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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello,

Some of you know that my 10 year old son and I have been learning sleight of hand.

I believe many of you started magic when you were young.

How do I prepare my son for showing classmates the magic tricks he has learned?

I'm anticipating that he needs to expect that they'll blurt out they're theories about how the trick was done, as well as try to grab cards or gimmicks out of his hand when he's not expecting it.

Thanks,

Buffalo
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #2 
First, classmates can be some of the worst audiences as I'm sure you know. Many will get mad because they are in reality jealous. I would tell him to only perform things he is really confident in. You only get one chance to make a good impression. He should also not repeat the same trick in front of the same kids. They will be more apt to figure out the method or at least have a clue and probably won't be shy about telling him.

I remember having pretty good reactions when I was in school but I confined my performances to a small group of friends, mainly during lunch. They were supportive.
If he is lucky maybe there is another kid interested in magic and they can forge a relationship over it.

Good luck!
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #3 
Just thought about some other things.  First, if he is doing a trick for a small group, they might be literally surrounding him.  If the trick needs to have them in front because of angle sensitivity, he needs to know how to encourage them to move.  Typically, you want to look at them and say, "come around to the front so you have a better view".  He wants to maximize his potential for success.

I hope he just relaxes and has fun.  In life you need to develop a thick skin and situations like those he will encounter offer opportunities to learn how to do it.  Also, I would encourage him to not take any expensive props to school.  I lost some silver coins in school.  Someone figured out a way to get into my locker.  So leave the pricey stuff at home.
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #4 
I endorse and agree with Ray's final paragraph above. Teach him to relax and have fun with his magic. It's all about fun and involvement and bringing smiles and light hearts to those who are interested. Not easy lessons to impart, I know. Much of it has to do with you. What's your approach? What does he see when he watches you perform?  

Also, start him off with easy stuff. Really easy stuff. Simply exploiting glimpses and forces yield tens of thousands of possibilities. 

Lastly, the kid is fortunate to have a father who cares about and encourages his passion. He may not understand that right now, but in the future it's going to be a huge part of who he becomes. Thanks for taking the time to raise your son!

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony Vinson
I endorse and agree with Ray's final paragraph above. Teach him to relax and have fun with his magic. It's all about fun and involvement and bringing smiles and light hearts to those who are interested. Not easy lessons to impart, I know. Much of it has to do with you. What's your approach? What does he see when he watches you perform?  

Also, start him off with easy stuff. Really easy stuff. Simply exploiting glimpses and forces yield tens of thousands of possibilities. 

Lastly, the kid is fortunate to have a father who cares about and encourages his passion. He may not understand that right now, but in the future it's going to be a huge part of who he becomes. Thanks for taking the time to raise your son!

Av 


Amen to caring and raising!
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Waterman

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Reply with quote  #6 
I agree with Anthony in that regardless of our children's pursuits, support and encouragement is the cornerstone to their success.

My magic mentor was my father ...until he re-married a woman who felt his time should be focused mainly on her instead of his three children. I was the same age as Buffalos son and remember trying to make sense of, "Our Magic" , "Magic Without Apparatus", and "Sleight of Hand"...all excellent books in their own right in preparing a magician for real world performances. Having my father hang out with me and read the pages back to explain what I wasn't understanding was no longer an option. I drifted away from magic...sports...and most of the other interests that were once part of the father son relationship I lost to my stepmother.

As it has a tendency to do in all of our lives, fate eventually led me to a person who would rekindle my passion for magic. It was on my paper route one day that a customer happened to mention to me that her son was a magician. He had recently graduated from college and was back living at home for a few months before moving overseas. I told her about my interest in magic and the next day her son greeted me at the door. At that time he was the best magician I had ever seen. He was doing the sleights I was reading about, but thought impossible due to the descriptions in the books. For the next few months he took time from his schedule to get me back on the path of becoming a magician. 

Looking back now I realize that the good feeling I had meeting with him wasn't due to me leaning magic, but knowing that someone cared. Needless to say I was soon performing for friends, relatives (with the exception of my stepmother), and teachers whenever the opportunity presented itself. 

Like Anthony said, thanks for taking the time to raise your son.
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jim ferguson

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waterman
I agree with Anthony in that regardless of our children's pursuits, support and encouragement is the cornerstone to their success.

My magic mentor was my father ...until he re-married a woman who felt his time should be focused mainly on her instead of his three children. I was the same age as Buffalos son and remember trying to make sense of, "Our Magic" , "Magic Without Apparatus", and "Sleight of Hand"...all excellent books in their own right in preparing a magician for real world performances. Having my father hang out with me and read the pages back to explain what I wasn't understanding was no longer an option. I drifted away from magic...sports...and most of the other interests that were once part of the father son relationship I lost to my stepmother.

As it has a tendency to do in all of our lives, fate eventually led me to a person who would rekindle my passion for magic. It was on my paper route one day that a customer happened to mention to me that her son was a magician. He had recently graduated from college and was back living at home for a few months before moving overseas. I told her about my interest in magic and the next day her son greeted me at the door. At that time he was the best magician I had ever seen. He was doing the sleights I was reading about, but thought impossible due to the descriptions in the books. For the next few months he took time from his schedule to get me back on the path of becoming a magician. 

Looking back now I realize that the good feeling I had meeting with him wasn't due to me leaning magic, but knowing that someone cared. Needless to say I was soon performing for friends, relatives (with the exception of my stepmother), and teachers whenever the opportunity presented itself. 

Like Anthony said, thanks for taking the time to raise your son.



Admittedly, that brought a tear to my eye.


Jim

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waterman
I agree with Anthony in that regardless of our children's pursuits, support and encouragement is the cornerstone to their success.

My magic mentor was my father ...until he re-married a woman who felt his time should be focused mainly on her instead of his three children. I was the same age as Buffalos son and remember trying to make sense of, "Our Magic" , "Magic Without Apparatus", and "Sleight of Hand"...all excellent books in their own right in preparing a magician for real world performances. Having my father hang out with me and read the pages back to explain what I wasn't understanding was no longer an option. I drifted away from magic...sports...and most of the other interests that were once part of the father son relationship I lost to my stepmother.

As it has a tendency to do in all of our lives, fate eventually led me to a person who would rekindle my passion for magic. It was on my paper route one day that a customer happened to mention to me that her son was a magician. He had recently graduated from college and was back living at home for a few months before moving overseas. I told her about my interest in magic and the next day her son greeted me at the door. At that time he was the best magician I had ever seen. He was doing the sleights I was reading about, but thought impossible due to the descriptions in the books. For the next few months he took time from his schedule to get me back on the path of becoming a magician. 


Looking back now I realize that the good feeling I had meeting with him wasn't due to me leaning magic, but knowing that someone cared. Needless to say I was soon performing for friends, relatives (with the exception of my stepmother), and teachers whenever the opportunity presented itself. 

Like Anthony said, thanks for taking the time to raise your son.



Waterman, thanks for sharing that story.  I can relate to parts of it.  Different situations but not so dissimilar in many respects.

Glad for your sake and for ours that you found your way home!
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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks Ray and Anthony for the great advice, as usual!  I passed it along to my son.  The two of you really set a great example on this forum.

Waterman, glad you found someone to inspire your interest in magic again.  Since things didn't go as you would have preferred with your dad, I'm sure you learned from that experience and inspire many others.  I'm reading former Navy SEAL David Goggins' book, "Can't Hurt Me".  He had a terrible dad and found the strength to turn his life around in an incredible way and inspire many others.

Everyone should read his book.


https://www.amazon.com/Cant-Hurt-Me-Master-Your/dp/1544512287


-Buffalo
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DJ

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buffalo McKinley
I'm reading former Navy SEAL David Goggins' book, "Can't Hurt Me"
-Buffalo


Finished this book not too long ago.  It's crazy the things he has done!

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Senor Fabuloso

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Reply with quote  #11 
Even though I started young at 8 years old, I never performed for children until much latter in life. For many of the reasons already mentioned but also because I had no interest in my classmates. Part of the thrill was knowing things ADULTS didn't know. I also got to the street by 13 and was making so much money, the only kids I could have hung out with that were at my economic level, would have been the drug dealing kids. It wasn't until latter that they to, got my interest and wouldn't be an appropriate group, to want to impress as a young person.

So to answer the op, I wouldn't prepare my child to work for his classmates. I'd prepare him for life. instilling maturity, responsibility and confidence, in everything he did and does.

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MagicTK

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Reply with quote  #12 
All the stuff these guys already said is golden!

A few years ago, my daughter wanted to perform The Shoelace Knot for her 2nd grade class (I think she was 7 at the time).  I had told her she needs to practice it a lot.  Start off with 10 times.  Then do 10 more, and keep adding more times.  Then once she has practiced it 100 times... do it another 100.  I told her that some of the moves I know, I've practiced 1000's of times before I ever attempted to show anyone.  Some do come much easier.  However, I was trying to be sure she had the patter down with the moves.  She would practice it many times, then come and perform it for me.  I would critique, then have her practice again.   I'm not sure if she truly did 100's of times, but when she was confident enough that's when she asked her teacher if she can perform it for them.  She did just fine.  Although, I am not sure the kids asked a bunch of questions or not.  I will check with her.

She's going into 5th grade now.  Interests kind of changing, but still has the bug.  So we'll see.  Now to work on my 6yr old son.

Tom
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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Senor Fabuloso
I also got to the street by 13 and was making so much money, the only kids I could have hung out with that were at my economic level, would have been the drug dealing kids.


Thanks, Senor!

How were you making so much money performing magic at 13 years old?

-Buffalo
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Senor Fabuloso

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Reply with quote  #14 
Doing street magic. AKA Busking.
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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Senor Fabuloso
Doing street magic. AKA Busking.



I don't understand. Can you elaborate?  You would ask for money or people would give you money after you performed a trick?

Thanks,

Buffalo
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