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JohnnyNewYork

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello everyone!  At Rudy's online sessions the topic of "favorite" or most convincing cuts always come up when it comes to card magic.  Everyone has a "go-to" cut, either on the table or in hands (Andru Luvisi has shared a couple of approaches to blind cuts that look great, for example).  I'd like to add a GENERAL and VERY SIMPLE idea that you might consider whenever appropriate for the routine - a Dani DaOrtiz/Lennart Green style handling, which can be applied to MANY false table cuts that you're already using (Gracie Morgan and others apply this type of approach to some degree with other sleights, such as  culling).  For example, with the well-known Ose Cut (explained in Lorayne's Close Up Card Magic) or Bannon's Dutch Cut (explained in his Mentalissimo), instead of cutting NEAT packets to the table, simply "toss" the cards to the table in a "messier", casual fashion.  I am finding that, to lay audiences, it makes the (seemingly) fairness of the "slightly sloppier" cut look even more convincing.  Naturally, this approach doesn't fit every effect, but it will definitely create a different look and feel.  I know there are many versions of the cuts mentioned above, but I thought the idea might be worth considering if you haven't used the approach before, and, of course, it doesn't take any extra work at all.  Hope some of you find it useful - johnny
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #2 
Johnny, you are so right about this.  I had the pleasure of seeing Simon Lovell in person at a Midwest Magic Jubilee.  In his live performances he has an almost "haphazard" style.  For example, on several occasions he would drop a card or cards while overhand shuffling, or accidentally reverse one, etc.  The point being, there was apparently no way he could have been controlling the cards because he couldn't even keep them in his hands.  Very disarming.

But there is a time and a place for everything.  I would not take this approach during a gambling demo, where you are otherwise using very precise shuffles and cuts.  But during a casual presentation of a magical effect, it can be a great advantage.
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Mbreggar

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Reply with quote  #3 
I ABSOLUTELY agree with Johnny on this. I'll take it a step further. My experience has shown me leaving little "steps" equal to the number of cuts (minus 1) made helps significantly too. For example, the Ose cut yields three piles. When I reassemble them, I allow the piles to be offset a little bit showing two (3-1) obvious steps. I let that sit there for a moment while I patter. This reinforces the idea that you just cut the deck into three separate sections. Similarly, a tabled optical false cut producing two piles, when reassembling the two piles, leave them slightly askew and showing the two pieces and one (2-1) step. 

By the way, I also discovered, for some reason giving the Ose cut a "name" during performance helps too. I frequently call it a "Vegas-style triple cut favored by most of the fancy casinos." For what it's worth, this adds "legitimacy" to a cut which is very different to the standard cut lay people execute when they play cards. 
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JohnnyNewYork

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Reply with quote  #4 
RayJ and Mike - I'm glad I'm not alone regarding the extra conviction of the "messier" approach with appropriate routines - thanks for your thoughts.  [By the way, Mike (and for the guys not familiar with your book "Launching Pad"), your approach to the OOTW theme is EXCELLENT and provides for a very entertaining presentation!  I use Lorayne's handling (in Close Up Card Magic) as well as your version and get great reactions with both of them (sorry for the shameless plugs here, but good magic is good magic, as they say).]   Anyway, I appreciate your thoughts - johnny
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #5 
I like to push a little harder than what Mike suggested above viz. calling the Ose the "Vegas-style triple cut..." I think that's a good idea since people would intuitively know that whatever they do in Vegas would be the best way to guarantee that there's no way back from the cut. I like to verbalize that by noting that a single cut can be undone by another single cut. But a triple cut cannot. Something like "This is how they cut in Vegas since unlike a single cut, a triple cut cannot be undone." In reality the cut that can't be undone is this: pull out the center section of the deck and put it on top. Then perform a straight cut. This really gets the intended job done. 

I'm still thinking on the "messiness" factor. I think that when you're cutting, it should appear haphazard. But I don't feel a need to have the packets spreading or disheveled. Cutting is inherently a "neat" process in general. 

For a cutting sequence that looks almost like the deck was shuffled, check out Johnny New York's "Steroid Cut" from the October 2018 Card Corner column in the Linking Ring. It's impossible to see that the deck is returned to original order. It needs a little table space, but it's well worth the small amount of practice that's needed to master it.

Mike
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Mbreggar

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Reply with quote  #6 
I love the description, Mike!

And thanks so much for the kind words, Johnny!
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Zero

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Reply with quote  #7 

I like a dishevelled cut, feels relaxed and open.

who in the world could care about the order of cards when you can't even be bothered keeping the things straight. 

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