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Intensely Magic

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Reply with quote  #1 
This was the quote at the front of Denis Behr's archive. I loved it!

If your audience does not notice the effect, do not mention it.

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Intensely Magic
This was the quote at the front of Denis Behr's archive. I loved it!

If your audience does not notice the effect, do not mention it.


Why? What does it mean to you?
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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #3 
Is there any context for the statement ? It seems an odd thing to say.
I'm also curious as to how the word "effect" is being used here.



Jim


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Paco Nagata

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Reply with quote  #4 
I think I got it (I think...):

If you make a coin desapear in front of some audience, and nobody say anything, it would be better you not to say "the coin has desapeared."

Why?

Let's analyse the situation:

If you say "the coin has desapeared" and someone reply, "Nop, the coin is inside your pocket!" because you have done the movement poorly, you can't run away from a ridiculous situation. However, if you don't say anything and someone say something like: "Hey, are you trying to make me believe that the coin has desapeared? It is in your pocket!" You may run away from the situation by saying something like: "I've never claimed that the coin has desapeared. Just wanted to know if you guys could notice that I put it into my pocket."

In short:

Don't claim any magic until you are sure that your audience have seen magic.

I may misunderstand the quote as well, what do you think? 



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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #5 
You may have got it right, Paco, but I'm with RayJ and Jim on this. 

It doesn't (gulp) resonate with me.
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Intensely Magic

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Reply with quote  #6 
This quote is attributed to Ernest Earick, I believe. His quotes rotate with every logon. It’s the best collection I’ve ever seen.

What immediately came to mind is the number of transpositions that go totally unnoticed until pointed out. I was watching a lecture this morning and the CSB routine was a jumbled mess and I’m sure no one would have seen the “magic” if it was not pointed out after the fact. I find that lame.

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Satan got you by the hand
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leading you on a merry dance
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #7 
Intensely Magic - I too immediately thought of a transposition routine as a potential type of trick where the effect might go unnoticed. It's easy to allow confusion to happen in such a routine. Transpositions require a lot of careful set-up so that the magic is apparent.

M
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arthur stead

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Reply with quote  #8 

I think I understand.

Sometimes mis-timing something can make a difference.  Or not making the audience aware enough of what is happening (or not happening).  Also, some audience members not that familiar with magic may be “slower” than others to understand something.

I find that performing at a slow, deliberate pace, and emphasizing every action clearly, leaves less of a chance for something to go “unnoticed” by the audience.


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Zero

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Reply with quote  #9 

If you've failed to have the effect reveal itself to the audience and you're standing there having to explain the effect then you're just telling them about the effect that they didn't get to experience (effectivley nothing happened in their mind), just ditch it and do the effect again later because you lose nothing because they didnt see anything, and you get a chance to make it clearer instead of killing it with some bad explaination which sacrifices their ability to have that surprise for the first time. 

 

Just dont mention it, move on and do something else, then you get to do the effect again later. better. 

“Explaining a joke is like dissecting a frog. You understand it better but the frog dies in the process.” ― E.B. White (not always true, but generally true and kinda relevant here.)

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