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prestigiazione.it

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Maybe I'm wrong, but I recall to have read, somewhere somehow, that Annemann was not so much prone to give the right crediting to his stuff, is it true or i'm just wrong?
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #2 
Is there a reason that you need/want to know?  Many magicians over the years have been guilty of not properly crediting.  If Annemann was guilty, he certainly wasn't alone.

Here are two introductions from his book on forcing.  He mentions crediting in both.

FIRST INTRODUCTION: I want to say right at the start that I am not claiming any originality for the contents of this manuscript. In a number of instances I think I have added some forces and methods that are my own, but it would be hard to prove because of the sameness in basic principles. In my professional work I found that many times I had need of a good force and on the spur of the moment it was hard if not impossible for me to think of the most suitable method for the conditions under which I was working. I know that this is a situation in which every worker has found himself, and because of that I know just how useful this compilation will be. It was over a year ago when Arthur Lloyd, the Human Card Index, whose name and act (the only one of its kind) has graced practically every vaudeville theatre in the world, spoke to me about the usefulness of a complete compilation on the subject of forcing. I immediately agreed, and for one year have picked up and filed every possible method that I could locate. I know well enough that the collection is not complete. No collection of anything pertaining to Magic is complete insofar as methods go. But I do know that this is the first time such a collection has been offered and therefore I have done my best to make it as representative as possible. If there are more than 101 methods between the covers of this work, don't thank me for being generous. You are getting everything that I have filed and without counting them I selected the title because it looks good on paper and sounds well. There are no less than 101 methods in all so I have not fallen below the mark, which to me is something. Introductions should be short and to the point. I fear that I have already said a little too much that is or will be of little interest to the reader who would rather delve into the secrets.

And this, the second introduction to the same book:

SECOND INTRODUCTION: I suppose that it is alright for the writer to attach two introductions by himself even though it may not be done as the usual thing. Nearly two years have passed since I laboriously turned out the original 101 manuscript, which, though a disgrace to make Gutenberg turn over in his grave, did pave the way to this more extensive and (thanks only to Max Holden) much better appearing product. That makes it about three years since Arthur Lloyd gave me the idea of compiling such a collection. Time does fly but after the first one hundred and fifty methods were together, time didn't mean a thing because there just seemed to be no more. The last fifty-two were the greatest struggle I've ever had and as far as I am concerned, the mention of the word "force" is now known to put me in a pretty dangerous frame of mind. I must thank Jean Hugard here for invaluable help inasmuch as he dug up about 25 of the later additions and it was a great help indeed. Otherwise I can't give any credit out, not just because it doesn't seem to be done anymore, but because such a thing is impossible and would start some sort of a riot, I am sure. A year from now I'll probably remember it all as a lot of fun. Right now I can only send it out with a prayer and thanksgiving that I have finished. November 28, 1933 Theo. Annemann.

Annemann was a pioneer and a giant in the field of mentalism, as well as magic in general.  His short, troubled life was over far too soon.
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Paco Nagata

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by prestigiazione.it
Maybe I'm wrong, but I recall to have read, somewhere somehow, that Annemann was not so much prone to give the right crediting to his stuff, is it true or i'm just wrong?

I've never heard about that.

As Ray has showed to us in a great post, Annemann was not used to crediting much to himself.

Nontheless I have heard about Annemann that he had "stage fright," so then the reason why he didn't perform much, but wrote a lot.
I wonder as well if that's true.

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #4 
Yes he did suffer from stage fright at times. He was an incredible performer by all accounts.

http://geniimagazine.com/wiki/index.php?title=Theodore_Annemann
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #5 
Video of his bullet catch.

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prestigiazione.it

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thank you!

Just because I recall an interview about Annemann, so I was wondering.

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Rick Franceschini

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Reply with quote  #7 
There is the famous story of Vernon and Dr. Daley being with Nate Leipzig at a function where Annemann performed one of Leipzig's tricks, maybe several.  Dr. Daley turned to Leipzig and asked him what he thought of Annemann doing this and Leipzig answered, "I think he does it very well."  The point of the story is to point out that Nate Leipzig was a gentleman and would never intentionally speak ill of others.  Perhaps that is the story you read?  
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #8 
I didn't want to post a link here but I stumbled on a "bio" of Annemann that had a negative comment about his lack of crediting. I felt it was over the top and there were also factual errors in it. When someone has passed in such a tragic way I think it best to just move on. He certainly cannot defend himself if he even felt the need to.
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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #9 
I don't think that because someone has died their body of work is beyond comment. If it's okay to praise someone then it's surely okay to look at what they're done. Witness Richard Kaufman and Ed Marlo. However there are limits and character assassination is simply bad news.

I have the "Jinx" and think it's a Classic. Annemann seems to have had a wide knowledge of Magic and it pours out of every page. If he was free and easy with credits, this is the first I've heard about it, although all that means is that it's the first I've heard about it.
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