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Itsupyoursleeve

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As someone who never uses a table when performing and have had a bit of time on their hands recently I thought I’d give it a go.

I’ve always liked watching a coin matrix but often thought that they can become too ‘complicated’ with too much going on.

With that in mind I came up with the following, hope you like it. 

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Magic Harry

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Reply with quote  #2 
I enjoyed that. Very well done!
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RayJ

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Very nice Paul.  The bare-handed matrix goes way back to Chink-a-Chink, a version of which was published by Edwin Sachs in 1877.  Since then coins, sugar cubes, bottle caps, and even sea shells have been used.  You can buy specially made brass "weights" for the routine and Tommy Wonder used to perform a routine with little chimes made by Auke Van Dokkum.  

[DSC_0194-100x100]

The 'Wandering Chimes' sold at auction for $2,510.00 USD.  

Then there is this cat, who is apparently obsessed with the plot.

https://s759.photobucket.com/user/Fortasse56/library/Chink-a-chink%20collection?sort=6&page=1

Paul, I agree with what you said about some routines being too convoluted.  Many believe Al Schneider's Matrix is the best routine for an assembly using cards and coins.  Simple and direct, no confusion.
I think the "fancy" routines should be kept for impressing other magicians mainly.  I learned probably 6 Matrix-style routines over the years and yet when I do it for laypeople, I go back to a very basic one.
  
Your routine met your criteria and I'm sure will be totally baffling to your audiences.
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Itsupyoursleeve

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Wow $2,510.00!! Thanks for the info and feedback Ray and Harry. I've played around with bottle caps in the past and that always went down well but never done a bare handed matrix. To be honest because most of my stuff is 'in hand' whether that be mine or the spectators i dont think i'll ever be performing it again but i'm glad i did this.
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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #5 
Very nice Itsupyoursleeve, thank you for sharing.

A word about Matrix, as it's a bit of a peev of mine -

The trick posted is not Matrix - it is Chink-a-Chink. The handling posted is a variation on Roths, using the classic method.
As Ray mentions, one of the earliest sources is the Sachs book. It was a favourite of Max Malini.
There is also a nice handling in the Stars of Magic book - I have never used the production ending though.

Matrix is a different trick. It was invented by Al in 1960, and uses four cards to cover the coins. Matrix has its origin in another trick - Yank Hoes Sympathetic Coins, which can be found in numerous books, including Bobos.
This uses two cards only, to cover two of the coins, and uses a handkerchief.

Sympathetic Coins is often (erroneously) refered to as an assembly. It is actually a penetration effect - the coins penetrate the handkerchief (except the last one). In an assembly, the coins vanish from their place, and "assemble" together in another.

While performing Sympathetic Coins, Al noticed that he got better reactions from the last coin, than from the penetrations - which led him to create Matrix.

Matrix is not a generic term, it is a specific trick and handling.



Jim


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RayJ

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Itsupyoursleeve
Wow $2,510.00!! Thanks for the info and feedback Ray and Harry. I've played around with bottle caps in the past and that always went down well but never done a bare handed matrix. To be honest because most of my stuff is 'in hand' whether that be mine or the spectators i dont think i'll ever be performing it again but i'm glad i did this.


Well, now that you've worked it out, you'll be ready in a pinch!
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jim ferguson
Very nice Itsupyoursleeve, thank you for sharing.

A word about Matrix, as it's a bit of a peev of mine -

The trick posted is not Matrix - it is Chink-a-Chink. The handling posted is a variation on Roths, using the classic method.
As Ray mentions, one of the earliest sources is the Sachs book. It was a favourite of Max Malini.
There is also a nice handling in the Stars of Magic book - I have never used the production ending though.

Matrix is a different trick. It was invented by Al in 1960, and uses four cards to cover the coins. Matrix has its origin in another trick - Yank Hoes Sympathetic Coins, which can be found in numerous books, including Bobos.
This uses two cards only, to cover two of the coins, and uses a handkerchief.

Sympathetic Coins is often (erroneously) refered to as an assembly. It is actually a penetration effect - the coins penetrate the handkerchief (except the last one). In an assembly, the coins vanish from their place, and "assemble" together in another.

While performing Sympathetic Coins, Al noticed that he got better reactions from the last coin, than from the penetrations - which led him to create Matrix.

Matrix is not a generic term, it is a specific trick and handling.



Jim




Jim, you are of course correct about 'Matrix' being a specific trick and handling, developed by Al Schneider and published in 1973.  

But as you know the term matrix has gone on to become a term used to categorize a number of effects that resemble the original.  Or at least involve a similar "layout" of cards/coins in a square formation.

The term even has bled over into card magic with assemblies of torn cards gathering and being restored.  

Here are a whole slew of effects that are commonly described as matrix-style.

https://www.conjuringarchive.com/list/search?keyword=matrix
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Magic Harry

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Reply with quote  #8 
It was so well done. You should perform it again and keep it in your magic performances for your audiences.
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Itsupyoursleeve

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jim ferguson
Very nice Itsupyoursleeve, thank you for sharing.

A word about Matrix, as it's a bit of a peev of mine -

The trick posted is not Matrix - it is Chink-a-Chink. The handling posted is a variation on Roths, using the classic method.
As Ray mentions, one of the earliest sources is the Sachs book. It was a favourite of Max Malini.
There is also a nice handling in the Stars of Magic book - I have never used the production ending though.

Matrix is a different trick. It was invented by Al in 1960, and uses four cards to cover the coins. Matrix has its origin in another trick - Yank Hoes Sympathetic Coins, which can be found in numerous books, including Bobos.
This uses two cards only, to cover two of the coins, and uses a handkerchief.

Sympathetic Coins is often (erroneously) refered to as an assembly. It is actually a penetration effect - the coins penetrate the handkerchief (except the last one). In an assembly, the coins vanish from their place, and "assemble" together in another.

While performing Sympathetic Coins, Al noticed that he got better reactions from the last coin, than from the penetrations - which led him to create Matrix.

Matrix is not a generic term, it is a specific trick and handling.



Jim




Cheers Jim, pet peevs are something we all have in one way or another and some of us thrive on them more than others but i generally don't see them as a bad thing, i simply see them as something that someone is passionate about.

Interesting information though and i appreciate you sharing it with me 😉
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rready

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Reply with quote  #10 
Nicely done.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #11 
Another "organic" idea would be to use ice cubes.  Not my idea, Dan Fleshman did this many, many years ago.  I don't remember if it was his idea or not.  At the time he was using fake cubes from a children's game, but they make some nowadays that you cannot tell from real ice.  You could also do a large production, perhaps of a real cube of ice.  Shades of Malini....

[Reusable-Artificial-Ice-Acrylic-Ice-Cubes-Fake-Crystal-for-Fruit-Beer-Whisky-Drinks-Decoration-DIY-Accessories]
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