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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Reply with quote  #1 
 I've seen some great effects done with stacked decks and gaffe(d) cards, e.g. John Guastaferro has one on Reel Magic called "Vino Aces", it has a great effect but it requires gaffed cards that can't be use for any other trick, or maybe another trick that requires a similar setup, but it is unusable for any trick that requires a normal deck.

How do you transition to another type of trick with cards? To me, these types of tricks seem to be one-offs, done in isolation.

I do have one card trick, my opener, that has stacked deck and an extra card. I've learned how to clean it up and the rest of my tricks that follow it are done by sleights with a now normal deck, but I would not how to transition into the that same trick without switching to a new deck.




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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamtheNotsoMagnificent
 I've seen some great effects done with stacked decks and gaffe(d) cards, e.g. John Guastaferro has one on Reel Magic called "Vino Aces", it has a great effect but it requires gaffed cards that can't be use for any other trick, or maybe another trick that requires a similar setup, but it is unusable for any trick that requires a normal deck.

How do you transition to another type of trick with cards? To me, these types of tricks seem to be one-offs, done in isolation.

I do have one card trick, my opener, that has stacked deck and an extra card. I've learned how to clean it up and the rest of my tricks that follow it are done by sleights with a now normal deck, but I would not how to transition into the that same trick without switching to a new deck.





I'm sure everyone has a different method on handling this situation, but here's what I do.

If I'm doing MacDonald's Aces or a version of it, I have a deck set up with the three gaffs and the AS dispersed in the deck and the three "fair" aces on top.

I spread through the deck, locate each ace and outjog them, face-up and then strip them off and lay them on the table.  This is standard procedure.  The idea is they accept them all as normal cards.  When you do the strip, you square them and flash the back of the AS as a subtle convincer.  You don't point it out, just let them notice.

After the trick, depending upon which version you do, the deck can be quite dirty.  In that case, I sometimes just gather all of the cards up and go onto a non-card effect.  If I choose to go back to cards, I simply pull out another deck.

The gaffs could also be gathered together and palmed off.  I would use a gambler's cop if I did this.

The question of where to do the effect in your set is a good one.  It is a pretty strong effect and takes a bit of time so it really doesn't fit my definition of an opener.  So if I put this into the set, I may do what I described but in reverse, beginning with a straight deck and then switching it later, after a coin routine or something.  Helps if you are wearing a jacket of course, or are sitting down with access to a briefcase or something.
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #3 
Vino Aces is JG's rendition of McDonald's Aces - I agree it is a great routine.

[Edit - here I basically repeat RayJ's advice, which he posted while I was still typing!]

The problem of ringing in one or more gaffed cards (and getting rid of them) haunts us all.  I think it boils down to planning and choreography.  Sometimes it is possible to keep the gaff(s) on the bottom of the deck during the first part of your set.  Some performers will use a holdout of some sort to gain easy access to gaffs and then palm them into the deck as needed.  Another popular ploy is to leave them in the card box.  During an earlier routine you find a reason to return the deck to the box, and the gaffs are in.  Pocketing the deck while you do something with coins (or whatever) is another solution.  The deck that comes out for the next card trick need not be the same deck that went in. 

[Edit - but here's a different thought]

Another approach is to just be up-front about using multiple decks of cards.  I remember a very well-known magician who would sit down, put three decks on the table, then do a trick with each one.  No explanations, no excuses.
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Harry Lorayne

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   I've used only borrowed - other peoples' - decks for the last few decades. 
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne

   I've used only borrowed - other peoples' - decks for the last few decades. 


That's what I found really helpful in "The Magic Book" you wrote. You don't need special cards or gaffes to do the tricks. Something about starting clean and ending clean appeals to me.

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamtheNotsoMagnificent


That's what I found really helpful in "The Magic Book" you wrote. You don't need special cards or gaffes to do the tricks. Something about starting clean and ending clean appeals to me.


Remember that double facers can be added to borrowed decks!  Especially if they match the standard USPCC face design, which many do.

Because they have no back, it doesn't matter that they don't come from the same pattern.

Ringing in a gaff into someone else's deck can be devastating.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #7 
I think a great way to start a McD Aces routine is to produce the aces in a flashy way. Check out Ricky Jay's version in the 52 Assistants show. I believe he produces the queens (instead of aces) via a Forton Pop Out move. They come out face up. I forget the details of how he then gets into the routine. I'll have to revisit the show.

Jon Racherbaumer has the best handling I know of for getting into the routine once the gaffs and regular aces are sequestered in a packet of 16 cards. It seems that you see the faces of all twelve X cards that are added to the aces. It's in a routine called "Olram Aces." I think it's available on his site. It's also in one of the Marlo Magazines.

My routine "Impossible Travelers" uses the McD gaffs in a different way. It's sort of "Open Travelers" meets "McDonald's Ace" and can be found in Top Secret Stuff.

Vino Aces is pretty much for use in a formal show. You can't walk around with four wine glasses! Because of that I think it will be easier to switch decks or add the gaffs in secretly. 

Gary Kurtz has some ideas for McD too. I think he has the spectator put the Ace of spades group into his coat pocket. There's no hint that the aces that are disappearing are going to end up in the guy's pocket. They're just disappearing. So finding them there is a big surprise. I think you don't want the specs to see the ending coming. They should just be wondering where the aces are going.

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #8 
From Mike P.'s post above..."I think you don't want the specs to see the ending coming."


Sometimes it is unavoidable, but yes, when the spectators understand what the end game is, it can diminish the impact.  That's one reason some like to do a "backfire assembly" where instead of the 4th ace being revealed in the leader packet, suddenly all of the aces return to their beginning locations.  Or in this instance, MacDonald's Aces, when it is time to reveal the last ace, it turns out they are actually kings or blank or mirrors, or whatever.
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Magic Harry

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Reply with quote  #9 
Buck Clayton a member of our old magic club who is no longer with us, did a rising card routine using a Devano rising card deck that I liked.
He would start with a matching regular deck and have 3 cards chosen. With the spectators still holding their cards he would put the regular deck away. Then very seriously he would say he has a prediction. "there are only 49 cards left in the deck" after the laugh he would bring out the gaffed deck and proceed with the rising card routine.
A subtlety he used was to have the bottom face cards of each deck match each other.
I hope you like it and can use this idea in switching in your gaffed decks.

While on the subject of gaffed cards I use this line when I do a packet trick using gaffed cards.
" Sometimes audiences get confused while watching a card trick because there are so many cards to keep track of in a full deck, so I would like to make it easier for you by using only a few cards for you to follow."
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Magic Harry

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic Harry
Buck Clayton a member of our old magic club who is no longer with us, did a rising card routine using a Devano rising card deck that I liked.
He would start with a matching regular deck and have 3 cards chosen. With the spectators still holding their cards he would put the regular deck away. Then very seriously he would say he has a prediction. "there are only 49 cards left in the deck" after the laugh he would bring out the gaffed deck and proceed with the rising card routine.
A subtlety he used was to have the bottom face cards of each deck match each other.
I hope you like it and can use this idea in switching in your gaffed decks.

While on the subject of gaffed cards I use this line when I do a packet trick using gaffed cards.
" Sometimes audiences get confused while watching a card trick because there are so many cards to keep track of in a full deck, so I would like to make it easier for you by using only a few cards for you to follow."
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Magic Harry


Good examples Harry.  Since you are a new member, please take the time to introduce yourself in a separate thread.

We're glad you found TMF!
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lopabrc

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ


Remember that double facers can be added to borrowed decks!  Especially if they match the standard USPCC face design, which many do.

Because they have no back, it doesn't matter that they don't come from the same pattern.

Ringing in a gaff into someone else's deck can be devastating.


I think this is a great observation!. On certain venues you could even ask the event planner to provide you with a new deck of cards, of a brand that will match your own gaffed cards. This way you can reinforce the idea of not using your own cards, and still been able to use your gaffs.
Just my two cents,
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #12 
One of the funniest gags I've ever seen at a magic convention was when a magician borrowed a deck and said to the lender "Ok, think of any card."  He picked the top card off the deck and held it face down.  "Name your card".  "8 of Clubs" said the owner of the deck.  The magician turned over the card he was holding ... it was the 4 of Diamonds.  "Gosh darn," he said, "this trick never works!" and he tore the card in pieces and threw them on the floor!  The poor deck owner was left with his jaw hanging.

The gag: the 4D was from the borrower's own deck - he palmed it onto the borrowed deck at the start of the trick. 
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