coin routines? In less than a week, I'll be doing a bunch of table-hopping and I have a chop cup routine down, which will be my opener. And I figure I can do a card trick or two. 

My primary area of magic though, so far, has been coin magic. But as I've said in other threads, my experience has been exclusively friends, family SAM club (not Sam's Club:-P) meetings. In most of those circumstances I've been sort of standing in front of people with or without a performing/busking table in front of me. 

As I was thinking about the festival next week, it occurred to me that not all (maybe not even most) of the coin routines and tricks I know will be well suited for performing for table-hopping. My main concern is angles (the tables will be rectangular). But you may have run into other issues that make this kind of coin trick less than desirable.

So far, I've decided that the Roth Flurry, Tenkai Pennies, Mr. Clean Coins Across, and 3-Fly would work, since all the action takes place in my hands. But I am not sure how well it would work to put down a portable close-up pad and do something like Buckley/Roth Coins To Cup or Roth Winged Silver would work.

Thoughts? Suggestions?

Thanks!

Ken

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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #2 
If you have the room on the  table, why not. You could even do Matrix, or any coin assembly.

For table hoping, Hopping Half is perfect. Two Copper, One Silver, that kind of stuff
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #3 
Will they be eating at these tables?
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #4 
Not eating, most likely. The tavern serves some snacks. they may well have drinks. 

Thanks Michael for the tips.

Ken
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Magic-Aly

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So Charlie, a couple things.  Do you have final loads that you reveal in your chop cup routine such as a big ball or balls or perhaps fruit?  If so, I would not recommend doing the chop cup as an opener.  The chop cup with the revelation of the final load(s) is so strong that in my opinion, it should be your closer, not an opener.  This is particularly true if all or most of what you will be doing other than the chop cup are coin routines, none of which no matter how well performed is likely to play as strong as the chop cup.  

I know coin magic is your forte and you have asked for suggestions specifically as to coin routines you could use in table hopping, and you have received good suggestions, but do you not have a good card trick or two you could also perform?. That way, your act at each table will be more balanced.  Ideally, I would open with a coin routine or two, then a card routine and end with the chop cup.  This is just my own personal opinion based on over twenty years of experience table hopping.
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #6 
Magic-Aly, that's a really good point! You're right about the reaction to the chop cup, which does have final loads. I appreciate your advice. It's the reason I asked this - to get advice form experienced table performers like you. Awesome stuff.

So - and yes, I have several card tricks in my repertoire - you think, say, 2 coin tricks, 2 card tricks, and chop cup to finish? Or maybe 1, 1 and chop cup?

Thanks again!

Ken
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damianjennings

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Reply with quote  #7 
Totally agree about closing with chop cup. I open with 3fly usually. My routine take just a minute and a half. So it grabs their attention and shows I'm not rubbish
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #8 

You know, there are no real rules. I believe Don Alan habitually opened with the Chop Cup. It is actually a very good opener. And as stated it can also be a good closer. It all depends on your personality, your repertoire and your performing ability. Oh, and the atmosphere at your venue. After a while you get an instinct as to what routine is best for you. For example I think the regular chop cup routine would be good as an opener but my gut feeling tells me that the Larry Jennings chop cup routine would be better placed elsewhere in a performer's act, possibly as a closer.

Generally speaking (and only generally) a good opener is something that grabs attention, is visual and under no circumstances should be long winded with nothing much happening.  Keep the longer stuff until later in your set. Your opening trick and your closing trick are the most important ones in your act.

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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenTheriot
Magic-Aly, that's a really good point! You're right about the reaction to the chop cup, which does have final loads. I appreciate your advice. It's the reason I asked this - to get advice form experienced table performers like you. Awesome stuff.

So - and yes, I have several card tricks in my repertoire - you think, say, 2 coin tricks, 2 card tricks, and chop cup to finish? Or maybe 1, 1 and chop cup?

Thanks again!

Ken


You are welcome, Ken!  And I apologize for addressing you as "Charlie."  I am sure you don't travel under an alias. It's funny - I woke up today realizing my mistake.  Let us know how it goes...
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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #10 
Ken, I to am big into coin magic, however I've recently got myself some sponge balls and let me tell you, I think these would kill for walk around stuff! Very easy to carry and almost all the slights used for sponge balls are coin slights. You really only need a couple of effects with them and they get just as good of a reaction as coins or cards. It seems the same basic effects are used by most magicians. The '10 count' and the 'Two in the Hand, One in the Pocket' routine. Both very easy to do if you have a good retention vanish. Bill Malone does a nice little routine with them here:

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mark lewis

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That routine of Bill Malone's reminds me of something that Mike Rogers pointed out. He always felt that once the phase of the sponges in the spectator's hands sequence was over then anything else after that was anti-climatic. And yet there are many routines published which follow that sequence of events. A very common procedure is that after the balls appear in the hands of the spectator you go into the two in the hand and one in the pocket business usually with all the balls disappearing in the end. I was attracted to those routines for a while until I read Mike Rogers opinion on the matter. I think I agree with him. In any event I altered my procedure to take this into account. There really is nothing that can follow the in-the-hands effect.

In the end I more or less did the Slydini routine without the lapping. I always open my trade show set with it as it does tend to draw a crowd. It does follow the thinking of Mike Rogers that anything done after the in-the-hands effect is anti climatic.

The best book on the subject is the one written by Frank Garcia which is not easy to obtain nowadays. It is called the "Encyclopedia of Sponge Ball Magic"

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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #12 
I could not agree more as to the strength of the sponge balls. It is too good not to do. I am sure Rudy would heartily agree, as well.  A routine of course would be great, but seriously, even if you literally did nothing more than just the classic sponge ball effect (which IMHO is by far the strongest), it would be well worth it.  i.e., Do a false pass to your hand with one ball and close the hand, pick up the other ball with the guilty hand, place both balls in the spectator's hand and have them immediately close tight, slowly open your hand to show yours has vanished, and have them open their hand for the revelation that it has joined the ball they were holding, you will see by the reaction that it will be well worth it.  Packs really small and plays huge!
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thanks for the tips on the sponge ball stuff guys! Awesome stuff. I wasn't sure if I was going to use sponge balls since this is a medieval fstival and sponge ball magic is a 20th century thing (though cork balls are totally period). But I may give it a try anyway, based on the strong recommendations.

Thanks again!

Ken
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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #14 
Yeah Ken, I don't think the period police will get you for this one, and I think because it's such an unassuming prop no one will really care that much. You could maybe say that they're a very special kind of sponge fungus only found in the wild's of (insert Kingdom name here) which posses special powers, etc, etc. since you can get them in pretty much any colour you could go with green. Remember, it's the performance you're selling. Spin a good medieval yarn to go with the trick! [biggrin]
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damianjennings

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Reply with quote  #15 
I agree wholly with me Lewis. The thing is over after they have the balls in their hand. It was my opener for years.

Produce ball
Split it into two
One in each of my hands, one travels
I in their hand, one in mine. They now have two

Finish.
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #16 
Awesome! Thanks Robert and Damian!

Ken
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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #17 
Going back to the chop cup, since it is a medieval festival, you could introduce it a "Ye Olde Cup and Ball Game, a magical game that the wandering sorcerers back in Medieval times used to play with people in the pubs and taverns throughout Europe.  It was always a favorite among the patrons, especially after a quaff of ale or two.  This is what the old drinking cups used to look like."  Something along those lines. Just a thought... 

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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #18 
Oh yeah, the cup I have is sort of plain pewter and would easily pass for a period prop. 

I've been wondering now though about the other thing - the warnings agains starting with a trick like the chop cup with such a big surprise ending (the big load followed by the OTHER big load. But the same warnings were issued about the sponge balls in the spectators hands. 

I was putting together all this advise and tentatively planning a little table set and wondered how I should incorporate BOTH the chop cup AND the sponge ball routine, since they both play big. It seems like a catch 22 - don't follow either trick with anything:-P. but they are both really good! Is it advisable to simply choose only one for a particular table and alternate the "big ending" tricks from table set to table set?

Ken
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #19 
Oh yeah, the cup I have is sort of plain pewter and would easily pass for a period prop. 

I've been wondering now though about the other thing - the warnings agains starting with a trick like the chop cup with such a big surprise ending (the big load followed by the OTHER big load). But the same warnings were issued about the sponge balls in the spectators hands. 

I was putting together all this advise and tentatively planning a little table set and wondered how I should incorporate BOTH the chop cup AND the sponge ball routine, since they both play big. It seems like a catch 22 - don't follow either trick with anything:-P. but they are both really good! Is it advisable to simply choose only one for a particular table and alternate the "big ending" tricks from table set to table set?

Ken
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Chessmann

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Reply with quote  #20 
The Sun Moon routine, Samoya, can be very beautiful, and it is all in the hands.
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #21 
I don't have that one in my repertoire yet, though I have Geoff Latta doing it on the NYCM Seminar DVDs. I'll be doing his Copper-Silver Coins Across instead, which is superb. It includes an ending in the spec's hands, and doesn't over-rely on the gimmick. I like it a lot.

Thanks for the tip.

Ken
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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenTheriot
Oh yeah, the cup I have is sort of plain pewter and would easily pass for a period prop. 

I've been wondering now though about the other thing - the warnings agains starting with a trick like the chop cup with such a big surprise ending (the big load followed by the OTHER big load). But the same warnings were issued about the sponge balls in the spectators hands. 

I was putting together all this advise and tentatively planning a little table set and wondered how I should incorporate BOTH the chop cup AND the sponge ball routine, since they both play big. It seems like a catch 22 - don't follow either trick with anything:-P. but they are both really good! Is it advisable to simply choose only one for a particular table and alternate the "big ending" tricks from table set to table set?

Ken


As a suggestion, you could open with the sponge balls and close with the chop cup. I believe the first and last tricks should be the strongest. Just my personal opinion. The sponge balls (short and sweet) will get them laughing and relaxed and establish you as really good, as it happens in their hands and blows them away.  As I mentioned, even just a nice production (e.g. "sawing" one into two as Damien mentioned) and then one phase where it vanishes from your hand and ends up joining the other in their hand would be awesome.  

My own mentor and teacher taught me that the ultimate goal is to make every trick a "closer."  
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #23 
Thanks Magic-Aly. that makes sense and I can absolutely do that. I already do 2 sponge ball tricks that match that perfectly. Awesome. Thanks!

Ken 
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #24 

This is how I use the sponge balls to stop people at a trade show:

https://marklewistradeshowmagiciansecrets.wordpress.com/2015/08/01/how-to-gather-a-crowd/

And here is my routine in action. I cannot remember if I have posted this before but if so it won't hurt to see it again. I follow Mike Roger's dictum of not following the in hands thing with any other sponge ball sequence. The sponge ball routine is right at the start of the video, after about 30 seconds or so.

https://marklewistradeshowmagiciansecrets.wordpress.com/2015/09/01/more-of-mark-lewis-in-action/

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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #25 
Mark that's a great routine you have there. I especially like the little ball roll you do in the fingers into the retention vanish. Very nice!
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #26 
Yes. It is a beautiful retention of vision vanish which I learned from the Frank Garcia Encyclopedia of Sponge Balls which is a magnificent book. Garcia wrote some great books. I just wish he had been a better writer. I have seen potentially magnificent books ruined by the deficiency of the author's writing ability. I still feel sad about the Francis Carlyle book which had fantastic material therein but it was so badly written. Alas not everyone can be Harry Lorayne and have his capabilities as a writer.
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark lewis

That routine of Bill Malone's reminds me of something that Mike Rogers pointed out. He always felt that once the phase of the sponges in the spectator's hands sequence was over then anything else after that was anti-climatic. And yet there are many routines published which follow that sequence of events. A very common procedure is that after the balls appear in the hands of the spectator you go into the two in the hand and one in the pocket business usually with all the balls disappearing in the end. I was attracted to those routines for a while until I read Mike Rogers opinion on the matter. I think I agree with him. In any event I altered my procedure to take this into account. There really is nothing that can follow the in-the-hands effect.

In the end I more or less did the Slydini routine without the lapping. I always open my trade show set with it as it does tend to draw a crowd. It does follow the thinking of Mike Rogers that anything done after the in-the-hands effect is anti climatic.

The best book on the subject is the one written by Frank Garcia which is not easy to obtain nowadays. It is called the "Encyclopedia of Sponge Ball Magic"


Johnny Paul felt the same way.
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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #28 
MAGICFISH WROTE: "A very common procedure is that after the balls appear in the hands of the spectator you go into the two in the hand and one in the pocket business usually with all the balls disappearing in the end. I was attracted to those routines for a while until I read Mike Rogers opinion on the matter. I think I agree with him. In any event I altered my procedure to take this into account. There really is nothing that can follow the in-the-hands effect."

I agree with this up to a point.  Honestly, I was never drawn to the two in the hand, one in the pocket procedure in any context, be it coins or sponge balls.  It bears the hallmark of "look how clever I am" or "Gotcha," which I personally seek to avoid.  This being said, while the balls appearing in the hands of the spectator is very strong, and I would agree that 
weaker, anti-climatic sequences should not follow, there are exceptionally strong effects that can follow a sponge ball vanishing from the magician's hand and magically joining the (alleged) one ball in the spectator's hand.

A prominent example would be Eugene Burger's fantastic sponge ball routine, which culminates with 20 little sponge balls appearing in the spectator's hand.  That obviously trumps even the aforementioned standard strong effect of two larger balls appearing in the spectator's hand, which of course, Eugene does first.

Generally, I prefer to do the multiplying rabbits if there is table space available.  (If not, I do a very quick sponge ball routine, following the Mike Rogers approach, and yes, it gets a very strong reaction).  But personally, what I love about the rabbits (as do the spectators) is the personality factor of a rabbit versus a ball, and the entertainment that can be milked out it.  

In my experience, nothing beats the effect of a woman opening her hand at the end, only to have 10 little rabbits pop out as she screams and general hilarity breaks out among the spectators.  Yet, you can still first do the very strong move of a large rabbit vanishing from your hand and joining the "one" held by the spectator.
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damianjennings

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Reply with quote  #29 
I agree. Rabbits > balls. 
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark lewis
Yes. It is a beautiful retention of vision vanish which I learned from the Frank Garcia Encyclopedia of Sponge Balls which is a magnificent book. Garcia wrote some great books. I just wish he had been a better writer. I have seen potentially magnificent books ruined by the deficiency of the author's writing ability. I still feel sad about the Francis Carlyle book which had fantastic material therein but it was so badly written. Alas not everyone can be Harry Lorayne and have his capabilities as a writer.

Gary Ouellet also has a wonderful Sponge ball retention vanish in print. I believe its called the Push Pinch Vanish.
It took me a while to work through all the material in the Carlyle book but I got through it.
It was the changing Fonts and colours that distracted me. Great book though.
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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #31 
Sorry were taking over your conversation Ken! all this talk of sponge balls [smile] I just wanted to mention that Jay Noblezada's sponge ball DVD's are pretty good. He shows you all the most used slights, vanishes etc. and takes you through a few routines but by far the best section is when Jay sits down with Gary Darwin and Gary demonstrates his own take on some vanishes and sleights which are wonderful. Worth a look for sure.
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #32 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic-Aly
MAGICFISH WROTE: "A very common procedure is that after the balls appear in the hands of the spectator you go into the two in the hand and one in the pocket business usually with all the balls disappearing in the end. I was attracted to those routines for a while until I read Mike Rogers opinion on the matter. I think I agree with him. In any event I altered my procedure to take this into account. There really is nothing that can follow the in-the-hands effect."

I agree with this up to a point.  Honestly, I was never drawn to the two in the hand, one in the pocket procedure in any context, be it coins or sponge balls.  It bears the hallmark of "look how clever I am" or "Gotcha," which I personally seek to avoid.  This being said, while the balls appearing in the hands of the spectator is very strong, and I would agree that 
weaker, anti-climatic sequences should not follow, there are exceptionally strong effects that can follow a sponge ball vanishing from the magician's hand and magically joining the (alleged) one ball in the spectator's hand.

A prominent example would be Eugene Burger's fantastic sponge ball routine, which culminates with 20 little sponge balls appearing in the spectator's hand.  That obviously trumps even the aforementioned standard strong effect of two larger balls appearing in the spectator's hand, which of course, Eugene does first.

Generally, I prefer to do the multiplying rabbits if there is table space available.  (If not, I do a very quick sponge ball routine, following the Mike Rogers approach, and yes, it gets a very strong reaction).  But personally, what I love about the rabbits (as do the spectators) is the personality factor of a rabbit versus a ball, and the entertainment that can be milked out it.  

In my experience, nothing beats the effect of a woman opening her hand at the end, only to have 10 little rabbits pop out as she screams and general hilarity breaks out among the spectators.  Yet, you can still first do the very strong move of a large rabbit vanishing from your hand and joining the "one" held by the spectator.

 

Actually Magic Fish did not write your opening paragraph. I did!  As for the Eugene Burger routine I strongly suspect it is or is nearly identical to my routine but instead of finishing with one grapefruit size ball he uses the standard finish of about 20 or so little sponges. I have done it that way in the past too but I hate losing the little balls and it takes too much time to put them away. Just using the large sponge at the finish is good enough for me and the reaction is strong.

When I do a trade show I work pretty continuously rather that subscribe to the normal practice of working for 15 minutes then stopping for a break and starting up again after another 15 minutes. I would go crazy if I had to do that because you lose the momentum. So I have to get rid of the mess of the sponge balls. This is more difficult to do if you are producing 20 of them so the large ball is more practical for me.


You can get good results with just using two balls. However, I like to repeat the sequence with three balls, then four balls then the large grapefruit ball as a climax. The reaction and excitement builds that way.

I have tried rabbits and I have tried balls. For me personally the balls seem to go over better. I also think they are a little more visual and you are not restricted to the usual patter story.

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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #33 
Sorry for misquoting MagicFish and not crediting you with the quote, Mark.  In any event, I have no real disagreement with any of your points.  I think that, as you have pointed out on numerous occasions, it comes down to personal preference, what suits your own performing style, and above all, the reactions of the LAYMEN (as opposed to the opinions of magicians).
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #34 
Indeed.
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krissheppard

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Reply with quote  #35 
The sponge ball routine I use is the one right out of Mark Wilson's Encyclopedia of Magic. The structure is great and you end clean with all the balls vanishing. Often times I take out the 10 count though as it seems to make the routine a little too long. That's a personal preference though. 

For coin stuff, have you seen Kostya Kimlat's Okito Box Routine? I perform it all the time and love it! I think something like that might fit in well with the special venue. 
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #36 
One of my all time favourite coin effects for walk-around and Table Hopping is Roger Klause's Miser's Cornucopia. It is a stunning closeup trick that fools, amuses and delights.
It is done entirely in the spectator's hands and it is quick, fun and magical.
And it is a perfect trick to introduce the student to Klause's theory of half-moves. A theory adopted and practiced by Alan Ackerman, John Carney, and many other masters of closeup sleight of hand.
A strong trick from a legendary book.
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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #37 
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicfish
One of my all time favourite coin effects for walk-around and Table Hopping is Roger Klause's Miser's Cornucopia. It is a stunning closeup trick that fools, amuses and delights. It is done entirely in the spectator's hands and it is quick, fun and magical. And it is a perfect trick to introduce the student to Klause's theory of half-moves. A theory adopted and practiced by Alan Ackerman, John Carney, and many other masters of closeup sleight of hand. A strong trick from a legendary book.


Is that the wonderful routine where Roger borrows a one dollar bill saying he thought at first it might be one of the old silver certificates, where you could take it to a bank and exchange it for a dollar's worth of real silver.  Then the borrowed dollar is made into a cone, a makeshift cornucopia...etc.? It sure sounds like it.

I had the honor of learning the effect from Roger himself at a lecture in 1994, and have been doing it ever since.  TT is never suspected.  It is truly a winner!  Great recommendation!
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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #38 
That's it Magic-Aly. A beautiful piece of closeup wizardry. How special for you to have learned it from the master himself.
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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #39 
Yes MagicFish, truly a lovely piece, with a very magical surprise for the spectator, and those old silver mercury dimes have such a beautiful energy to them!  
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Robert Parris

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Reply with quote  #40 
After looking for Encyclopedia of Sponge Ball Magic, I can safely say I'll never be buying that book as the cheapest I've seen it is for over two hundred dollars! Hopefully, one day it will come back out in a new edition and the price will be lower. However, I did come across a DVD called Encyclopedia of Sponge Ball Magic by Ben Salinas. I'm guessing this is the Garcia book put on to DVD much like he did with Bobo's book. I think he did a fair job with the Bobo dvd so I might be tempted to buy the sponge ball one as well. It certainly seems very comprehensive.
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #41 
I am amazed at the price of the Garcia book. A pity because it probably is the best book ever written on the sponges. He did write a small booklet for Magic Inc at one point on the subject but it wouldn't be in the same league. Hopefully you will find it a bit cheaper somewhere else.
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Barry Allen

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Reply with quote  #42 
My favourite walk around coin routine would have to be Patrick Page's Coins thru Table.

- 4 normal coins (that may be borrowed) are used

- can be performed standing - which in the UK, accounts for most of our working environment

- can even be performed on a glass top table; or even with two spectators holding a tray

- completely angle-proof

I have been performing it for 35 years; having bought the casette tape (yep, an audio tape and a photo sheet!) from Pat at a convention in 1981.
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Gerald Deutsch

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Reply with quote  #43 

Perverse Coin and Salt Shaker

Effect

1 I borrow a quarter and explain that salt makes it invisible. I sprinkle salt on the quarter and it becomes invisible (vanishes).

I offer to give back the invisible quarter but the owner doesn't want it.

2  I reach into my pocket and get another quarter to give back but on second thought I try to make that invisible too but it doesn't work and I sprinkle more salt but nothing comes out and I look puzzled at the shaker in my right hand and - it's gone.

3  I reach into my pockets looking for the salt shaker and find it in my inside jacket pocket.

4  Looking confused, I put the shaker back on the table and give the spectator the quarter and shake my head, confused.

Background

Much of my magic is done at a dinner table, either socially with friends or at a business meal and a salt shaker is a prop that is always available there.

It is very important here to know just when to do magic (and when not to). In a business session business always comes first but there's usually an opportunity to introduce magic but I believe that it should be impromptu with objects that are available. A salt shaker is one such object.

As a long time student of Slydini, I, of course learned "lapping" (and lapping recovery) and I found that reaching for a salt shaker on my right with my right hand (that has the object to be lapped) is a good way to lap that object. The object is dropped as I move my hand over my lap to get the salt shaker on my right.

Slydini and I had very different personalities and, while there is little magic of his that I  do, he did help me develop effects that fit me.

Anyway, I liked "Sweet and Go" in George Schindler's "Magic with Everyday Objects" and "Sugar and Salt" in Jerry Mentzer's "Close Up Cavalcade Finale" and adopted those ideas to this quick Perverse Magic effect.

The effect is also somewhat similar to Perverse Olives which I posted on the Perverse Magic thread of the Genii Forum on June 1, 2006

The method is posted on the Session Room.  

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phread

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Reply with quote  #44 
I assume the other coin guys here have most of the coin material; bobo, roth, harbottle, kam, etc... If you have those sources and seek something else I suggest to look into is Rune Klan's coin work. If you do table hopping there are plenty of ideas from Rune's 3 pieces of Silver.  Rune's coin work makes a GREAT addition the other material that I'm sure we all have on a book shelf somewhere..
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John Johnson

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Reply with quote  #45 
Ken,

Keep it simple. Stick to familiar routines you can do in your sleep. Magi-Aly provided solid advice i.e. Coins, Cards, Chop Cup finish. Btw, sponges have been in use since ancient times!
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phread

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Reply with quote  #46 
Just remembered, danny tong has a table hopping chop cup routine, short and sweet with several good moments.

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Treders

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Reply with quote  #47 
For table hopping I've used the following with great success. 3fly 111 and Elbow,Knee and Neck both by Daryl, copper/silver transpo as part of a coin flurry, Sankeys Mr Clean Coins Across. The thing all these routines have in common is that no table is required.
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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #48 
Ken, If you're still looking for a quick, walk-around coin routine, check out David Williamson's version of Chink-a-Chink from his Sleight of Dave DVD.

It's awesome and I use it all the time!

Rudy

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HexTheDoombunny

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Reply with quote  #49 
Another one you might like as it does not require a table is Kainoa Harbottle's Victorian Coins and Glass. It's a killer and the audience goes nuts for the final phase. It also has the bonus of being remarkably easy to do.
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #50 
I do like that (and have it - the DVD and glass). But I'm not wild about making a spec a stooge. I'm sure I could maybe find an alternative way to do it though, I suppose.

Ideas?

Ken
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