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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi folks.

There is an old subtlety in which an indifferent, but similar card to a selection, is placed into the deck while the fingers cover the index - so that it may pass as the selection. If you are unfamiliar with this ruse, check out the Ambitious Card part one in Royal Road, for an explanation.

In my Ambitious Card routine I combine this ruse with the popular Ellis Riser Move, in the following way -

To follow along with this description, grab your cards, and place the five of clubs on top and the four of clubs on the bottom. The five is the selection, or "ambitious" card.

Turn the five face up for display, then turn face down. Go into the Riser Move. As the selection is outjogged, the four of clubs from the bottom is secretly added (as per the usual procedure). The right hands half of the deck is fanned, and the selection is apparently placed in the centre of the fan, again outjogged.
The left thumb riffles the left corner of it's half, stopping at about the centre, and pulls down, forming an opening. The right hand places the fan into the opening, the fan automatically closing. At this point you have the deck in left hand, with the selection apparently sticking out the back (really the four instead of the five).

Now, if you now turn your hand over, back up, so that what was the right long edge of the deck, is now straight on to the spectators, it apparently gives a clear view of the selection sticking out from the centre of the deck. The heel of the hand naturally obscures the index, giving quite a convincing illusion.

The hand is returned to it's original position, and the "selection" pushed flush. A riffle/snap or whatever, and it's back on top.

If anyone uses a blank card as the ambitious one, any ace apart from spades can be used - it looks just like a blank card.

If anything is unclear in my description, please don't hesitate to ask, and I will be happy to clarify.

Thank you for reading.


Jim

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #2 
This type of subtlety can be an added convincer that elevates a move from good to great. This works with courts too so long as you cover the pips. Comes in handy for certain sandwich effects. Good post!
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #3 
A pseudo duplicate can really be a useful tool. 

M
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #4 
Great handling Jim - I like the natural cover given by the heel of the hand much better than the old method of grabbing the index corner of the exposed card with finger and thumb.
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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thank you Ray, Mike, and Robin for your replies.

Court cards are excellent for this ruse, as Ray pointed out. The only cards which aren't suitable as the actual selection are the aces, eights, nines, and tens. These cards CAN be used (except the aces), but you must be careful either with the orientation of the "decoy", or the amount that is exposed during the move.

To give my above post, and the move a bit of context, here's how I get into it -

I set the deck during a previous trick in which I have to look through the deck - Dr Daleys Last Trick for example.
I cut the first suitable card I come to, to second from the bottom (this will be the duplicate). I then cull what will be the selection, to fourth position from the top. This is done while removing the aces or whatever.
After Daleys, the aces are returned and the deck shuffled - I use a variation of the Erdnase shuffle here, which moves the main card to fifth position, and the "decoy" to the bottom.

I then spread the cards asking for one to be touched, which is cleanly outjogged. The card is removed and placed face-up on top of the deck using a cull and Mike Close' wonderful Spread Double, to force the card that was in fifth position. It simply looks like a card has been selected and placed face up on the deck.

The double is flipped back over, and the top card cut into the centre. The front edge is riffled and the selection is back on top.
I now go into the Riser move with the decoy as explained above, for the second phase (I usually do three phases altogether, occasionally four).

Hope that makes sense.


Jim


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chris w

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks for sharing this, Jim. Good combination. Like Robin, I find using the heel of the hand to cover the index (as here) more natural than the usual approach of holding an outjogged card by the corner they most want to see.
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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thank you for your reply Chris.


Jim

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Ferry Gerats

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Reply with quote  #8 
Dear Jim, where can I find info about the Ellis Riser Move? Thanks in anticipation.
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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hi Ferry.

You know, I've been using the move for many years, but I'm not entirely sure where I learned it from.

Perhaps one of our other members will have a source ?

Sorry I can't be of more help.


Jim


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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #10 
Here's a number of publications where Super Rise or the loading move can be found...

https://www.conjuringarchive.com/list/search?keyword=Tom+Ellis
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #11 
The AH can be used as a pseudo-dupe for the AD by letting the pointy part of the heart pip peek out a bit as you hide the index corner with fingertips. That ruse might work in this context with the index being hidden by the heel of the left hand. You'd just see the tip of the heart peeking out as it's interpreted to be the diamond.

I looked up the Ellis move in Pallbearer's. It was published in 1974. But Wes James' "Coming Up In the World" was published in 1973 in Garcia's Super Subtle Card Miracles. The James move is essentially the same IMO. Wes addresses this issue in depth in Enchantments on p. 178 (Historical Note).

Mike
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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #12 
Ray and Mike, thank you very much for providing the information Ferry was looking for.

I've studied so many books over the years, and also hung around a magic shop during my teens. There are many tricks, sleights and little bits and bobs I've picked up through the years that I haven't a clue where I actually got them from.

I'm sure it's the same for many of us


Jim

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Mbreggar

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Reply with quote  #13 
All great ideas...
I have used the 7,8 and 9 of clubs as masks for each other.
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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #14 
Thanks Michael.


Jim

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbreggar
All great ideas...
I have used the 7,8 and 9 of clubs as masks for each other.


Many oil and water routines involve an extra card. When cards such as this are used, the audience generally will not notice if during the routine one of the cards goes missing while another one takes its place.

The key is to never declare the value of the cards, but rather only as black or red, or perhaps by suit, but the more broadly you describe them the better.
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Ferry Gerats

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Reply with quote  #16 
Ray thanks for the reference. Upon reading it I recognised the procedure. Up to now I've never known its name nor its inventor. Having read the historical note in Enchantments  (Thanks Mike) it would be fair to call it from now the Load-Up Move from Wesley James. Load-Up move is the name Wesley James gave it.
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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ


Many oil and water routines involve an extra card. When cards such as this are used, the audience generally will not notice if during the routine one of the cards goes missing while another one takes its place.

The key is to never declare the value of the cards, but rather only as black or red, or perhaps by suit, but the more broadly you describe them the better.



Years ago I had an oil and water routine that used six cards, three red and three black. It was my own creation, based on Rene Lavants classic, with a kicker ending. Two of the six cards were split - I used the cards from Dean Dill and Michael Webers "A New World" deck.

As I only had one set of the cards, when I did the oil and water routine there was one card of each colour that changed suit every time the cards separated - not once did anyone notice.

Like you said, get them to concentrate on the colour only.


Jim

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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferry Gerats
Ray thanks for the reference. Upon reading it I recognised the procedure. Up to now I've never known its name nor its inventor. Having read the historical note in Enchantments  (Thanks Mike) it would be fair to call it from now the Load-Up Move from Wesley James. Load-Up move is the name Wesley James gave it.



Thanks Ferry, that's quite interesting. As I mentioned above, I've been using the move for years, but I can't remember where I got it from. I didn't know what it was called either, but during a discussion with Euan Bingham a few years ago, he mentioned he thought it was called the Ellis Riser Move - I've called it that since.

Thank you for setting the record straight.


Jim

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