Sign up Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Barrett S

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 354
Reply with quote  #1 
Hello Everyone,

I am looking to learn a card transpo trick.  Probably zillions out there.  May I ask if anyone would be kind enough to recommend one?

Thanks!

__________________
Barrett
0
zarrow52

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 122
Reply with quote  #2 
Insto-Transpo. p. 110 in Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic.

I created a version of this that adds to the nice transposition.

Sean
0
Michaelblue

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,294
Reply with quote  #3 
One of my favorites is John Bannon's Box Jumper from the book High Caliber. It's also in the Bullet Party book.
0
Unfinished Sentenc

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 131
Reply with quote  #4 
Despite its simplicity, Dr. Daley's Last Trick gets great reactions from laymen. 

If you are comfortable with doing top change, Eddie Fechter's Be Honest, What It Is a very excellent effect as well. 
0
Charlie

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 264
Reply with quote  #5 
I like the altman maneuver which can be found in harry lorayne best of friends 1 or 2 or paul harris art of astonishment.

Paul harris expanded on it an created a multiple sequence transposition in stars of magic dvd 2, japh maneuver.
0
Barrett S

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 354
Reply with quote  #6 
Wow!  Thank you everyone!

It's funny, and this has been said before, now I know why I have a "magic library."  I am fortunate to be associated with folks that know what is in MY library more than I do :-)

Thanks again!

__________________
Barrett
0
magicfish

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,302
Reply with quote  #7 
IceBreaker by Swain
0
trinimontes

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 307
Reply with quote  #8 
Two-Card Force Field Ceremony (Card Fixes - Jon Racherbaumer 1990 pg.161-164) is a nice easy to do yet powerful transposition.

Twist N Transpo (Good Turn and Twists - Jon Racherbaumer 1977)




Best,
Trini
0
Paul Hallas

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,154
Reply with quote  #9 
The classic two card transpo. It's been in print a lot though cannot give  specific reference. In the Dai Vernon book of Magic it's dressed a little differently, you're guessing repeatedly whether your spectator is thinking of the red or black card on the table by dropping your hand on it, eventually when you're wrong it turns out you're right! I'm sure Trini or someone else can give an exact reference, my copy of the book is still in England.

Peter Duffie had a great version of the two card transpo where both cards are signed. I think he called it "Clear Transpo"

Usually the two card transpo incorporates a dupe but the latter two routines do not. Jay Sankey had some nice work on it in some lecture notes at one time, a three part routine. In a restaurant with kids I've has them all pile their hands on top of one card etc.

It shouldn't be overlooked as it's just two objects changing places with no extra cards in play, cannot be clearer than that. 

A fun transposition I like is a packet trick of mine where I have four cards with hands on and four blanks. It was part of the Handy Trick Collection DVD which supplies the cards plus some other routines, but the transposition part was fully detailed in my book "Small But Deadly" as "The Hand is Quicker Than the Eye".  I was using that just last night at a restaurant gig, and since that book was published back in 2002 it shows its been in my repertoire a while. 

Harris's "Grasshopper"  was in my repertoire many years ago, and for the odd special occasion Peter Samelson's "New York Transpo" from his book "Theatrical Close-Up"

AS for Swain's "Icebreaker" mentioned earlier, I really don't like to start with any effect where it appears I failed initially. It's nice but not as an opener as it was supposedly intended for.  Impressions are made within seconds.

 There really are lots of transpo effects out there and there are no bad ones that come to mind.
0
trinimontes

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 307
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Hallas
The classic two card transpo. It's been in print a lot though cannot give  specific reference. In the Dai Vernon book of Magic it's dressed a little differently, you're guessing repeatedly whether your spectator is thinking of the red or black card on the table by dropping your hand on it, eventually when you're wrong it turns out you're right! I'm sure Trini or someone else can give an exact reference, my copy of the book is still in England.



Paul,
I think the effect you are talking about is The Challenge(The Dai Vernon Book of Magic - 1957 pg.114). I remember playing with this effect a long time ago. The construction of the presentation is very strong. Thank you for reminding me of this one. Its a great little effect.




Best,
Trini
0
Paul Hallas

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,154
Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by trinimontes



Paul,
I think the effect you are talking about is The Challenge(The Dai Vernon Book of Magic - 1957 pg.114). I remember playing with this effect a long time ago. The construction of the presentation is very strong. Thank you for reminding me of this one. Its a great little effect.

Best,
Trini


That's it!  My memory is starting to go. David Britland once had a version of it with business cards.

In the past, I've started with "The Challenge" then routined it with the classic two card transposition.

At one time I used to do a variant on the Vernon routine with two small colored balls. That routine of mine appeared in print in one of Mark Leveridge's  British Close Up Magic Symposium books.
0
Barrett S

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 354
Reply with quote  #12 
Wow!  Double and triple thanks to all.

Just in case anyone cares, I am going to see "Suzanne" lecture tonight in Chicago :-)

This has not too much to do with transpo, but I am a big fan and thought I'd give her a shout out.

__________________
Barrett
0
Gerald Deutsch

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 330
Reply with quote  #13 
Peter Marshall has "Deceptive Transposition" in the August 1986 issue of Apocalypse and I have "Something Strange" in the March 1994 issue.
0
magicfish

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,302
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Hallas
The classic two card transpo. It's been in print a lot though cannot give  specific reference. In the Dai Vernon book of Magic it's dressed a little differently, you're guessing repeatedly whether your spectator is thinking of the red or black card on the table by dropping your hand on it, eventually when you're wrong it turns out you're right! I'm sure Trini or someone else can give an exact reference, my copy of the book is still in England.

Peter Duffie had a great version of the two card transpo where both cards are signed. I think he called it "Clear Transpo"

Usually the two card transpo incorporates a dupe but the latter two routines do not. Jay Sankey had some nice work on it in some lecture notes at one time, a three part routine. In a restaurant with kids I've has them all pile their hands on top of one card etc.

It shouldn't be overlooked as it's just two objects changing places with no extra cards in play, cannot be clearer than that. 

A fun transposition I like is a packet trick of mine where I have four cards with hands on and four blanks. It was part of the Handy Trick Collection DVD which supplies the cards plus some other routines, but the transposition part was fully detailed in my book "Small But Deadly" as "The Hand is Quicker Than the Eye".  I was using that just last night at a restaurant gig, and since that book was published back in 2002 it shows its been in my repertoire a while. 

Harris's "Grasshopper"  was in my repertoire many years ago, and for the odd special occasion Peter Samelson's "New York Transpo" from his book "Theatrical Close-Up"

AS for Swain's "Icebreaker" mentioned earlier, I really don't like to start with any effect where it appears I failed initially. It's nice but not as an opener as it was supposedly intended for.  Impressions are made within seconds.

 There really are lots of transpo effects out there and there are no bad ones that come to mind.

I agree with Swain that it makes a terrific opener.
But different strokes for different folks, Paul.
I'll list a few more here as this is one of my favourite plots. : )

P.S. I like Grasshopper too!
0
magicfish

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,302
Reply with quote  #15 
In The Palm of Your Hand

An L.J. classic.
0
magicfish

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,302
Reply with quote  #16 
The Famed Two Card and Glass Juggle- Lovell.

This version of Fingered Number Two was published in Sisti's Magic Menu and has been a favourite of mine for a while. Great for the bar!
0
magicfish

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,302
Reply with quote  #17 
All Roads Lead to Larry- David Regal

This is a gem of a transpo from Constant Fooling 1.
A delightful tribute to the master.
0
magicfish

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,302
Reply with quote  #18 
Another nice little 2 card transpo can be found in Aronson's Try the Impossible. It's called Head Over Heels Transpo. Quick, convincing, impromptu, magical.
0
magicfish

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,302
Reply with quote  #19 
tmfbls, Im presuming you're talking specifically about two card transpos?
0
Charlie

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 264
Reply with quote  #20 
Paul harris hiccup is another card transport I use to great effect
0
Kingman

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 205
Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michaelblue
One of my favorites is John Bannon's Box Jumper from the book High Caliber. It's also in the Bullet Party book.

I agree with this one heartily, but if you don't have the books, good luck getting them.
Unfortunately it is the same for the ones from Darwin Ortiz that I would recommend. The books are not available to often and when they are, they cost.
Could get videos of them performing them though. I know that Bullet Party is still available.

__________________
Kingman
kingman@magicofkingman.com
http:// http://magifofkingman.blogspot.com/

[Card%2BSharp%2B3]
0
Paul Hallas

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,154
Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicfish
I agree with Swain that it makes a terrific opener. But different strokes for different folks, Paul.


I guess it is. I don't think it's a bad effect, magician in trouble (a category it falls into) is an entertaining angle I've used myself. I just want to clarify my thinking. You'd probably agree when entertaining first impressions count? Also the first thing you want to do if entertaining with  card magic is distinguish yourself from uncle Joe who knows a few card tricks or every third  teenager on the web who does poor card magic.   So, if strolling around doing magic approaching strangers at say a reception, and you initially appear to have blown it, the first thing that pops into someone's head is possibly, "Why did this goofball interrupt us?" Id rather the first thought be, "OK he knows what he's doing" or "Wow, that was good".  Sure, with Icebreaker you quickly recover but why put even the tiniest bit of doubt there with your important initial contact ? There are far better openers.

Now if you're entertaining people that know you already, friends and family, people that have seen you before, then I don't think it matters one bit. For strangers I wouldn't think any kind of magician in trouble syndrome  is a good opening effect. Within the body of your routine/act is better positioning. They like you at that point (hopefully) and 'feel' for you if something apparently went wrong. 

BTW I think the Paul LePaul flourish in Icebreaker is good for finding two selected cards, I think Karrell Fox used it that way. 

So yes Icebreaker is a good transposition, I just don't think its titled correctly [smile] You can use it however you want.  


0
Magic-Aly

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 607
Reply with quote  #23 
PAUL HALLAS WROTE: "I really don't like to start with any effect where it appears I failed initially. It's nice but not as an opener as it was supposedly intended for.  Impressions are made within seconds.. I just want to clarify my thinking. You'd probably agree when entertaining first impressions count? Also the first thing you want to do if entertaining with  card magic is distinguish yourself from uncle Joe who knows a few card tricks or every third  teenager on the web who does poor card magic.   So, if strolling around doing magic approaching strangers at say a reception, and you initially appear to have blown it, the first thing that pops into someone's head is possibly, "Why did this goofball interrupt us?"

That makes a lot of sense.  It has been said, "You never get a second chance to make a first impression." So if the first trick for people who have never seen you is a trick you apparently screwed up, the first impression is negative.  The best you can then do is to make a good second impression, which may somewhat mitigate the ill effects of the first impression, but cannot undo it.
0
Paul Hallas

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,154
Reply with quote  #24 
Another gem of a transpo I've used a lot on and off over the years is Max Maven's "Tearable". I had it when it was marketed years ago but it can also be found in the book "Focus". However, after the first couple of times, I never used it as a deck trick. My half cards are already cut and carried in my Stockholder wallet. All the pieces are shown to have backs initially with a Flushtration count as I comment that I asked someone to cut the cards last night and this is what they did. In fact I can do ten minutes in need be just with what's in the Stockholder wallet which fits nicely in a trouser pocket or shirt pocket. I don't normally, but I have used "Tearable" as an opener. The fact you are doing something with half cards is interesting, something lay folk don't normally see.
0
magicfish

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,302
Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Hallas


I guess it is. I don't think it's a bad effect, magician in trouble (a category it falls into) is an entertaining angle I've used myself. I just want to clarify my thinking. You'd probably agree when entertaining first impressions count? Also the first thing you want to do if entertaining with  card magic is distinguish yourself from uncle Joe who knows a few card tricks or every third  teenager on the web who does poor card magic.   So, if strolling around doing magic approaching strangers at say a reception, and you initially appear to have blown it, the first thing that pops into someone's head is possibly, "Why did this goofball interrupt us?" Id rather the first thought be, "OK he knows what he's doing" or "Wow, that was good".  Sure, with Icebreaker you quickly recover but why put even the tiniest bit of doubt there with your important initial contact ? There are far better openers.

Now if you're entertaining people that know you already, friends and family, people that have seen you before, then I don't think it matters one bit. For strangers I wouldn't think any kind of magician in trouble syndrome  is a good opening effect. Within the body of your routine/act is better positioning. They like you at that point (hopefully) and 'feel' for you if something apparently went wrong. 

BTW I think the Paul LePaul flourish in Icebreaker is good for finding two selected cards, I think Karrell Fox used it that way. 

So yes Icebreaker is a good transposition, I just don't think its titled correctly [smile] You can use it however you want.  



They may think that for a second, but the rectification is so strong, that that initial impression of "goofball" makes the result- and their impression, even stronger!
They think, "boy was I wrong, this guy is the real deal. I wonder what else he can do..." Now they're pàying even closer attention and salivating for the next item.
Just my opinion.
0
Paul Hallas

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,154
Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicfish
They may think that for a second, but the rectification is so strong, that that initial impression of "goofball" makes the result- and their impression, even stronger! They think, "boy was I wrong, this guy is the real deal. I wonder what else he can do..." Now they're pàying even closer attention and salivating for the next item. Just my opinion.


I've worked some venues over the years where I'm sure if they thought you'd got it wrong they would have turned and walked away!(or used a few expletives). However, if they are sat down they can't walk away. I could be wrong, but I'm not sure Jim Swain did many walk around gigs. More sat at the table stuff. Of course, now he's a successful novelist. I do have one of his crime novels but not read it yet. 

You are entitled to your opinion and the routine has obviously worked very well for you as an "Icebreaker" so far. I will say no more on the matter. 
0
Magic-Aly

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 607
Reply with quote  #27 
IMHO, the respective views of Paul and MagicFish, have both been well articulated. My own approach would be to do a strong effect or two first before doing a "magician in trouble" effect.  Thus, their first impression of the magician's skill will be very favorable and firmly established.  Then when all of a sudden they see the magician in trouble, they will more likely feel sympathetic than scornful, and when the magician triumphantly extricates himself out of the jam, and redeems himself, the reaction should bring great astonishment, laughter and admiration. Of course, the only true laboratory to test the validity of any theory and find what works best, is repeated experimentation in the actual performance arena.  The spectators are our best teachers.
0
Barrett S

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 354
Reply with quote  #28 
So much GREAT information.  Thank you all.



__________________
Barrett
0
trinimontes

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 307
Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic-Aly
IMHO, the respective views of Paul and MagicFish, have both been well articulated. My own approach would be to do a strong effect or two first before doing a "magician in trouble" effect.  Thus, their first impression of the magician's skill will be very favorable and firmly established.  Then when all of a sudden they see the magician in trouble, they will more likely feel sympathetic than scornful, and when the magician triumphantly extricates himself out of the jam, and redeems himself, the reaction should bring great astonishment, laughter and admiration. Of course, the only true laboratory to test the validity of any theory and find what works best, is repeated experimentation in the actual performance arena.  The spectators are our best teachers.


Magic-Aly,
This also depends on how the "Magician in Trouble" effect is presented. One thing I learned from Racherbaumer was to NEVER perform an effect that can be-little your spectator. This can cause embarrassment, and then can make you look like a jerk. For example, when performing the card to mouth routine... When the spectator sees that their card is hanging from the magician's mouth, it is important to act as surprised as they are. Enjoy the "magical moment" with them, smile with them, laugh with them, for this makes the entire atmosphere fun, and not so tense for either party.



Best,
Trini
0
Magic-Aly

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 607
Reply with quote  #30 
TRINI WROTE: "Magic-Aly,
This also depends on how the "Magician in Trouble" effect is presented. One thing I learned from Racherbaumer was to NEVER perform an effect that can be-little your spectator. This can cause embarrassment, and then can make you look like a jerk. For example, when performing the card to mouth routine... When the spectator sees that their card is hanging from the magician's mouth, it is important to act as surprised as they are. Enjoy the "magical moment" with them, smile with them, laugh with them, for this makes the entire atmosphere fun, and not so tense for either party."

Trini, I definitely agree with you and Mr. Racherbaumer.

PS Quite honestly, while it is a surprise, I never liked the card in mouth effect - it always struck me as kind of unsavory, and the spectators are not likely to want to touch the cards after that. I do love card on the forehead, however.  Just my opinion.


0
Paul Hallas

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,154
Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic-Aly
TRINI WROTE: "Magic-Aly,
This also depends on how the "Magician in Trouble" effect is presented. One thing I learned from Racherbaumer was to NEVER perform an effect that can be-little your spectator. This can cause embarrassment, and then can make you look like a jerk. For example, when performing the card to mouth routine... When the spectator sees that their card is hanging from the magician's mouth, it is important to act as surprised as they are. Enjoy the "magical moment" with them, smile with them, laugh with them, for this makes the entire atmosphere fun, and not so tense for either party."

Trini, I definitely agree with you and Mr. Racherbaumer.

PS Quite honestly, while it is a surprise, I never liked the card in mouth effect - it always struck me as kind of unsavory, and the spectators are not likely to want to touch the cards after that. I do love card on the forehead, however.  Just my opinion.




I tend to agree that for a restaurant performer card to forehead is preferable to anything in the mouth where you could possibly end up with saliva on your fingers etc. What are you handling touching next? I also remember a lecture years ago where the lecturer had stopped doing card to forehead. After one performance he was approached by an elderly Jewish man who had been in Auschwitch and told him he had felt degraded by the trick.... Okay, its an extreme example but it has happened.

I should add, I don't think all 'magician in trouble' effects are 'sucker' effects.  



0
magicfish

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,302
Reply with quote  #32 
Your Favourite Card- Lorayne, Special Effects.
Done as Harry instructs as a follow up to a selected card revelation, this might be one of the strongest 2 card transpos
In magic.
0
Harry Lorayne

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,376
Reply with quote  #33 
     Interesting - because of many requests to do so, better/easier handling of Your Favorite Card will be included in the book I'm working on at the moment - AND FINALLY!
0
James Sievert

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 164
Reply with quote  #34 

Barrett,

For a concentrated dose of transpositions, look for a copy of Karl Fulves' "Transpo Trix" from 1978. It's been out of print for years, so I'm going to guess it's on the pricey side.


__________________

Rev 21:4
2 Cor 4:16-18

Jeremiah 11:29
Isaiah 55:8,9
Isaiah 41:10

0
arthur stead

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,047
Reply with quote  #35 

See my “One Card Transpo” post in the Session Room.


__________________
http://www.arthurstead.com
0
Harry Lorayne

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,376
Reply with quote  #36 
If you like transposition effects - at the moment I can't think of a stronger one than S/H/F Killer (JD2).
0
arthur stead

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,047
Reply with quote  #37 

David Regal has a great card transpo which I occasionally perform.  I learnt it from his first video series (on VHS) a number fo years ago.  I think it might be called Leap Of Faith, but I’m guessing.  

Basically, you place the two red Kings face up to your right, and the two black Kings face up to your left.  The deck is spread face on the table for a spectator to select any card.  The deck then stays out of play while you insert the selected card face down in-between the two red Kings.  In the blink of an eye, that card then suddenly jumps, very cleanly, from between the red Kings, and appears between the black Kings.  Pretty magical!


__________________
http://www.arthurstead.com
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.