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Robert McGee

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Reply with quote  #51 
An old but still good reference is the two pamphlets by Ed Marlo, i.e., "The Farp Shuffle" and "Faro Notes". Both are still available from Magic Inc. in Chicago and are contained in the combined Revolutionary Card Magic book. Ed teaches and recommends the bottom up version.

Harry Lorayne in Close up Card Magic teaches and recommends the top down method.

Depending on the condition of the deck one or the other usually works.

Mike Close's tutorial is also excellent.

Steve Reynolds has a good video tutorial on the table faro. Martin Nash has an old video that introduces the table faro and has some really good hints on using it before you can do perfect shuffles.

If you have access to back issues of MUM, Harry Riser's column had a series on tricks requiring only one faro shuffle.

And, of course Harry Lorayne's books contain some great routines using the faro, which really inspired me to learn the faro. Like he says, it's the good stuff.

If it is still there there is an exhaustive list over on The Magic Cafe of Faro Shuffle references.

Van
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luigimar

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Reply with quote  #52 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mats Kjellstrom
You can download a free ebook about the Faro Shuffle here:

http://www.lybrary.com/faromania-p-680843.html


Robert, I think this is the ebook you mean, it was already mentioned long time ago (post number 8 in this thread)

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Matt G

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Reply with quote  #53 
Thank you so much for posting this thread. It's actually what inspired me to finally register for an account here instead of lurking in the shadows, because I wanted to share my journey to perfection with some like-minded people. There have definitely been times where I want to give up -- why am I not getting any better? Why do I get it perfect sometimes, but not others? Seeing that everyone has gone through the same phase is really opening my eyes. πŸ˜‰

I haven't been practicing card magic for very long (only ~5 months or so), but I'm absolutely obsessed with it and the beauty of Faros has me absolutely hooked. Currently, I'm working on perfecting my Faros to be able to perform Paul Gertner's Unshuffled as well as a few other cool routines. Hopefully I can revisit this post in a couple months and be a confident Faro shuffler πŸ˜‰

I first learned how to do a "Faro" about a month ago, but decided to start working on using it as a card sleight and striving for perfection about a week ago. I also managed to slice my left index finger pretty bad over the weekend so that wasn't great, lol. My goal is to get 8 in under 2 minutes before the end of April -- for that, I need to become way more consistent. I never have more than two "doubles" in the deck, but they appear in random places -- sometimes at the very start (ie: bottom) of the weave, sometimes at the very end of the weave, and sometimes in the middle. So I feel like I'm getting there, but just missing one tiny little knack to get it consistently perfect.

Resources I've used to learn (and some quick comments):
Chris Ramsay's YouTube Tutorial ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=134LJpwU5lE [wink]: The first way I learned to Faro -- vertical packets. I find I have a bit less control vertically than horizontally, though. When first starting out, I think this is a good way to understand the basic mechanics of what the cards have to do.
TheVirts - Perfect Faro & Cascade ( https://shop.thevirts.com/products/perfect-faro ): I love cardistry and wanted to learn how to do the flourish smoothly at the end, and the cascade is really pretty. With that being said, Huron's method didn't quite work consistently for me. I tried for about 4 hours and didn't get a perfect Faro once, so I decided to go back to the drawing board. Might revisit this after I'm more confident with my weaving, as I think it's actually the smoothest performance I've seen of the Faro (least moving parts).
Michael Close - Learn the Faro Shuffle ( https://www.michaelclose.com/products/learn-the-faro-shuffle-download ): Awesome tips and tricks here, really helped with hand placement and prepping the deck. 
Paul Gertner - Unshuffling the Faro Shuffle ( https://www.penguinmagic.com/p/4833 ): Why not learn from the best? His method and hand placement is very similar to Michael Close's, so I decided this is what I have to do if I want to become automatic with it.

Right now, I'm just challenging myself to do 8 perfect shuffles to bring the deck back to new deck order. If I miss the cut or I miss the weave, I reset the deck and start that step over again. After every round of 8 perfects I take a little break and try to think consciously about the technique.

Here's my journey of time trials.
03/24 - Attempt 1: 39 minutes.
03/25 - Attempt 2: 24 minutes. Attempt 3: 19 minutes. Attempt 4: 8.5 minutes (hopefully not just a fluke, I think I may have found a little knack that helps with aligning the cards and ensuring they are 100% SUPER SQUARE before I start applying pressure). Attempt 5: 6.5 minutes! Getting there!
03/26 - Attempt 6: 7.5 minutes, Attempt 7: 12.5 minutes (uh oh)
[managed to slice my finger open on 03/27, so working on some stuff that doesn't involve the left index finger so profoundly lol]
03/29 - Back at it, Attempt 8: 14 minutes (oh boy, we're really going in the wrong direction), Attempt 9: 11 minutes.

I hope I didn't annoy you with my rambling, I'm just excited to share the journey with somebody else who recently went down the same path πŸ˜‰
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #54 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheYGC
Thank you so much for posting this thread. It's actually what inspired me to finally register for an account here instead of lurking in the shadows, because I wanted to share my journey to perfection with some like-minded people. There have definitely been times where I want to give up -- why am I not getting any better? Why do I get it perfect sometimes, but not others? Seeing that everyone has gone through the same phase is really opening my eyes. πŸ˜‰

I haven't been practicing card magic for very long (only ~5 months or so), but I'm absolutely obsessed with it and the beauty of Faros has me absolutely hooked. Currently, I'm working on perfecting my Faros to be able to perform Paul Gertner's Unshuffled as well as a few other cool routines. Hopefully I can revisit this post in a couple months and be a confident Faro shuffler πŸ˜‰

I first learned how to do a "Faro" about a month ago, but decided to start working on using it as a card sleight and striving for perfection about a week ago. I also managed to slice my left index finger pretty bad over the weekend so that wasn't great, lol. My goal is to get 8 in under 2 minutes before the end of April -- for that, I need to become way more consistent. I never have more than two "doubles" in the deck, but they appear in random places -- sometimes at the very start (ie: bottom) of the weave, sometimes at the very end of the weave, and sometimes in the middle. So I feel like I'm getting there, but just missing one tiny little knack to get it consistently perfect.

Resources I've used to learn (and some quick comments):
Chris Ramsay's YouTube Tutorial ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=134LJpwU5lE&nbsp[wink]: The first way I learned to Faro -- vertical packets. I find I have a bit less control vertically than horizontally, though. When first starting out, I think this is a good way to understand the basic mechanics of what the cards have to do.
TheVirts - Perfect Faro & Cascade ( https://shop.thevirts.com/products/perfect-faro ): I love cardistry and wanted to learn how to do the flourish smoothly at the end, and the cascade is really pretty. With that being said, Huron's method didn't quite work consistently for me. I tried for about 4 hours and didn't get a perfect Faro once, so I decided to go back to the drawing board. Might revisit this after I'm more confident with my weaving, as I think it's actually the smoothest performance I've seen of the Faro (least moving parts).
Michael Close - Learn the Faro Shuffle ( https://www.michaelclose.com/products/learn-the-faro-shuffle-download ): Awesome tips and tricks here, really helped with hand placement and prepping the deck. 
Paul Gertner - Unshuffling the Faro Shuffle ( https://www.penguinmagic.com/p/4833 ): Why not learn from the best? His method and hand placement is very similar to Michael Close's, so I decided this is what I have to do if I want to become automatic with it.

Right now, I'm just challenging myself to do 8 perfect shuffles to bring the deck back to new deck order. If I miss the cut or I miss the weave, I reset the deck and start that step over again. After every round of 8 perfects I take a little break and try to think consciously about the technique.

Here's my journey of time trials.
03/24 - Attempt 1: 39 minutes.
03/25 - Attempt 2: 24 minutes. Attempt 3: 19 minutes. Attempt 4: 8.5 minutes (hopefully not just a fluke, I think I may have found a little knack that helps with aligning the cards and ensuring they are 100% SUPER SQUARE before I start applying pressure). Attempt 5: 6.5 minutes! Getting there!
03/26 - Attempt 6: 7.5 minutes, Attempt 7: 12.5 minutes (uh oh)
[managed to slice my finger open on 03/27, so working on some stuff that doesn't involve the left index finger so profoundly lol]
03/29 - Back at it, Attempt 8: 14 minutes (oh boy, we're really going in the wrong direction), Attempt 9: 11 minutes.

I hope I didn't annoy you with my rambling, I'm just excited to share the journey with somebody else who recently went down the same path πŸ˜‰


Please don't be put off by my question, but why have a goal to be able to do 8 perfect faros inside of 2 minutes?  Hopefully just for fun and the sake of doing it.  I'm sure you've realized that a layperson would never be interested in sitting through that.  No matter  what the result.  So again, if it is just for fun, then I guess go for it.

To me it would be better to practice the faro in the context of a trick.  A trick such as unshuffled is perfect.  Being able to nail even one perfect faro in a performing setting is a feat for many people.  If you can do multiples, you are way ahead of the game.  I think that is where you should set your sights.
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Matt G

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Reply with quote  #55 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ


Please don't be put off by my question, but why have a goal to be able to do 8 perfect faros inside of 2 minutes?  Hopefully just for fun and the sake of doing it.  I'm sure you've realized that a layperson would never be interested in sitting through that.  No matter  what the result.  So again, if it is just for fun, then I guess go for it.

To me it would be better to practice the faro in the context of a trick.  A trick such as unshuffled is perfect.  Being able to nail even one perfect faro in a performing setting is a feat for many people.  If you can do multiples, you are way ahead of the game.  I think that is where you should set your sights.


In truth, I'm a very quantitative person; this goal of resettting a deck in two minutes is just a tangible method of measuring performance, consistency, and results. Of course, nobody is going to sit there and watch me shuffle cards for two minutes, and there are much more practical false shuffles if I need to control all 52 πŸ˜‰

With that being said, I do feel like it's a good target -- if I could average 1 perfect shuffle per 15 seconds (ie: a success rate of about 80% or so), I would feel definitely confident performing a trick that requires 1, 2, or 3 in a row in front of an audience (of friends and family, at least...). Another practical goal of mine is to be able to go from brand new deck to Tamariz's Mnemonica in front of an audience as well πŸ˜‰
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chris w

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Reply with quote  #56 
Once you can do it well, I think there's a benefit to being able to do it as quickly as possible. Especially as a slow faro often means there are starts, stops, and excessive concentrations and grimaces that make it look studied and less than fluid.

I do timed trials myself. It helps.

But to start, yes, I would put doing it well and consistently over doing it fast.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #57 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheYGC


In truth, I'm a very quantitative person; this goal of resettting a deck in two minutes is just a tangible method of measuring performance, consistency, and results. Of course, nobody is going to sit there and watch me shuffle cards for two minutes, and there are much more practical false shuffles if I need to control all 52 πŸ˜‰

With that being said, I do feel like it's a good target -- if I could average 1 perfect shuffle per 15 seconds (ie: a success rate of about 80% or so), I would feel definitely confident performing a trick that requires 1, 2, or 3 in a row in front of an audience (of friends and family, at least...). Another practical goal of mine is to be able to go from brand new deck to Tamariz's Mnemonica in front of an audience as well πŸ˜‰


Cool, good reasons, carry on then!  I'll just shuffle off to another thread. [biggrin]
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Matt G

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Reply with quote  #58 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris w
Once you can do it well, I think there's a benefit to being able to do it as quickly as possible. Especially as a slow faro often means there are starts, stops, and excessive concentrations and grimaces that make it look studied and less than fluid.

I do timed trials myself. It helps.

But to start, yes, I would put doing it well and consistently over doing it fast.
Hi chris, thanks for the feedback! I guess I'm having a bit of difficulty separating the two -- I'm never consciously thinking "boy I need to do this fast!", it's just, if I get 8 perfect ones in a row, it'll be much faster than the 8-15 minutes it takes me now. Maybe 2 minutes is a bit unreasonable, but I find that every time I do it perfect, it takes about 10 seconds. 

Maybe I need to slow down and make sure every movement is precise and consistent? I'm far more interested in doing it correctly than doing it quickly, I'm just not sure how.
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chris w

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Reply with quote  #59 
Hmm. I see what you're saying.

I think that getting it to work consistently has everything to do with deck condition, hand/packet position, and applying the right bit of pressure at the right point. Once that's working, you'll be doing them at a certain speed just by virtue of not having to weave and unweave repeatedly for each shuffle.

Then, if you want, you can think about eliminating extraneous finger movement and hand repositioning to speed it up even more. You won't really know how to do that in your case until you're at that point of hitting the weave most of the time.

Eight shuffles in 2 minutes is not unreasonable once the weave is happening fairly automatically.

It's a feel thing that I'm sure will come to you with continued practice. In the grand scheme of the aggravation often experienced while trying to acquire a faro shuffle, you haven't been attempting it all that long. Keep at it! [wink]
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #60 
[thumb][biggrin]

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Matt G

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Reply with quote  #61 
And here I am, excited when I do 8 in less than 4 minutes πŸ˜ƒ 100 perfect ones in a row...for now I can only dream, lol.

(A quick update on my progress, for anyone interestedπŸ˜‰

I bought a deck of Tally-Hos that arrived last Monday, and since then I've been using it to practice. It works great! I also took a little break to learn the Cascade, as taught by The Virts. Boy is it pretty. And actually super practical for the effect I want to eventually perform, Unshuffled. The way I weave vertical, so it's pretty much already in the V formation when I finish the weave, so I can just drop it from the left hand into the right, tilt the hand a bit, and square up and show the Unshuffling as it occurs. I quite like the direction it's headed in πŸ˜‰

Anyways, with the new deck, I'm now consistently getting under 4 minutes per cycle of 8. My personal best is 2:35 when I did 6 of the 8 perfectly on the first try. I've been trying to do 10-20 sets a day. Every once in a while the Ace of Hearts gets a little bent in the corner so I put it back under some textbooks and take a break to do my actual job πŸ˜‹

But the point is: new deck (Tally-Hos) and another week of practice and the goal is seeming very attainable. Also I've gone down the rabbit hole of online shopping for cards...it was a mistake...the quarantine has left me with far too much time for online shopping...
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Matt G

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Reply with quote  #62 
Well, it's now officially the end of April and so I thought I'd share a quick update to anybody who cares about the progress of a total newbie magician πŸ˜ƒ

I am still sometimes a bit slow in the get-ready which is preventing me from getting it under a minute, (personal best run so far has been 1:12) but I am consistently getting 5 sets of 8 in under 8 minutes, for an average of ~1:40 per set of eight shuffles. I've been practicing with two decks: Tally-Ho Circle Back and Aviators, and both seem to work better for me than standard Bikes. Practice routine is 5 timed sets of 8 with Tally-Hos, then 5 timed sets of 8 with Aviators, and then a dozen or so In-Faros with an older deck of Bikes I use for other magic practice. I am still working on perfecting the 26-cut with no key-card, but am so much better at it than I was even a month ago.

I have also learned and performed a few great effects with the Faro including Unshuffled (the reason I dove down the rabbit-hole to begin with) and Vernash Aces which I think is an awesome 4-ace production. Ackerman's Any Sandwich is next on my to-do list but it requires a few more techniques that I'm not so smooth at.

Anyways, in case anybody who is discouraged about their ability to perfect it, perhaps seeing somebody with not much magic experience can help encourage you as well, just as watching some pros struggle with it encouraged me to not give up πŸ˜‰ On March 24th, it took me almost 40 minutes to get a deck back to NDO using Faros. On April 30th, it typically takes me under 100 seconds. Don't be afraid to make mistakes and keep practicing correctly!
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chris w

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Reply with quote  #63 
Congratulations on your success and thanks for giving this update, TheYGC. I'm sure it will be heartening to others coming along to see how much progress can be made on the faro in just one month!
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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #64 
One book that improved magic for me--my magic ? --was Leading with YourHead by Gary Kurtz. It is mostly about misdirection and movement. Stuff like that. Not as hard to find as it used to be. I bought at one of his lectures.
Glad you are having fun. ☺
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StevePR104

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Reply with quote  #65 
This is NOT an ad...rather, it's my own experience and idea:

Just picked up a deck of the Bicycle Cobalts.  And I honestly have to say that I don't know if I've ever played with a deck of cards so supple and ready to faro from the moment I opened the box.

With the deck, I was able to do the eight outfaros needed to restore a deck to NDO...and I accomplished it with an absolute minimum of trouble.

So it gave me the idea of working with a brand-new, still sealed deck of Cobalts when I perform....doing two out-faros...putting them to the side...doing an effect or two with another deck..then going back to the Cobalts and doing two more...and repeating two more times.

The end result would be a continued callback that ends up with the deck in the same order as when you started...but spaced throughout the act, instead of eight out-faros at once.

I'll let you know how it goes.






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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #66 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StevePR104
This is NOT an ad...rather, it's my own experience and idea:

Just picked up a deck of the Bicycle Cobalts.  And I honestly have to say that I don't know if I've ever played with a deck of cards so supple and ready to faro from the moment I opened the box.

With the deck, I was able to do the eight outfaros needed to restore a deck to NDO...and I accomplished it with an absolute minimum of trouble.

So it gave me the idea of working with a brand-new, still sealed deck of Cobalts when I perform....doing two out-faros...putting them to the side...doing an effect or two with another deck..then going back to the Cobalts and doing two more...and repeating two more times.

The end result would be a continued callback that ends up with the deck in the same order as when you started...but spaced throughout the act, instead of eight out-faros at once.

I'll let you know how it goes.

Good to know.  I think people should report stuff like this when they find something that works.  Walgreen's had some Cobalts in stock the other day for $9.99 or something like that.  They go on sale, buy one, get one 1/2 off sometimes.  I might plunk down some cash next time they go on sale.  

It is going to be hard to pull the trigger though, given that I probably have two lifetimes of cards in boxes already.  I found some Bicycle New Fan Backs and Racer Backs, unopened in a box the other day.  And trust me, so long as you keep them cool and dry, when you open them, they are awesome.  I heard others say cards deteriorate with age, even unopened and wrapped, but that has not been my experience.






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