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superdayv

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Reply with quote  #1 
I'm learning the Top Palm I in RRTCM. 

It suggests that after you move the top card up with your thumb, it's your right pinky that first makes contact with it and levers it into your palm. But, in the Paul Wilson DVDs he suggests first using your right ring finger to tilt the card up, and then making contact with your pinky.

Are there advantages/disadvantages to either approach?

PS This is my first post, and I'm very sorry if this kind of question isn't allowed!

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by superdayv
I'm learning the Top Palm I in RRTCM. 

It suggests that after you move the top card up with your thumb, it's your right pinky that first makes contact with it and levers it into your palm. But, in the Paul Wilson DVDs he suggests first using your right ring finger to tilt the card up, and then making contact with your pinky.

Are there advantages/disadvantages to either approach?

PS This is my first post, and I'm very sorry if this kind of question isn't allowed!



I think it depends on how you first learned it.  I use my pinky.  Always have, always will.
But if I learned it today, I might go for the ring finger.  I've tried, and I can see how it would be good, but it doesn't "feel right" to me.  Old habits die hard.

The main thing is to make sure the card levers into the palm properly and you don't "overshoot" and allow the card to leak out on the pinky side.  That comes with practice.

With practice, you will find that very little movement of the thumb is necessary.  The card barely has to extend off of the side.  In fact, it can be done with one hand, no brief required, but I'll admit it is more difficult.

Hope that helps some.  Of course the success of any move like that depends upon timing and misdirection.  Do it at the right time!


Edit:  Equally important is what comes next.  In other words, now that you have palmed the card, what are you going to do with that hand?  If standing, dropping it to you side like a dead fish is the typical way to go.  Study what your arm would do normally when you square the pack and then relax.  If surrounded, watch your angles.  Keep the hand close to your thigh.  Or if necessary, reach across and grab your other arm in a loose, casual way.  
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superdayv

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you so much for the helpful reply! 

I actually find the pinky easier, but I'm going to keep playing around with both. You mentioned that you see the advantages of the middle finger. I'm curious what those are? Maybe understanding that will help me decide.

I'm having a hard time keeping my right thumb down; it wants to shoot out to 90*. Is that normal?

Thanks again.
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GregB

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Reply with quote  #4 
So I didn't learn the top palm from a book or video, I learned that it was a move and tried on my own to figure out how to do it, so I actually only use my pinky. I grip the deck with my left hand and bring my right hand over the top, then I put my right pinky on the top right edge of the card and just push forward and over the front edge with my pinky. This causes the card to pop up and rotate just enough into my palm position.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by superdayv
Thank you so much for the helpful reply! 

I actually find the pinky easier, but I'm going to keep playing around with both. You mentioned that you see the advantages of the middle finger. I'm curious what those are? Maybe understanding that will help me decide.

I'm having a hard time keeping my right thumb down; it wants to shoot out to 90*. Is that normal?

Thanks again.


Is the right thumb shooting out? Focus is the only way I know to control that.

The reason I think the ring finger makes sense is it might help some keep the card square. Also, since it is longer than the pinky, it might make the move easier for some.
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superdayv

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ

The reason I think the ring finger makes sense is it might help some keep the card square. Also, since it is longer than the pinky, it might make the move easier for some.


Gotcha, makes sense!

Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ


Is the right thumb shooting out? Focus is the only way I know to control that.


I'll keep working on it!

Thanks again for the advice.
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Zero

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Reply with quote  #7 

Different top palms do different things for different reasons. 

I personally recommend starting out with the Bergs top palm found in Card Control by Arthur Buckley or by learning it from Jason England in his fundamentals video. this palm is mechanical and simple, allowing you to do more than one card to palm with no effort at all.

For the more advanced and those wanting help with their thumbs and motivations I highly recommend "Notes Concerning the Palming of Cards - John Galsworthy"
the first issue of which deals with the top palm in its completeness (the principles of which are applicable to any palms, not just his) - this has changed my palming and taken it from average to something I love doing all the time. Absolutely top-notch teaching and writing in there. 

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Jack Deschain

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Reply with quote  #8 
I personally love Glenn Morphew's One handed top palm. It takes a while to learn but once it "clicks" you have a rock solid top palm that is very disarming. Glenn is a great teacher as well. He goes over tons of fine points, troubleshooting, pocket loads, and other goodies.
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