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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello,

My son does an awesome back palm, but his hands are too small to hide the card.

He is interested in magic and has the discipline to learn sleights.

Which coin sleights do you recommend he starts with?  Any YouTube videos you recommend?

Thanks!
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #2 
    No - just my book (written JUST FOR HIM) - THE MAGIC BOOK.
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #3 
I'll second Harry's suggestion. If he's a reader, your son will get loads of use out of The Magic Book. Coins, cards, mentalism, math magic... Can't go wrong. I have given it as gifts to nephews who expressed interest in magic, and would again.

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Bmat

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Reply with quote  #4 
I will add to that, Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic.

I don't recommend any coin sleights, or any sleights for that matter.  Not because he is nine, but because I don't think it is a useful or efficient way to learn magic.  Find effects that he likes and have/help him learn those.  Learn the moves and get the parts that you need for the particular effect. 

Why waste a lot of time learning moves you may never need?  The other problem with learning just a sleight is that how do you get in and out of it in the context of an effect.  Life gets a lot more interesting and challenging when you start performing.  So many learn the sleights but never perform.  One should start with performing and move on from there. 

The only time I feel differently is if somebody simply does not want to perform.  There are those that just want to learn the sleight and a trick and move on.  That is all well and good.  But if performing is the end goal, (and if you want to be a magician it has to be your end goal)  then learn effects, learn routines.  And do whatever you must to learn and perform them. 

You cannot perform sleights.  Well you can but it would be pretty boring for the spectator.  
Magician....  did you see that?
Spectator...no
Magician...excellent, now did you see that?
 

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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #5 

     In the Foreword of THE MAGIC BOOK ----  " I want to save you the forty years I spent learning/practicing sleights I never used!"   Start reading the good stuff!

 

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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #6 
    This, by Barry Allen, may help:  

"Harry Lorayne - from the age of 14, the introduction to The Magic Book - basically set me up for life. Many more books from Harry followed. To this day, I adore magic books.....particularly the aptly named 'The Magic Book'. It is the written pages of a book where the REAL miracles STILL hide. Example - anyone that has Harry's (often maligned) book Trend Setters and performs 'The Equalizer' will know EXACTLY what I mean! So a million thanks Harry - you may not have taught me how to read BUT jeeeeezus, you certainly taught me why I NEEDED to!"
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ParaSailor

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Reply with quote  #7 
I agree with Bmat in principle; rather than focusing on the details of learning slights, introduce him to the big picture: entertainment.  Allow him to pick out the illusions that interest him the most (why teach a mentalist to do coin magic or vice versa) and then learn just what is needed to do those tricks. Like Mr. Lorayne pointed out, start with the good stuff.
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Gareth

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Reply with quote  #8 
If he’s anything like my kids when they were 9 all they could think about was soon being 10! So what ever trick you do, I’d be sure to call it, “The 10 year old’s magic trick.”🤓

Come to think of it, that ain’t a bad gag if you pull up a child volunteer from the audience, ask them their name and age and use the same ruse, “This is the (age plus 1) year old’s magic trick, but Nathan you’ll be fine. I reckon.”
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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks, Harry!

I read The Magic Book.

Awesome!

And for those who say to focus on illusions that interest you and the sleights will follow, I understand your point, but it seems to me there are several foundational techniques that most (if not everyone) should master.

A few years ago when I was interested in learning card magic, before I was familiar with Harry Lorayne's books,  I stumbled across this quote....

"Quite frankly, I believe that if you can do a good card control, one good palm, and one good double lift, you can do miracles for laymen" - Harry Lorayne

That quote was instrumental in beginning to learn card magic, because I had no idea where to begin.  The amount of options are overwhelming and it was a great place for me to start.

Anyway, thanks for everyone's input!  We decided on learning the French Drop and we're off to a great start.

-Buffalo
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #10 
Often derided, the French Drop is a wonderful sleight. If you get ahold of a copy of Gary Ouellet's Close-Up Illusions, he dedicates an entire section on refinements to the sleight that elevate it from beginner level to way beyond. There's also a recent download dedicated to the move that got great reviews... unfortunately I cannot regurgitate the name. If it comes to me, I will post it here.

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Blathermist

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Reply with quote  #11 

As others have noted, learning sleights for the sake of it is not a waste of time, if that’s what you want to do. If it brings an inner glow, great. Just remember to apply the same dedication to the move(s) in the tricks you’re learning.

When it comes to coin magic, the coin roll is neither use nor ornament, but it’s fun to learn and looks good. So why not learn it? Most folk don’t make much use of the one-handed shuffle, but likewise it’s fun to learn and looks good.

Time wasted? I don’t’ think so.

These two links might be of interest. One concerns cards, but the thoughts and comments are universal. The second one centres around the French Drop.

French Drop 

http://www.themagiciansforum.com/post/the-french-drop-8381160?highlight=learning+sleights 

 

How Many Sleights  

http://www.themagiciansforum.com/post/how-many-sleights-should-you-learn-8131648?highlight=learning+sleights

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Blathermist

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Reply with quote  #12 

My own longtime favourite coin trick is Coin Thru Handkerchief. I can’t remember where I first came across it, but it wasn’t here.

Whisper it soft, but the the whole trick is explained. I suggest you get the book. 

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Scarnes-Magic-Tricks-John-Scarne-ebook/dp/B005HJUN4W/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1551810190&sr=8-2&keywords=scarne%27s+magic+tricks#reader_B005HJUN4W

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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blathermist

My own longtime favourite coin trick is Coin Thru Handkerchief.



Great trick. I use the Expansion of Texture version, as described in BoBo, a lot.

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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #14 
The expansion of texture is a lovely trick that's rarely seen these days. The audible clink of the coin arriving in the handkerchief can be quite a moment for the spectator.

Coin through handkerchief is also very nice, and by combining moves from both tricks you can have a nice three coins through hanky routine.
Some time ago I came up with a torn and restored paper napkin effect which was a combination of the standard coin through hanky, and torn and restored napkin using a tt. In this case the coin was used as a convincer that the napkin was actually torn (coin wrapped in napkin, napkin torn and coin removed, and napkin restored).

The dynamic coins prop is also suitable for beginners, and is a neat little trick.


Jim


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luvisi

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Reply with quote  #15 
The circus card trick

Paul Rossini's double-reverse

that spelling trick where you show them that the selection is still in the deck and then spell to it

You do as I do

Start with a reversed spot card near the bottom of the deck, such as a 7 with six cards at below it. Do a key card placement, reveal the reversed card, and then countdown 7 cards to the selection.

Andru
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #16 
Just to take a slightly different angle on this - if someone really wants to learn fundamental sleight of hand skills in the context of strongly magical routines, I recommend Bill Tarr's "Now You See It ..."  Is it suitable for a nine-year-old?  Impossible to say without knowing the individual. 
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Steven Youell

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buffalo McKinley
Any YouTube videos you recommend?

I would suggest you do not get him in the habit of learning from YouTube.
It could lead to some very, very bad magic.

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Steven Youell

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvisi
Paul Rossini's double-reverse

If I recall correctly, that's the third trick in Scarne On Card Tricks-- another great book for beginners.

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Steven Youell

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Reply with quote  #19 
Here's a write up of Rosini's Double Reverse I did for beginners. Complete with photographs.

 
Attached Files
pdf A Trick for Beginners.pdf (74.61 KB, 14 views)


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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #20 
That's excellent Steve - thanks for sharing. It is greatly appreciated.

Robin
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #21 
Cool! Thanks for sharing!

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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #22 
Thanks everyone for the great advice!
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HexTheDoombunny

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony Vinson
Often derided, the French Drop is a wonderful sleight. If you get ahold of a copy of Gary Ouellet's Close-Up Illusions, he dedicates an entire section on refinements to the sleight that elevate it from beginner level to way beyond. There's also a recent download dedicated to the move that got great reviews... unfortunately I cannot regurgitate the name. If it comes to me, I will post it here.

Av 


That's Trésor by Jeff Copeland. Worth every cent and the coins that come with the purchase handled like a dream. It's a truly great investment. Every aspect of the French drop is covered in great detail and his variations of the move come very close to looking like "real magic."
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