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SamtheNotsoMagnificent

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Reply with quote  #1 
Every person I see who does the French Drop false transfer reaches for the coin with their fingers together whether they are reaching either with just their fingertips or grasping at the coin with the whole hand.

My thinking was that if I reach for the coin I could take advantage of the retention effect by leaving my fingers spread so they could see the shiny coin through my fingers until the very last instant and I think it looks more natural this than with stiff, straight fingers, so that's the way I've been doing it. As far as I can tell, it works.

Does anyone else do it this way, or is there a reason why I shouldn't do it this way that I'm missing?

Best,
Sam

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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #2 
Nope, it works and works well. Jeff Copeland has an excellent course on the venerable French Drop that he calls Tresor. It's on his website, and makes use of his DAVE platform, in my book the best online learning platform for magic. He teaches a variation that echoes and resonates with what you describe. He also takes a hackneyed sleight and breathes new life into it.

I realize I've recently dropped Jeff's name a couple of times. I'm not repping for him, just impressed with his product, skill, and commitment. He's a magician making products for magicians. Pretty cool. 

Av
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamtheNotsoMagnificent
Every person I see who does the French Drop false transfer reaches for the coin with their fingers together whether they are reaching either with just their fingertips or grasping at the coin with the whole hand.

My thinking was that if I reach for the coin I could take advantage of the retention effect by leaving my fingers spread so they could see the shiny coin through my fingers until the very last instant and I think it looks more natural this than with stiff, straight fingers, so that's the way I've been doing it. As far as I can tell, it works.

Does anyone else do it this way, or is there a reason why I shouldn't do it this way that I'm missing?

Best,
Sam



Nothing at all wrong with your thinking. As with anything else try to keep it casual and don't make it look like a move.

To me the key is to justify why you are doing it. Don't fall into the trap of picking up the coin with the RH to place it into the LH only to return and "take" it with the RH again. So pick it up with the left. Or, if the coin is to your right, slide it to your left maybe so you can grab it.
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SamtheNotsoMagnificent

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony Vinson
Nope, it works and works well. Jeff Copeland has an excellent course on the venerable French Drop that he calls Tresor. It's on his website, and makes use of his DAVE platform, in my book the best online learning platform for magic. He teaches a variation that echoes and resonates with what you describe. He also takes a hackneyed sleight and breathes new life into it.

I realize I've recently dropped Jeff's name a couple of times. I'm not repping for him, just impressed with his product, skill, and commitment. He's a magician making products for magicians. Pretty cool. 

Av


He has some really nice coins for sale! Thanks for the response, I was unsure if my logic was working or not. It's nice to get a confirmation.
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SamtheNotsoMagnificent

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ


Nothing at all wrong with your thinking. As with anything else try to keep it casual and don't make it look like a move.

To me the key is to justify why you are doing it. Don't fall into the trap of picking up the coin with the RH to place it into the LH only to return and "take" it with the RH again. So pick it up with the left. Or, if the coin is to your right, slide it to your left maybe so you can grab it.


I don't have a coin routine just yet, mostly I practice transitioning from one palm to another as an exercise, but I do have a halfway-decent coins across and a very rough matrix that I'm working on now. I have an electronic copy of Bobo, the one that's in the public domain, but I find it difficult to learn from that book for variouis reasons. I also prefer to learn sleights in the context of learning a trick because it helps me understand what the principles are that I am supposed to employ. When I understand the principles behind something, I can use them in other places or exchange a move to do the same thing. That's why I use open fingers in my French drop, I learned about retention vanishes and thought I could apply the same principle to the French Drop and make it even better. But as I am learning, I wanted to get a confirmation that I was thinking correctly.

Thanks for the reply,
Sam
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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #6 
I agree with Anthony...Jeff Copland rocks.

I have Tresor, but I haven't really looked at it yet, BUT I have had a lot of fun with Jeff Copland's "Corner Pocket"....


https://www.copelandcoins.com/products/corner-pocket


I was looking to do something more than just make a coin vanish and reappear, and "Corner Pocket" is a simple, cool routine that utilizes your pants' pockets.

I had a few questions and Jeff was very helpful.

-Buffalo


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luvisi

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Reply with quote  #7 
Gary Ouellet describes two versions of the French Drop in Close Up Illusions (1990) that utilize the principle of keeping the coin visible between the fingers until the last moment to create a retention of vision effect.

They are the Schneider Retention Drop (p 121) and The Ultimate French Drop (p 123).

Andru
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SamtheNotsoMagnificent

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvisi
Gary Ouellet describes two versions of the French Drop in Close Up Illusions (1990) that utilize the principle of keeping the coin visible between the fingers until the last moment to create a retention of vision effect.

They are the Schneider Retention Drop (p 121) and The Ultimate French Drop (p 123).

Andru


It is good to know that I was on the right path with this trick and that I was understanding things correctly.
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krolik

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Reply with quote  #9 
Yes, this makes perfect sense and makes me look at this old move in a different way. Nice touch!
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