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Gareth

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Reply with quote  #1 
This weekend have spent a fun time at the Stardust Casino, courtesy of Mike Powers' book Tesseract. Our resident magician/poet/physicist/musician has created a charming story effect. For those of you that don't have Mike's book, well stop reading this post and do your self a favour, go get it, but first let's talk rhythmic story presentations.

Specifically I'm talking about story presentations that have a poetic, lyrical, rhythmical or musical presentation as Mike's 'A Night at the Stardust' has.

A distinction for this particular discussion I'm more interested in these story effects.

I would not include The Card shark and the Four gamblers or Sam the Bellhop as these have a more narrative form but I would include the grand-daddy of them all, the late great Johnny Thompson's The Gambler's Ballad (link below)

What are some of your favourites? 

Conjuring Archive gives me this list, 

https://www.conjuringarchive.com/list/category/1153

I have none of these in my library so I'm unsure which of these are of sufficiently metrical cadence to be included in this discussion.

I hope I've made myself clear.

These presentations take effort, time and a lot of practice (what effect of value doesn't?) but they offer something quite unique, namely an integration of vocal and manual timing. A wonderful marriage of the voice and the hands and whats more, a piece that allows you to connect to your audience almost from the outset. The very vehicle, if devised properly allows you to amaze, and entertain in a way that may well feel fresh compared to all the other card tricks out there.

Ofcourse this result is not a given. The tenets of clarity and interest still stand immutable but I thought study of these presentations would be interesting.

I note Mike's friend Bill Bishop came up with the poem as an alternative presentation for Mike's Blind Willie Aces.

As an alternative discussion has any one given a regular effect the poetic treatment? 

and ofcourse sit back and enjoy the master at work.

https://www.magicana.com/video/johnny-thompson-gamblers-ballad-0


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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #2 
Alex Elmsley has a routine in which he recites a humourous poem about a gambler.  As I recall it, the gambler (named something like "Steamboat Sam") is accused of cheating with extra cards because he keeps getting winning hands.  The only bit I remember is
                     Said Sam, still hoping to stay alive,
                     "I've just got one-two-three-four-five"
as you count the cards.

Norman Beck does a routine in which he recites a poem about a cowboy and a dancer in an old-west saloon.  I remember bits of the poem but not the magic.  It was funny and clever.  I'm pretty sure it was published in The Linking Ring a few years ago.

Shawn Farquhar's "Shape of My Heart" is choreographed to Sting's song of the same name, and the lyrics are crucial.  I guess it could be performed with the magician reciting the words - but it's such a signature piece for Shawn I hope nobody does that.

Last and very much least, I created a routine for my son's 10th birthday party (which doubled as a Hallowe'en party) that was a variation on the old "wolves and sheep" effect.  I recited a poem about Scooby Doo and Shaggy having an adventure in Egypt, pursued by a band of spooky Boris-Karloff-style mummies.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #3 
I have two examples.  The first one I witnessed live and I doubt it is recorded anywhere, but it was done by Chris Kenner, now Executive Producer for David Copperfield.  Chris and I are the same age and were both members of the IBM in St. Louis back in the 70s and 80s.  He performed a "flipstick" routine done to rhyming patter.  The patter was actually a poem about his sister and all I remember is it had something to do with her freckles.  But it was adorable and magical and the two things, poetry and magic definitely enhanced one-another.

The second is the Rub-a-Dub Dub rhyming cups and balls patter.  I used to do the routine but haven't in ages.  I still know most of the patter but would have to go back and refresh the moves.  The rhyme is delivered in a "staccato" fashion, the words matching up with various actions of the cups and balls.  If you haven't seen it, it is worth checking out.  It is not just for children, though they love it.  I always got a great reaction out of it no matter the age group.

Mike Skinner featured it on one of his videos I think but the routine itself goes way back.  I will try to do some quick research on it.

"Rub-a-Dub Dub, three men in three tubs went sailing out to sea.  In tub number 1, tub number 2 and also in tub number 3.  And so on.....
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #4 
While searching youtube I found this charming presentation.  The patter isn't "exactly" as I learned it, but close. 

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Sibex

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Reply with quote  #5 
This is one of my favourite adaptations. I think it's a brilliantly clever and orignal version of Beat the Devil.


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