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Wayne T

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Reply with quote  #1 
There had been some questions/comments concerning the use of fanning powder or talc to extend the life of cards.

Here is one interesting article from MoM. I realize they are pushing the fanning powder product but the fact that talc absorbs moisture may be a factor you should consider.

At $1.50 I just open a new deck when the one I am using gets gunked up with too much spaghetti sauce or Cheetos cheese grime.

I think Bob Farmer has an article on protecting cards which is good for extending the life of your favorite packet tricks.

 

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #2 
I used to do a manipulation act and did split fan card productions.  Fanning powder was a necessity.  Back then there were no "Japanese Wax" for card fanning, just powder.  Pure zinc stearate.  There were two kinds I used, the can that was an EZ-Magic brand and then the Delben Fanning Powder.  The Delben was noticeably finer and I believe, superior.

One thing is the method of application.  I invested in a wooden applicator and am glad that I did.  I don't think the one I have is made anymore.  Mine is lined with a velveteen material and has a "trough" on top and the cards are pushed through the powder and out the other side.  The powder goes on perfectly, very even.

I found this one, different, but similar to the one I have.

https://magicmethods.com/p/accessories/soo-zee-fanning-powder-applicator

I tried the ziplock bag application method but didn't like the results.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #3 
Does talc really work like fanning powder??

M
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Wayne T

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
Does talc really work like fanning powder??

M


I don't think so Mike. I read some other articles that the effect is somewhat temporary and when the talc absorbs moisture from your hands they stick again.

Be honest I never tried it, I jut break out a new pack.

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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
Does talc really work like fanning powder??

M

It never did for me. Even baby powder, which is supposed to be softer, was not as good as "official" fanning powder.

Like RayJ, I bought a dispenser years ago from Davenports. Mine was metal. I still have it somewhere. Labour intensive, as you expect, but it did the job.

I say "somewhere" because I haven't used fanning powder for a long long long time. Probably shortly after I powdered my first few packs.
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Dave Campbell

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Reply with quote  #6 
I use the powder recommended by Bob Farmer (powdered Teflon) -- and applying it is kind of a hassle -- he suggests using erasers and making a device to insert the cards through -- I'm saving that link you posted Ray -- that looks like the ticket.

I use it for after I've protectively coated packet tricks.

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne T


I don't think so Mike. I read some other articles that the effect is somewhat temporary and when the talc absorbs moisture from your hands they stick again.

Be honest I never tried it, I jut break out a new pack.


Wayne, I haven't used it in years myself.  I never used it to "rejuvenate" a deck, but to simply make the cards fan more easily and spread more consistently.  

The cards used for back-palming hit the floor sometimes and of course they pick up oils from the fingers, so they need to be cleaned and re-powdered at times.  I found the powder lasted a long time though.  Certainly didn't need to apply very often.

I'm with you.  When a deck gets too sticky I just retire it.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #8 
I"m pretty sure that talc will cause problems. Stick with fanning powder. It works very well.

I use the old "paper bag" method. You put a small amount of powder in a brown paper grocery type bag. Then spray the cards into the bag, seal it up and shake it. Probably best done outside. Reassemble the deck and riffle the cards while outside to blow off excess powder. Now faro a couple of times. They'll fan and spread beautifully.

Be careful not to get the powder in your eyes. I think that's the main health risk.

Mike
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Bob Farmer

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Reply with quote  #9 
Zinc S material is terrible for one reason: it attracts dirt and makes the cards a mess. A much better material is powdered Teflon which piano repairers use:

https://www.howardpianoindustries.com/micro-fine-ptfe-powder/

Do not breath this stuff in.


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Tom G

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Reply with quote  #10 
Wasn't there an applicator for fanning powder years ago? I'll have to look in some old catalogs.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #11 
One of the applicators was called Suzee. You pushed each card through the device and a bit of powder was placed on the card. I haven't tried Teflon powder yet. Not sure about safety issues. The non stick coatings are under the microscope for PFAs which seem to have health risks. 

A quick google search for safety of teflon powder seems to give it a good bill of health. It's inert but breaks down at temps above 400 degrees. I don't think shuffling cards should raise the temp to that value.

Mike
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom G
Wasn't there an applicator for fanning powder years ago? I'll have to look in some old catalogs.


Tom, I posted a link for an applicator in a post above.
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Tom G

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Reply with quote  #13 
That was it Soo Zee, surprised it's still being made.
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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #14 
The applicator is like the one Jack Hughes used to make decades ago, I had one as a kid. The same time I found out talcum powder was no substitute for fanning powder. πŸ˜‰


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Senor Fabuloso

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Reply with quote  #15 
Talc works just as good as so called fanning powder but like with many things in life, LESS IS MORE.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #16 
Maybe it's baby powder that doesn't work well. It has talc and corn starch. I'll have to try pure talc to compare. 

M
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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #17 
Talcum powder may have changed over time or differ slightly in different countries but certainly in the U.K. in the seventies talcum powder was no substitute for 'fanning powder'. just like hairspray was no substitute for roughing fluid.  If talcum powder works now, guess it would be cheaper.  Several times though, Bob Farmer has mentioned a newer alternative on this forum.
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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Hallas
The applicator is like the one Jack Hughes used to make decades ago, I had one as a kid. The same time I found out talcum powder was no substitute for fanning powder. πŸ˜‰



As mentioned I got mine from Davenports. it cost 3/6. That's three shillings and sixpence or seventeen and a half "new" pence.

It may well have been a Jack Hughes build.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Smithee

As mentioned I got mine from Davenports. it cost 3/6. That's three shillings and sixpence or seventeen and a half "new" pence.

It may well have been a Jack Hughes build.


I'll dig my applicator out and post a picture.  Mine is made out of wood and lined with what looks like red velveteen.  There is a recessed "trough" on one long side into which you sprinkle the powder.  The cards come out perfectly coated, not too much, not too little, so long as you keep the powder stocked on top.  It really doesn't take that long to do.

I'm pretty sure that I bought it as a package with some ZS powder and it was branded as being made by Delben.
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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #20 

The talc I tried up, over, down and across the years was not a suitable substitute. As for which brand of dealer powder I used, I have no idea. It was fanning powder. If it was plain talc that the dealer bought in from somewhere and then re-packaged I never saw any comment as to what it might be and where it came from.γ€€ 

In the UK talcum powder seems to be getting hard to find. I think it’s something to do with carcinogens or some other fragrant stuff that might be in the talc. And might not be. So talc versus fanning powder looks like being a moot point very soon.γ€€

 Or maybe both will become scarce. That will keep the price down.

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #21 
Here is the applicator I spoke of. The can of powder was sold for $1.50 when I bought it in the 70s. Look at the instructions on how to apply! Funny.

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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #22 
Neat. Bit tricky working out which way is up!!   [smile] [wink]
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #23 
I don't know why, but that happens when I attach photos from my iPad.  It doesn't happen when I do it from a PC.  Technology!
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Bob Farmer

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Reply with quote  #24 
Talc can have asbestos in it.
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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Farmer
Talc can have asbestos in it.


Could well be the reason it's getting less common in the UK, as I mentioned earlier.
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #26 
Don't young male magicians have enough self-esteem problems already?!

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