Sign up Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Bill Guinee

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 253
Reply with quote  #1 
Like many magicians, I am on the hunt for tricks that can be performed close-up and do NOT involve cards or coins. What are your favorite books for this kind of close-up magic? I would love some suggestions.
0
Harry Lorayne

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,343
Reply with quote  #2 

         MANY magicians are on the hunt for books with tricks that do NOT involve cards or coins! ? 
   
         Seriously?  I didn't realize that  at all. I sure have been wasting my time writing the wrong books - mostly close-up, impromptu, with cards. Like six decades of wasted time and effort!!    Live and learn.
0
Bill Guinee

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 253
Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne

         MANY magicians are on the hunt for books with tricks that do NOT involve cards or coins! ? 
   
         Seriously?  I didn't realize that  at all. I sure have been wasting my time writing the wrong books - mostly close-up, impromptu, with cards. Like six decades of wasted time and effort!!    Live and learn.


I absolutely did not say that there is anything wrong with card and coin books. I love them. There are lots and lots of them. If I never bought another card book, I would never run out of tricks to learn. Books that deal with other types of close up, are much more rare, and I am looking for recommendations. It hadn’t even occurred to me (perhaps I was being foolish) that anyone would take my post as an attack on Harry Lorayne.
0
Harry Lorayne

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,343
Reply with quote  #4 
       Okay, no problem. Thanks for explaining.  Hope you get the information you're looking for.
0
jim ferguson

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 298
Reply with quote  #5 
Hi Bill.

Do you use handkerchiefs at all ?

Ron Bauer has a booklet in his Private Studies series, on Charlie Miller's Left Handed Hank routine (it's number ten in the series). The booklet also includes a handling for the Handkerchief With Seven Corners.
The routine was a favourite of the late (and sadly missed) Paul Chosse.


Jim


0
Magic Harry

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 351
Reply with quote  #6 
Some of the books you want to look for are the different Encyclopedia of...books. Like, Silk Magic, Rope Tricks, Cigarettes,Complete Close Up Magic and most of the close up books have many tricks to offer besides cards and coin. There are paddle tricks, ring on/off rope or string, Jardine Ellis ring, thimbles, balls, sponge balls,paper money and on and on.
Books also include Magic for Dummies,Idiots Guide to Magic Tricks, Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic, The Magic Book by Harry Lorayne. There are more but these suggestions should keep you busy.
Magic Harry

__________________
Harry Damareck
0
arthur stead

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 998
Reply with quote  #7 
Also The Art of Close-Up Magic 2-volume set by Lewis Ganson.
__________________
http://www.arthurstead.com
0
Magic Harry

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 351
Reply with quote  #8 
Of course I agree with you Arthur, but like I said " we could go on and on " and "There are more".
Magic Harry

__________________
Harry Damareck
0
Bill Guinee

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 253
Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks for the replies. Jim I will definitely check out the Bauer booklet. Thanks for the recommendations Arthur. I love the Art of Close Up Magic Vol 1, and that is exactly the kind of book I was looking for. I don’t have volume 2; do you think it is as good as Volume 1? Magic Harry, I was very interested in your post as it seems to recommend a lot of what I consider beginners books, and ones that were a bit after my time. But, I may just be being arrogant about this. Perhaps I should check them out along with the early books I read: Sachs, Elliott, Tarbell, etc. I am a bit surprised that I didn’t get more responses concerning recent publications focused on these matters, but they may just not be in style.
0
RayJ

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,467
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Guinee
Thanks for the replies. Jim I will definitely check out the Bauer booklet. Thanks for the recommendations Arthur. I love the Art of Close Up Magic Vol 1, and that is exactly the kind of book I was looking for. I don’t have volume 2; do you think it is as good as Volume 1? Magic Harry, I was very interested in your post as it seems to recommend a lot of what I consider beginners books, and ones that were a bit after my time. But, I may just be being arrogant about this. Perhaps I should check them out along with the early books I read: Sachs, Elliott, Tarbell, etc. I am a bit surprised that I didn’t get more responses concerning recent publications focused on these matters, but they may just not be in style.


Bill, while I don't own any of their books, I think guys like David Acer and David Regal might have a decent assortment of non "card and coin" tricks.  Jay Sankey is probably another good one to check out.

It seems most books are either cards or coins or sometimes cards AND coins, but it seems difficult to find a modern-day, "general magic" book that isn't designed for beginners.

I don't know if you've followed any of Michael B's videos here, but he has several that use ordinary objects such as keys that are well worth your time.
0
GregB

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 98
Reply with quote  #11 
I'm not sure about books but a few of my favorite effects without cards or coins would be Double Cross (Sharpie), Crazy Man's Handcuffs (rubber bands), Drawn Again (drawing duplication from Danny Archer), and Sponge Balls.
0
Rick Franceschini

Member
Registered:
Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #12 
In no particular order, here are some sources you may find helpful:

Abbott's Encyclopedia of Rope Tricks - by Stewart James, I never fail to go back in there and find something wonderful.
The Art of Magic - by Hilliard and Downs, there are some great items toward the back that some modern day pros have in their repertoires.
The Tarbell Course (1 through 8) - by Tarbell, Lorayne, and Kaufman - filled with a life time of incredible material.  
Scarne's Magic Tricks is filled with stuff waiting to be re-imagined.

From Frank Garcia:  The Real Secrets of the Three Ball Routines, The Very Best of Cups and Balls, All in a Nut Shell, and The Encyclopedia of Spongeball Magic are all truly wonderful books.

The Encyclopedia of Rubber Band Tricks by Mishell and Hurwitz, The Rice Encyclopedia of Silk Magic, and 50 Tricks With a Thumb Tip by Christopher will all set you reading and mining for weeks, months.....

Bruce Elliot's The Phoenix Magazine (Jay Marshall's New Phoenix Magazine,) and Harry Lorayne's Apocalypse Magazine have many, oh so many non-card, non-coin items.  

See the works of Jay Sankey and Paul Harris.

Have fun!



0
lfentin

Member
Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #13 
There's always Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic.  A little of everything... 

0
Mind Phantom

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,393
Reply with quote  #14 
Nobody has mentioned Close-Up Illusions...a really great book.
__________________
Self Concept Is Destiny...
0
jeline

Member
Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #15 
Gardner's Encyclopedia of Impromptu Magic. Great stuff in there.
0
Gareth

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,016
Reply with quote  #16 
Hi Bill, if you can find it and can stump up the cash get Michael Weber's Life Savers. I traded mine couple of weeks ago but it is high quality non-card impromptu or improvisational material. Very sought after.
0
Alan Smithee

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 484
Reply with quote  #17 
Nobody's mentioned Karl Fulves yet. His Self-Working series is crammed with stuff. Cards and coins, of course, but also paper, ropes, handkerchieves, numbers and mental magic. All worth a look.
0
luvisi

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 132
Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth
Hi Bill, if you can find it and can stump up the cash get Michael Weber's Life Savers. I traded mine couple of weeks ago but it is high quality non-card impromptu or improvisational material. Very sought after.


I was at a panel discussion at PCAM 1991 where Michael Weber discussed the copyright notice in that book. At the time, he told us that the material in the book was only licensed for use in improvisational situations. Buying the book did not give us a license to perform the material in a paid performance or on television.

Although I am not a professional, if I am going to invest in mastering a trick, I want to be able to perform it for money if I choose, so I never bought the book.

Naturally, you will have to make your own decision, but keep the restrictions in mind.

Andru
0
Mbreggar

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 755
Reply with quote  #19 
Bill ... you may want to spring for the bound volumes of "Apocalypse". Yes, there is a lot of card and coin stuff in there, but there's also tons (literally) of magic using other items as well. Harry may know the exact number since he wrote and edited the colossal thing for 20 years ... but, I believe there are 17,425,865 tricks in the complete run. (And so many of the card and coin effects are so unique, you may fall in love all over again!


0
Harry Lorayne

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,343
Reply with quote  #20 

 You missed one - there are 17,425,866 items in the complete run! 
0
Mbreggar

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 755
Reply with quote  #21 
Yes. I see you’re right. That’s the one doing the Elmsley count with sliced bread, right?
0
John Cowne

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 386
Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne

 You missed one - there are 17,425,866 items in the complete run! 

That reminded me of a quote from a book I’ve just been reading, called ‘Never Eat Alone’: “The problem isn’t information overload, it’s filter failure.” I’m glad for books like Harry’s ‘Classic Collections’ that helps me know where to start. In fact, I’m such a slow learner it’s given me enough for one lifetime! I do browse outside the home paddock occasionally, but I know where to return for a good feed.
0
John Cowne

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 386
Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbreggar
Yes. I see you’re right. That’s the one doing the Elmsley count with sliced bread, right?

The trouble (or serendipity) with that one is that while you’re hiding the one buttered slice, they all end up buttered!
0
Mbreggar

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 755
Reply with quote  #24 
Try dipping the slices in evaporated milk in preparation for doing a Borden Count
0
Robert McGee

Member
Registered:
Posts: 63
Reply with quote  #25 
Steve Beam's The Trapdoor has a wide variety of effects. Complete run is available on his website.
Van
0
lfentin

Member
Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert McGee
Steve Team's The Trapdoor has a wide variety of effects. Complete run is available on his website.
Van



Steve Beam.  [smile]

Lou
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.