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KenTheriot

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This is kind of a backwards thing:-P. Besides mastering the basic sleights, one would normally decide on what trick they want to learn before learning a very specific move that is not really a trick on its own. But I learned this one move that was so cool, I decided I wanted to learn it absent any actual routine. 

This move is a one-handed coin change. It uses a modified/tilted Ramsay subtlety that conceals a coin very much like a curl-palm/Nowhere Palm. That's one reason this change works so well. Hold one at the fingertips, concealing one in the RS, and with a quick wave of the hand, you're holding a completely different coin and the hand looks empty of any other coin. Really magical.

But now I find myself wanting to make it part of a larger trick so that I don't just say "Hey, watch this," and do a move.

To that end, what advice can the coin folks offer here? Does anyone have a trick they do that contains a one-handed change?

Thanks!

Ken
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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenTheriot
This is kind of a backwards thing:-P. Besides mastering the basic sleights, one would normally decide on what trick they want to learn before learning a very specific move that is not really a trick on its own. But I learned this one move that was so cool, I decided I wanted to learn it absent any actual routine. 

This move is a one-handed coin change. It uses a modified/tilted Ramsay subtlety that conceals a coin very much like a curl-palm/Nowhere Palm. That's one reason this change works so well. Hold one at the fingertips, concealing one in the RS, and with a quick wave of the hand, you're holding a completely different coin and the hand looks empty of any other coin. Really magical.

But now I find myself wanting to make it part of a larger trick so that I don't just say "Hey, watch this," and do a move.

To that end, what advice can the coin folks offer here? Does anyone have a trick they do that contains a one-handed change?

Thanks!

Ken


Hi Ken, Like you...I find that sometimes it's fun to mess around with a new sleight, even if I never plan to actually use it.

This happened recently when I saw MagicFish's video of him doing the Hirata Master Move.  I started playing with it straight away and find that anytime I have a coin...I continue to practice it.

I figure that one day, it just might come in handy. No harm in that [smile]

Rudy

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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #3 
True. Now I have to check out that move you mentioned. You can't just tell me about it without teaching me the move[wink].

Ken
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Rudy Tinoco

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Originally Posted by KenTheriot
True. Now I have to check out that move you mentioned. You can't just tell me about it without teaching me the move[wink].

Ken


Check this out...


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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks. Very cool. Lapping? I wanna know how now (sung to the tune of a whining child)[smile].

Ken
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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #6 
If you have an English penny and a c/s coin  and a half dollar you can do continual changes. Have the c/s in a little plastic thing that coins come in, or any little plastic bag, and the other two coins in the other hand. Do that move and adjust the c/s as you need.[smile]
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Anthony Vinson

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If you can get hold of a copy of Richard Kaufman's Coin Magic there's an excellent David Roth routine at page 46 called Standup Copper/Silver Classic. I used to perform it frequently; not so much anymore. It utilizes a palm change, a shuttle pass, and the Kaps subtly to create a sweet little routine. The coins visibly change from hand to hand several times and there are several different endings listed depending on your style or the circumstances.   
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Magic-Aly

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KEN WROTE: "But now I find myself wanting to make it part of a larger trick so that I don't just say 'Hey, watch this,' and do a move..."

Are you familiar with "Spellbound?" After you do your one-hand change, grab the visible coin in french drop position with your other hand, as you let the guilty hand fall casually to your side (or to the table, if sitting).  Bringing attention to the coin that is held in French drop position, bring your guilty hand up, and under cover of doing so get the coin the hand holds into either thumb palm or purse palm.  Do the spellbound change, letting the visible coin fall into finger palm and leaving the other coin in its place.  You have now "changed" the coin back to what it was originally. (*I have also seen magicians do the spellbound change concealing a coin in finger palm, as opposed to thumb palm or purse palm, which can be OK, but of course the hand does not look flat)

To clean up, hold up the hand that is now concealing a coin 
in finger palm, with your index finger pointing up, as if to say, "Now watch this" (and/or literally say words to that effect).  The coin should be concealed in Ramsey subtlety position at this point.  Then reach into your pocket and grab a pen (perhaps justifying this by saying something like, "I have a magic wand").  Leaving the coin behind in the pocket you come out with the pen.  Do a Striking Vanish (David Williamson), "vanishing" the remaining coin.

At this point,you have a number of options.  For brevity's sake, I will only point out a couple. One is to simply deposit pen and concealed coin in a pocket and you are done.  Another option could be to place the pen in your other hand and reproduce the coin from anywhere you like. (e.g from behind a child's ear, from behind your knee or elbow, or just from the air).  You could then just end, handing it to them to examine, and saying something like, "It's a very strange coin, wouldn't you agree?"  Or alternatively, you could do the old (but effective) bit where you say "I will vanish it" on the count of three. On "three," you leave the pen behind your ear and when you come down with your hand, it turns out the pen has vanished, as opposed to the coin. You can act confused and just pocket the coin. (Gerald might agree that this sequence exemplifies "perverse magic.")  They may eventually see the pen on your ear, but you can just act like you had no idea it was there; act relieved and thank them, saying something like, "Good, I may need that wand again sometime." (more perversity, and you will get a laugh).

The foregoing are just some ideas among a multitude of possibilities, but hopefully it will get your creative juices flowing... 



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Unfinished Sentenc

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Reply with quote  #9 
I'm practicing a copper/silver transpo routine right now that uses the Crimp change (a variation of the De Manche Change from Hay's Amateur Magician's Handbook). 
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michaelblue
If you have an English penny and a c/s coin  and a half dollar you can do continual changes. Have the c/s in a little plastic thing that coins come in, or any little plastic bag, and the other two coins in the other hand. Do that move and adjust the c/s as you need.[smile]


Michael. That sounds great! I'm having trouble visualizing it though. I don't know what you mean by that little plastic thing. And what would the effect be?

Thanks.

Ken
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony Vinson
If you can get hold of a copy of Richard Kaufman's Coin Magic there's an excellent David Roth routine at page 46 called Standup Copper/Silver Classic. I used to perform it frequently; not so much anymore. It utilizes a palm change, a shuttle pass, and the Kaps subtly to create a sweet little routine. The coins visibly change from hand to hand several times and there are several different endings listed depending on your style or the circumstances.   


Thanks Anthony. I actually do have that book. I'll look at that.

Cheers!

Ken
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic-Aly

KEN WROTE: "But now I find myself wanting to make it part of a larger trick so that I don't just say 'Hey, watch this,' and do a move..."

Are you familiar with "Spellbound?" After you do your one-hand change, grab the visible coin in french drop position with your other hand, as you let the guilty hand fall casually to your side (or to the table, if sitting).  Bringing attention to the coin that is held in French drop position, bring your guilty hand up, and under cover of doing so get the coin the hand holds into either thumb palm or purse palm.  Do the spellbound change, letting the visible coin fall into finger palm and leaving the other coin in its place.  You have now "changed" the coin back to what it was originally. (*I have also seen magicians do the spellbound change concealing a coin in finger palm, as opposed to thumb palm or purse palm, which can be OK, but of course the hand does not look flat)

To clean up, hold up the hand that is now concealing a coin 
in finger palm, with your index finger pointing up, as if to say, "Now watch this" (and/or literally say words to that effect).  The coin should be concealed in Ramsey subtlety position at this point.  Then reach into your pocket and grab a pen (perhaps justifying this by saying something like, "I have a magic wand").  Leaving the coin behind in the pocket you come out with the pen.  Do a Striking Vanish (David Williamson), "vanishing" the remaining coin.

At this point,you have a number of options.  For brevity's sake, I will only point out a couple. One is to simply deposit pen and concealed coin in a pocket and you are done.  Another option could be to place the pen in your other hand and reproduce the coin from anywhere you like. (e.g from behind a child's ear, from behind your knee or elbow, or just from the air).  You could then just end, handing it to them to examine, and saying something like, "It's a very strange coin, wouldn't you agree?"  Or alternatively, you could do the old (but effective) bit where you say "I will vanish it" on the count of three. On "three," you leave the pen behind your ear and when you come down with your hand, it turns out the pen has vanished, as opposed to the coin. You can act confused and just pocket the coin. (Gerald might agree that this sequence exemplifies "perverse magic.")  They may eventually see the pen on your ear, but you can just act like you had no idea it was there; act relieved and thank them, saying something like, "Good, I may need that wand again sometime." (more perversity, and you will get a laugh).

The foregoing are just some ideas among a multitude of possibilities, but hopefully it will get your creative juices flowing... 



Awesome!!! Thanks for those ideas. I already can do every one of those sleights individually. I love the Strike Vanish with a pen/pencil. I drop less often than a ball with a wand[smile].

I'll eventually get to the point where I can put these things together like that. Need to practice just that I guess.

Anyway, thanks again!

Ken
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unfinished Sentenc
I'm practicing a copper/silver transpo routine right now that uses the Crimp change (a variation of the De Manche Change from Hay's Amateur Magician's Handbook). 


Yes! I learned it from MB (Marion Boykin). It's really a great little move. Do you mind sharing what your routine entails?

Thanks!

Ken
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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #14 
The effect would be that the two coins change places magically. The plastic thing is what my c/s coin came in, about the size of a half dollar. The coin fits real snug inside. But if you have a small baggie you can do the same.

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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michaelblue
The effect would be that the two coins change places magically. The plastic thing is what my c/s coin came in, about the size of a half dollar. The coin fits real snug inside. But if you have a small baggie you can do the same.



Ah, I see. Thanks!

Ken
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #16 
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Originally Posted by Magic-Aly
... and under cover of doing so get the coin the hand holds into either thumb palm or purse palm.  


Wow, purse palm is a bit more difficult with a Morgan silver dollar:-P. It's definitely the best sleight for this though. My crimp changes are more difficult with half-dollar coins. Thumb palm just isn't quite right either. I think front palm might be the ticket for the Morgans.

BTW, I'm using a dollar-sized copper bullion coin with the Peace Dollar design on it for the "other" coin...just in case anyone was wondering[smile].

Ken
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Unfinished Sentenc

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenTheriot


Yes! I learned it from MB (Marion Boykin). It's really a great little move. Do you mind sharing what your routine entails?

Thanks!

Ken


It's a slight modification of Marion Boykin's "MB Transpo" from his "Short Pockets". It has a few more tricks in that downlad that use the crimp change.


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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #18 
Cool. Thanks. I have his video for that. I'll play with it.

Thanks again!

Ken
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic-Aly

KEN WROTE: "But now I find myself wanting to make it part of a larger trick so that I don't just say 'Hey, watch this,' and do a move..."

Are you familiar with "Spellbound?" After you do your one-hand change, grab the visible coin in french drop position with your other hand, as you let the guilty hand fall casually to your side (or to the table, if sitting).  Bringing attention to the coin that is held in French drop position, bring your guilty hand up, and under cover of doing so get the coin the hand holds into either thumb palm or purse palm.  Do the spellbound change, letting the visible coin fall into finger palm and leaving the other coin in its place.  You have now "changed" the coin back to what it was originally. (*I have also seen magicians do the spellbound change concealing a coin in finger palm, as opposed to thumb palm or purse palm, which can be OK, but of course the hand does not look flat)

To clean up, hold up the hand that is now concealing a coin 
in finger palm, with your index finger pointing up, as if to say, "Now watch this" (and/or literally say words to that effect).  The coin should be concealed in Ramsey subtlety position at this point.  Then reach into your pocket and grab a pen (perhaps justifying this by saying something like, "I have a magic wand").  Leaving the coin behind in the pocket you come out with the pen.  Do a Striking Vanish (David Williamson), "vanishing" the remaining coin.

At this point,you have a number of options.  For brevity's sake, I will only point out a couple. One is to simply deposit pen and concealed coin in a pocket and you are done.  Another option could be to place the pen in your other hand and reproduce the coin from anywhere you like. (e.g from behind a child's ear, from behind your knee or elbow, or just from the air).  You could then just end, handing it to them to examine, and saying something like, "It's a very strange coin, wouldn't you agree?"  Or alternatively, you could do the old (but effective) bit where you say "I will vanish it" on the count of three. On "three," you leave the pen behind your ear and when you come down with your hand, it turns out the pen has vanished, as opposed to the coin. You can act confused and just pocket the coin. (Gerald might agree that this sequence exemplifies "perverse magic.")  They may eventually see the pen on your ear, but you can just act like you had no idea it was there; act relieved and thank them, saying something like, "Good, I may need that wand again sometime." (more perversity, and you will get a laugh).

The foregoing are just some ideas among a multitude of possibilities, but hopefully it will get your creative juices flowing... 



I just wanted to let you know that I have used your routine above MANY times. It has become one of my go-to impromptu coin routines. THANK YOU so much for the idea!

-Ken
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