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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello,

The first sleight-of-hand technique I learned was the back palm.

I thought (and still do) it's amazing the way a card just vanishes before your eyes without any gimmicks.

However, it's been a few years and I'd really like to nail it.

Also, I love the back palm to front palm to back palm as a technique for making it appear that you don't have a card in your hand.

I'm kind of there with all this, but I'd like to watch a few instructional videos to see how the pros do it.  I'm happy to pay for the videos.

Any recommendations?

Thanks,

Buffalo
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chris w

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Reply with quote  #2 
Jeff McBride's Art of Card Manipulation set would be my starting place.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #3 
The back palm was my first sleight too! I learned it from "The Amateur Magician's Handbook." 

Second the motion for the Jeff McBride DVDs.

Mike
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buffalo McKinley
Hello,

The first sleight-of-hand technique I learned was the back palm.

I thought (and still do) it's amazing the way a card just vanishes before your eyes without any gimmicks.

However, it's been a few years and I'd really like to nail it.

Also, I love the back palm to front palm to back palm as a technique for making it appear that you don't have a card in your hand.

I'm kind of there with all this, but I'd like to watch a few instructional videos to see how the pros do it.  I'm happy to pay for the videos.

Any recommendations?

Thanks,

Buffalo


Are you just wanting to learn this for fun, to mess around with?  Or are you wanting to maybe learn to do card manipulations including card fan productions, etc?

Routined Manipulation by Lewis Ganson has some excellent instruction in card manipulation, how to prepare the cards, etc. and the books used to be very affordable.

I second the advice above on McBride for video instruction.  Really, if you can do a backpalm then reversing it to front palm and back isn't something you need instruction in, you can work it out.  You will likely need to enlist help from your thumb as you revolve the card from the back to the front.

I used to do a complete card manipulation routine as part of my standup act. It was challenging to work out the steals and such but a lot of fun to do.

For closeup performance, John Carney has a routine in Carneycopia that is outstanding.

Great book anyway!


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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks everyone for the recommendations!

Ray, I'm probably not going all in with the card manipulations.  I started learning back palm/front palm a few years ago, and when I start something it drives me crazy if I don't finish it.  I really just need some fine tuning.

I'm glad you mentioned the use of the thumb, because I've been using my thumb as part of back palm to front palm, and I wasn't sure if I was doing something wrong or unnecessary.

My biggest challenge is that when I go to back palm, either the corners of the card peek through my fingers OR if they don't, I have a tenuous grip on the card behind my hand.

Also, there's clearly some noise when back palming and front palming.

Thanks,

Buffalo
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #6 
It is almost impossible to eliminate all leaking and that is why card manipulations are best suited for the stage. Nowadays you can purchase flesh-colored cards which helps some. Trouble is, like TTs, they never seem to match your flesh. Still better than nothing. I used to use red backed decks for split fans as I preferred poker size. Maybe you can get manipulation cards in poker size now but back in the day, Norm Nielsen, etc. were all bridge sized. Red is closer to flesh than blue, so if not flesh, go red.

You can hide the top edge of the card or cards by extending your thumb out towards your fingertips. Now you only have the bottom to worry about.

I suggest you view Norm Nielsen, Lance Burton and McBride and study their techniques. Should be on youtube.
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Leo Kim

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Reply with quote  #7 


In the book "Howard Thurston´s card tricks" from 1903 he has a chapter about the continuous front and backpalm, and also a chapter about a mechanical device for the move. Sorry, no video but I thought it might be interesting as a bit of curiosa at least.

Micke Johansson
Sweden 



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