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JenniferG

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Reply with quote  #51 

How did he get that 4 of hearts to his left hand.. what the heck.. just watched the Glenn Morphew intro.  I could clearly see the 4 of hearts card through his fingers in his right hand.. then all of a sudden it was gone and in his left hand where he pulls it out of pocket.  Incredible.

 

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JenniferG

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Reply with quote  #52 
He does it again at 2:55 in the video.  I gotta learn this 😉
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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #53 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ


When folks use a mirror I think they end up playing to the mirror.  I'm not sure that equates to how they operate when they perform for real.  I've always figured the best way to see how your magic looks is when it is done live, for a live audience and seen through their eyes.  A camera is the next best thing to their eyes.


And folks don’t end up playing to a camera?

The main danger is always blinking at the crucial moment. The blink hides the dirty work, therefore the move can’t be seen. Therefore the mirrorman or woman thinks the move is working.

I’ve never had that bother.

My mention of “the mirror” was a generalisation. I don’t use a mirror nowadays and haven’t done for years. When I did it was for initial perspective only.

I did use a mirror when I was a short-trousered-know-nothing schoolboy, because all the books recommended it. But I didn’t stay with it very long. I didn’t need it and now that I’m a know-nothing adult, I don’t need a camera. When I say “adult,” I mean officially, legally and all that whatnot.
Once I have an idea of the move and what I’m going to do with it, my practise become rehearsal.

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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #54 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevlingo
Using a mirror for practice prevents you from moving in a natural way, IMO. 


And yet here I am. Shuffling along with the rest of 'em.

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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #55 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevlingo

It's unlikely that if you perform in front of people that you will (or even should) keep such narrow window with your hands. It is also impossible to view the most import part of the sleight; your gaze, body language, spoken word, etc. To me, these are the most critical elements of making the "dirty work" invisible.



True enough. But that also applies to the camera.

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JenniferG

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Reply with quote  #56 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ

By the way, you commented the other day about a card change that Bill Malone did on a video.  Since you have Card Control, check out page 76!


Oh you are referring to that one sleight Bill Malone did at 1:10 mins into the following video right?  That was incredible.. blown away how he did that.  Thanks for telling me where to look! 😉



Bill Malone does such an incredible job with that doesn't he? Can't see a thing!  Is this hard to master?
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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #57 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevlingo

You can perform a "perfect pass" by openly cutting the cards if are good at managing the attention of your spectators.


Indeed. And I do.

In walkaround-table-top-hopping you can palm an elephant and no one will notice.
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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #58 

I don’t have issues palming with my right hand, because I’m right-handed. With (for example) card to wallet, I use a bottom palm.

I don’t use the top palm much, because to do so I have to transfer the pack from my right-hand dealing grip to my left-hand “palming grip” in order to palm the card with my right hand.

I worked out a strategy/procedure/method/whatever to do this years ago and it works. Looked at in isolation there’s movement (the hand-to-hand transfer) for no reason, other than to facilitate the move.

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #59 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Smithee

I don’t have issues palming with my right hand, because I’m right-handed. With (for example) card to wallet, I use a bottom palm.

I don’t use the top palm much, because to do so I have to transfer the pack from my right-hand dealing grip to my left-hand “palming grip” in order to palm the card with my right hand.

I worked out a strategy/procedure/method/whatever to do this years ago and it works. Looked at in isolation there’s movement (the hand-to-hand transfer) for no reason, other than to facilitate the move.



Eddie Fechter's top palm has always been a favorite.  It is unassuming and helps to keep the card from "leaking".  He does it as he taps the cards on the table to "square them".
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #60 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JenniferG


Oh you are referring to that one sleight Bill Malone did at 1:10 mins into the following video right?  That was incredible.. blown away how he did that.  Thanks for telling me where to look! 😉



Bill Malone does such an incredible job with that doesn't he? Can't see a thing!  Is this hard to master?


Yes, that's the one.  Study how he gets into the change and how he gets out of it.  It is close to perfection.  The actual mechanics aren't tough, putting it together is the challenge.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #61 
I've always associated the change Bill does with Eddie Fechter. He uses it in "I've Got A Surprise for You" but mentions that it's an "old thing." So it's not an Eddie Fechter creation. Does anyone know where that "Toss Change" originates from?

BTW The change is taught in the Fechter routine (I've Got a Surprise for You)

M
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chris w

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Reply with quote  #62 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
I've always associated the change Bill does with Eddie Fechter. He uses it in "I've Got A Surprise for You" but mentions that it's an "old thing." So it's not an Eddie Fechter creation. Does anyone know where that "Toss Change" originates from?


Sounds like maybe Buckley or Witcher or...?

https://conjuringcredits.com/doku.php?id=cards:throw_change
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #63 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
I've always associated the change Bill does with Eddie Fechter. He uses it in "I've Got A Surprise for You" but mentions that it's an "old thing." So it's not an Eddie Fechter creation. Does anyone know where that "Toss Change" originates from?

BTW The change is taught in the Fechter routine (I've Got a Surprise for You)

M


Buckley's description is on pg. 76 of Card Control. He claimed he developed it independently and used it as far back as 1910.
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TheAmazingStanley

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Reply with quote  #64 
The wide open bottom dealing bothers me even more. Laypeople may or may not know about double lifts, but everybody knows when a card comes out from the bottom something’s up.

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TheAmazingStanley

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Reply with quote  #65 
I always ask, is a get ready really necessary? You can do a strike double on four cards. Why all the fuss setting up a break? Different strokes I know, but this is exactly why I spend hours refining the strike instead of learning ten new ways to get a break. The get readies are harder than just turning two over. Maybe it’s really necessary for this trick though.
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JenniferG

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Reply with quote  #66 
Is the Marlo Hit the same as the Strike Double Lift?
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #67 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheAmazingStanley
I always ask, is a get ready really necessary? You can do a strike double on four cards. Why all the fuss setting up a break? Different strokes I know, but this is exactly why I spend hours refining the strike instead of learning ten new ways to get a break. The get readies are harder than just turning two over. Maybe it’s really necessary for this trick though.


If you are talking about the Brother John Hamman trick, then no, get-readies are not necessary.  That is explained in several of the posts.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #68 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JenniferG
Is the Marlo Hit the same as the Strike Double Lift?


As you can see by the list compiled on conjuringarchive.com there is a lot of hitting going on:

https://www.conjuringarchive.com/list/search?keyword=hit+double

The list is not 100% complete as Derek Dingle's style of "hit" or "strike" Double Turnover was detailed in 'The Complete Works of Derek Dingle'.  His is unique in that the finger contacting the side of the deck is actually the 3rd finger of the RH.

Everyone has their own style and some prefer to contact the card(s) in specific locations as that enables them to then proceed with the lift or turnover in a manner natural to them.
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TheAmazingStanley

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Reply with quote  #69 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ


If you are talking about the Brother John Hamman trick, then no, get-readies are not necessary.  That is explained in several of the posts.


I meant the Gertner trick in the original post. That was sort of a rhetorical question, but sort of not, because I was just wondering if those particular turnovers he does require doing it that way, in which case the “just turn them over” approach would be too simplistic. Maybe that was the point of comparing the Hamman trick. It’s early and I’m still waking up 😌

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #70 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheAmazingStanley


I meant the Gertner trick in the original post. That was sort of a rhetorical question, but sort of not, because I was just wondering if those particular turnovers he does require doing it that way, in which case the “just turn them over” approach would be too simplistic. Maybe that was the point of comparing the Hamman trick. It’s early and I’m still waking up 😌


That was Paul Gertner performing a Brother John Hamman trick.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #71 
Maybe it wasn't clear. In the Hamman trick the first double card is the center two cards of a four card packet. The second double is the bottom two cards of a three card packet.

M
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