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Jeremy Salow

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Reply with quote  #1 
I was leafing through the great Royal Road again, as I do occasionally. This time I was looking through the forces and rediscovered the Two-Card Force. It's on p. 207 of the 1999 Dover edition.

This force is fantastic!  It's simple, and the basic movements create a natural optical illusion (for lack of a better term) hiding what's really going on. This works great as a two-card force, but could work just as well with one. Although I could see how if you were to use it as a two card location/reveal, the revelation of the second card would help deflect from any possible suspicion of the first (which I think would be unlikely as it looks for fair).  I have some subtleties bouncing around in my head that may make it look even more legitimate and fair, but I'm hesitant to mention them until I can see if they really make it any better, or just detract from a force that seems almost perfect to me.

I've studied Royal Road extensively over the years, but somehow I must have overlooked this, initially thinking it was nothing. I'm glad I saw it again! If you have Royal Road (and if you don't...why the hell not?), check it out.

Does/has anyone used this in performance?
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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #2 
It's great to feel that way about a move.  Glad you discovered (or rediscovered) this.  A deceptive force is like gold. It is a very advantageous situation when (an apparently free) selection can be replaced in the deck anywhere the spectator chooses and the deck can even be shuffled by spectator to his/her heart's content. There is no situation wherein spectator has a stronger conviction that his (apparently freely) chosen card is truly lost in the pack.  In my view, generally speaking, the stronger the spectator conviction, the stronger the revelation.  And obviously there are many other wonderful applications for a good force.

I am not personally familiar with the move (although I own and have gone through the Royal Road to Card Magic Book).  I am going to look it up in my book immediately.  Thanks for the recommendation.
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Deckster

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you.
That's good, simple enough and I wonder what the provenance is and whether we see that in print elsewhere. What effects would be well served by this move? Used as force or revelation? I think it'd be useful in a multiple selection routine. It could be used perhaps as a shortcut for anniversary waltz. I am curious to see the posts that follow in this thread and what applications to effects people come up with.
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Jeremy Salow

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Reply with quote  #4 
I've been thinking about a different use for this move. Instead of using it as a two-card selection force, use it to force one card but it gives you two possible options. You know both possible cards, but you are only asking the spectator to pick one. When the spectator sticks the marker card in, mention how he actually stopped at two cards, would he like the top or bottom?  This gives the spectator greater illusion of choice but it doesn't matter which card he chooses-you know both. In addition the decision between the two cards creates temporal misdirection.

What do you think?
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Deckster

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremy Salow
I've been thinking about a different use for this move. Instead of using it as a two-card selection force, use it to force one card but it gives you two possible options. You know both possible cards, but you are only asking the spectator to pick one. When the spectator sticks the marker card in, mention how he actually stopped at two cards, would he like the top or bottom?  This gives the spectator greater illusion of choice but it doesn't matter which card he chooses-you know both. In addition the decision between the two cards creates temporal misdirection.

What do you think?


I like it!
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Claudio

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Reply with quote  #6 
RRTCM is a source of gems and I often go back to it for inspiration.

I use that force, but mostly to force one card, in conjunction with the ECT force The Perfect Score Card Force, described in the Card Force section.

Using either technique, it does not matter whether the spectator inserts the card above or under the break. Plus it's easier to set-up the forced cards using an OHS rather than a pass.
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Jeremy Salow

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claudio
Using either technique, it does not matter whether the spectator inserts the card above or under the break.


The only way I can see it work if they insert the card below the break is to turn the deck face up and then do the move. Is that what you do? In that situation I can't see a way to do it keeping the deck face down.

Or did you mean that if they insert below the break you use the technique from ECT? I have ECT but have yet to read through it.
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Claudio

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremy Salow
Or did you mean that if they insert below the break you use the technique from ECT? I have ECT but have yet to read through it.


Yes I did, sorry for being unclear. If you have ECT, have a look at the Force section and read the force in question. You can see that by using the relevant handling according to where the Joker is inserted, you cover naturally both situations.
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