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Socrates

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Inner Circle
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Reply with quote  #1 
If you could create your own vision of coin magic, what effects, or tricks would you design?
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Rick Holcombe

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Reply with quote  #2 
I'm always trying to think of new ideas for coin magic. Most of the time I end up just inventing new ways to accomplish old ideas.

Some things that still roll around in my head:

1. Showing a coin at the fingertips, then with the other hand grasping at the edge of the coin to find a thread of silver.  As you pull the silver thread the coin begins to unravel until the left hand pulls away with a long silver thread. Where to go from there, I don't know.  I still haven't come up with the first part yet. LOL

2. Very cleanly showing a coin front and back laying in the palm. The coin is flipped in the air and is caught by the same hand and the coin has changed, then shown front and back.

3. Using silver "puff paint" or something similar to 3D print a coin.
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Socrates

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Some great ideas there Rick.

Number one sounds excellent, I like the idea of unravelling the threads of reality - I could see Neo doing something like this in the Matrix, it would definitely fit his style.
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Rick Holcombe

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Reply with quote  #4 
With coin tricks I tend to lean towards the more mysterious things; or visually jarring.

I think of coin magic as more in the realm of manipulation/sleight of hand than cards. While there are plenty of examples of knuckle busting card maneuvers, I find card magic easier to create something meaningful where you don't even appear to be doing sleight of hand. Card magic also more easily lends itself to the "storytelling" type of style.

With coins, I've been able to come up with some decent scripts for a few things, but you could literally perform most all coin magic in silence.

Rick
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Rick Holcombe

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I just realized you edited your post so thos may not make sense for other people
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Socrates

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Coin tricks are more suited to the eyes, visually jumping from place to place seems to be the norm... one of the things I find strange is the odd hand washing procedures some magicians use - not at all natural.

Ideas which are more offbeat strike a chord with me.  Vanishing coins can be done well, but I prefer the concepts like melting/stretching a coin, tearing them in half, or maybe even poking your finger through them.
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Rick Holcombe

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You might like this idea I had. Still working on it though



And I got another where the coins are suspended invisibly in a beam of light.
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Socrates

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Very cool, thanks for sharing.
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Magic-Aly

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Socrates
If you could create your own vision of coin magic, what effects, or tricks would you design?


Thought-provoking question, Socrates.

I would borrow whatever coins the spectator has in his or her pocket or purse.  I would talk about how our thoughts have a powerful energy all their own. That, like other powerful forces in the Universe, such as the wind, electricity or magnetism, our thoughts themselves cannot be seen, but like those other powerful forces of Nature, the manifestation of our thoughts, will be experienced in a very real and tangible way in our lives. 

I might say that our thoughts consist of creative energy and we can use them to draw desirable results to us such as love, good health, peace of mind, even money - - if we have the true belief, the faith that we can do so. I would ask he or she to join me in a little experiment to test the creative power of their thoughts.  I would clearly show the change they gave me and ask them how much is there.  My hands would be apparently empty, without saying so or trying to prove it. If I had sleeves, they would be rolled up.

I would then ask them to imagine - to visualize - that they are attracting greater financial resources into to their life.  Their change would then be placed or tossed into their hand and would immediately multiply to twice or three times as much. I would tell them to "keep the change" - "as a gift to yourself..."




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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #10 
That's a superb response Magic-Aly.

Reading over it reminded me of a piece of magic I like to do when I'm feeling generous. It is not a coin effect but it does involve money... I call it the bill-switch with a charitable twist.

I borrow a low denomination bill, and transform it into something much higher, here in the UK I'll take a £5 and change it to a £50. The person will remember this moment of magic forever, because I leave them with the £50. 

I have done this in all kinds of environments and it's a winner [wink]
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arthur stead

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Unfortunately I can’t add anything original here.  But I will always remember Bob Fitch blowing me away with unbelievable, seemingly impromptu coin magic in a corner at Tannen’s Magic Store.  As far as I can recall, most of what he did was standard coin stuff.  But it certainly didn’t appear to be that way in his hands.  The miracles just kept on happening!


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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Socrates
That's a superb response Magic-Aly.

Reading over it reminded me of a piece of magic I like to do when I'm feeling generous. It is not a coin effect but it does involve money... I call it the bill-switch with a charitable twist.

I borrow a low denomination bill, and transform it into something much higher, here in the UK I'll take a £5 and change it to a £50. The person will remember this moment of magic forever, because I leave them with the £50. 

I have done this in all kinds of environments and it's a winner [wink]


Thank you kindly, Socrates, for taking the time to give me that feedback and to share it here! I am sure that the people for whom you have done the transformation you mentioned will indeed remember that moment forever - long after they have forgotten tricks that others may have done for them.  You are very generous and you obviously prize giving the spectator a beautiful and memorable moment above exhibiting your own skill, which I am sure is formidable. Magicians like you greatly elevate our art.

Something I have been thinking about a lot in the last couple years is the idea of giving the spectator something that transcends simply a moment of showing how clever or skillful I am - something more than the implied, "Look how I was able to fool or baffle you.". I mean, they may be able to appreciate an exhibition of skill as far as that goes, but what's really in it for them?  I want it to be a two-way street where they walk away enriched in some way - whether it be inspirational or as we are discussing, monetarily. Somehow money effects where the magician turns their dollar into $20 or $100 or whatever, and the best the spectator gets is having been a conduit for the magician's aggrandizement, and/or merely gets back his original money, leaves me flat.

Many magicians are about their ego primarily and just use the spectators. It is no wonder many people do not like magic, or what has been held out to them as being "magic." Many people do not like being fooled. Perhaps they let their ego get the best of them -but that is the reality. So, I feel magic should be presented in a way that softens the "fooling" aspect and elevates the spectators. I find that stories are often a great way to go to blunt the effect and their pre-conceived notion (often justified by their experience) that as a magician, you are there to fool them...

As an example, when I do the Mismade Bill using, of course, their borrowed dollar, I always give them the mismade bill as a gift, and return their dollar to them as well.  Then there is a memorable take-away for them, and they have something very unusual that will allow the magic to play on in their minds and a nice conversation piece to share with others. In that manner, a true quid pro quo emerges from the encounter...

Not only that, they are likely to hire you in the future.  It's a win-win.
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Gerald Deutsch

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Reply with quote  #13 
I do a Perverse Magic coin effect for a "one trick" performance.

I borrow a dime and give it to a spectator to hold.

I tell him I will change is dime to a quarter and snap my fingers over his closed hand.

When he opens his hand it's not a quarter -- it's a penny!

I'm confused.

I reach into my pocket and remove change and give the spectator a dime.
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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic-Aly
As an example, when I do the Mismade Bill using, of course, their borrowed dollar, I always give them the mismade bill as a gift, and return their dollar to them as well.  Then there is a memorable take-away for them, and they have something very unusual that will allow the magic to play on in their minds and a nice conversation piece to share with others.



I'm probably in the minority here, but I disagree with this thinking and never give away a gimmick. It would be OK if they didn't show it to anyone, but when they do, a problem arises.

Any magical item (gimmick) that's given to a spectator, is only a magical item TO THE SPECTATOR WHO SAW THE TRICK. Without actually SEEING the magical process, that magical item will be seen for what it is - telling the story is not enough.

I believe the uncut sheets are fairly well known in the states. Someone who didn't see the actual transformation will see a bill that's been cut wrong - no amount of story telling will convince them otherwise.

Take the popular "Anniversary Waltz" as another example. Anyone who didn't see the trick will simply see a specially printed "trick" card.

Try showing someone a specially cut note (bill), or a double faced card (without doing a trick) and tell them someone created it by magic.


Jim

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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #15 
Jim, I appreciate your opinion - just not sure I would classify the Mismade Bill as a "gimmick."
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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #16 
PS Just to clarify the comment I made earlier in the thread about the Mismade Bill.  While I give them the Mismade Bill to keep, as I mentioned, I do not actually return "their dollar" to them. That would, of course, destroy the illusion that their dollar was changed into the Mismade Bill. I actually use a great gag that I learned from a Paul Gertner Video many years ago - I believe it was on a volume of Steel and Silver. You get a stack of brand new one dollar bills and make them into kind of a pad using rubber cement to bind them together along one of the long edges. You pull out this money pad, and rip off a bill, much the way you would rip a piece of paper off a pad of paper, give it to them. As I hand it to them I say, "Here take this, I just printed it today..."
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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic-Aly
Jim, I appreciate your opinion - just not sure I would classify the Mismade Bill as a "gimmick."


What we call it amongst ourselves has no bearing on how it will be seen.

Jim

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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jim ferguson
What we call it amongst ourselves has no bearing on how it will be seen. Jim


That is undoubtedly true.  I guess I just have a different view as to how it will be seen. Not a better one; just a different one.
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Gerald Deutsch

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Reply with quote  #19 

Two Dollar Bill

 

I thought this thread was about coins but since we’re also including bills, here’s an effect I posted on the Perverse Magic thread of the Genii forum on June 1, 2017:

 

Effect

 

The magician borrows two singles and crumpling them into balls, takes one ball in his right hand and the other in his left. He says he will make them stick together and he slaps them together but only one bill falls to the table. Confused, he opens the bill and finds – a two dollar bill. Confused, he puts the bill in his wallet and finds – two wrinkled singles – which he gives back to the lender.

 

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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic-Aly


That is undoubtedly true.  I guess I just have a different view as to how it will be seen. Not a better one; just a different one.


Indeed. And that is really how it should be. Magic would be very boring if we all had the same point of view and did everything the same way.
Most magicians do give these types of objects away, and that is completely fine - its just not for me. I am aware though that I'm probably in the minority.


Jim

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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #21 
Bending coins, altering minds - paper money was used to illustrate an idea I sometimes use.

Magic-Aly's idea and script is wonderful, we are blessed to read his words.

Many thanks for sharing.
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic-Aly


...

Many magicians are about their ego primarily and just use the spectators. It is no wonder many people do not like magic, or what has been held out to them as being "magic."

...


It is because of this that I completely stopped using the word "spectators" a long time ago, and switched to always using the word "volunteers" to describe audience participants.  Those who pick cards, hold coins, gaze at words on pages, etc are unpaid cast-members in our performances.  They donate their time to us at the risk of embarrassment or worse.  They deserve to be treated with respect and consideration, like any volunteer.

I think David Copperfield tells a story in one of his interviews of attending a magic performance he had seen many times.  The performer included an effect in which a woman from the audience was induced to chew up some paper, while the magician did the same thing.  The magician's paper magically restored to a mouth-coil, while his unfortunate audience participant was left picking bits of soggy paper out of her mouth on stage.  On this particular night, Copperfield had an epiphany.  The reason?  His mother was sitting beside him and he suddenly realized how he would feel if she had been the woman on stage.  It wasn't a good feeling.
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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #23 
Well said, Robin.
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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #24 
I found a dollar bill that was ripped in  half on a store floor one night and developed a routine. I hold up a silver dollar and say it will change into a half dollar and toss it into the hand. The bill appears and, oops, it's a dollar, but when it's unfolded it really is a "half dollar." Then it changes to a ten thousand dollar hell banknote.

By the way, the silver dollar completely vanishes. The motivation for the silver dollar going into the other hand is i just pretend i dropped it. 
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MagicTK

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Reply with quote  #25 
I've done a muscle pass "anit-gravity coin" routine where I place the a Kennedy dollar on the lower hand, and tell them I tie an invisible frog hair on the coin and around a finger on the hand above and it causes the coin to jump up.  After a couple of times, I say, I'm just kidding, it's a rubber coin (then flex it back and forth), but then I drop it on the table, and it's solid.  However, it's not flat...  it's bent.  Then I pick it up again and add a little heat to it with my fingers, then slap it down on the table and push seemingly kinda hard, and when I lift my hand, it's flat.

Not sure if it's 100% original, but I came up with it about 18 years ago at Abbott's, and I never read it anywhere.  I've even picked up the flat coin and shown it as rubber a second time, then set it down and it rocks back and forth because it's bent again.



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