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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello!

I was given as a gift Roberto Giobbi's "Card Magic Masterclass".

I started watching the first DVD on controls and it was a little overwhelming, and I have to admit that I was a little bored.

He goes over a LOT.

I understand he is incredibly respected (and deservedly so) and I'm not undermining that in the least.

I'm trying to find the best approach to getting the most value from watching the five DVDs.

Should I be learning and practicing every technique he mentions?  Or should I only learn the techniques that I need for tricks I'm interested in?  Or is there a middle ground?

When magicians seem to know many, many different sleight-of-hand techniques, I can't help but wonder how many of them they actually use on a regular basis and should learning many, many techniques be an objective for myself?  I want to make the most of the time I have to practice.

Thanks!

-Buffalo
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Harry Lorayne

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       When you finish with those, which are excellent, check out my 4-volume "Best Ever" DVD set. I'd be interested in seeing in which you learn more. 
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Harry Lorayne

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   When I say "learn more" I mean sleight/ideas, etc., you'll USE.   From the Foreword of one of my books:  "I want to save you the forty years I wasted learning sle9hts I never used."
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #4 
Buffalo,

It is a masterclass, so at this point it might be a bit beyond your skillset or interest. That doesn't mean that you won't find it immediately useful, but odds are it's something that will prove more valuable as you progress in card magic. Yes, he goes into great detail, but it's those small details that can make all the difference. Giobbi is an excellent teacher; patient, pedantic, and engaging. Browse the content for anything of current interest, and then revisit each disc as you gain knowledge and experience. It's a great course, it really is, so hang in there, but don't feel that it's something you need to digest all at once. Use it as a reference.


Harry's correct: you need not learn every sleight in the book to be a competent card magician. There's another active thread about sleights at the moment, and the general consensus is that - and I paraphrase Pall Hallas here - the sleight toolbox need not be too large.

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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne


       When you finish with those, which are excellent, check out my 4-volume "Best Ever" DVD set. I'd be interested in seeing in which you learn more. 



Sounds good!

I may purchase Jaw Droppers first, though.  Any recommendations on which volume to start with?

Thanks,

Buffalo
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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony Vinson
Buffalo,

It is a masterclass, so at this point it might be a bit beyond your skillset or interest. That doesn't mean that you won't find it immediately useful, but odds are it's something that will prove more valuable as you progress in card magic. Yes, he goes into great detail, but it's those small details that can make all the difference. Giobbi is an excellent teacher; patient, pedantic, and engaging. Browse the content for anything of current interest, and then revisit each disc as you gain knowledge and experience. It's a great course, it really is, so hang in there, but don't feel that it's something you need to digest all at once. Use it as a reference.


Harry's correct: you need not learn every sleight in the book to be a competent card magician. There's another active thread about sleights at the moment, and the general consensus is that - and I paraphrase Pall Hallas here - the sleight toolbox need not be too large.

Av 



Thanks for the advice!

Very helpful.

-Buffalo
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Harry Lorayne

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    Sorry, no choice for JAW DROPPERS.  Vol. 1 has been sold out for a long time. JAW DROPPERS TWO is heading in that direction. So, if you really want one, suggest you order it from me ASAP. You can PayPal payment directly to my personal email address (harrylorayne@earthlink.net ). Any questions, Buffalo, feel free to email me at that address. 
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Bill Guinee

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Reply with quote  #8 
I really like this set of DVDs. Personally, I think it is really useful to watch through them all, though there is no hurry in doing so. Watching them all will give you a sense of the philosophy, how Giobbi approaches the moves, which ones work best in which situations, how to get into and out of them, and so forth. Then, after this initial viewing, I use these lessons as reference material. For example, if I want to force a card in a particular trick, I might review the various options that Giobbi presents, and then choose to focus on the one that seems most useful in the circumstances of that particular trick. I then focus on learning that particular move.

However, personally, I have some disagreement with the prevailing wisdom that you don't really need to learn very many sleights. At a practical level, this is certainly true. With a half dozen well-chosen sleights you have access to hundreds (thousands?) of good tricks. If you then practice these sleights endlessly, until they are near perfect, you can astonish almost any lay audience.  Following this logic, however, you should also stop learning new tricks - surely you already have plenty to provide a killer practical repertoire.

However, I am working on magic at two levels. First, I would like some really good sets of effects that can really work well and be used practically and effectively. This is fundamental. However, I also have a second goal. I would like to be a first rate card magician. This goal reaches way beyond being able to do a couple of good sets of material. This second goal emphasizes endless learning. 

I have recently discovered something really interesting to me. I have found that by learning what are for me difficult sleights (faro, pinky count, spread culling, diagonal palm shift, one-handed top palm, etc.), I seem to advance to a new level. With each difficult sleight that I acquire, the next ones seem to get easier. It is as if my hands are learning how to learn. My wife and I usually watch a few hours of television each evening - often an hour-long news show and then a movie. I practice card sleights throughout the entire viewing. That means that I have approximately 3 hours of practicing sleight of hand every day. And without much pain involved.

And the great thing about it is that when I am learning a new trick, I can look at the sleights and decide if I would rather replace them with something different (using something like the Giobbi DVDs). And then, I can have confidence, that I will be able to learn these new sleights and that I will be able to do so without too much difficulty. This gives me the feeling that I have an enormous potential tool kit, and this conception really frees me up for deciding how best to approach an effect.

As always, I apologize for the lengthy response.
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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #9 
Bill,

Thanks for taking the time to write all your thoughts down!

Very helpful.

-Buffalo
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Dave Campbell

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Reply with quote  #10 
Buffalo...

Even Card College kind of pulls you in that direction... I find things like that I have to take in small chunks -- I can't read/listen all the way through a bunch of that without having something to use it on or it just slips out of memory.

I'm the same way with software stuff (what I do) -- it's just the way I learn -- have to be using it to remember it.

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Buffalo McKinley

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Campbell
Buffalo...

Even Card College kind of pulls you in that direction... I find things like that I have to take in small chunks -- I can't read/listen all the way through a bunch of that without having something to use it on or it just slips out of memory.

I'm the same way with software stuff (what I do) -- it's just the way I learn -- have to be using it to remember it.




Agreed.

Thanks!

-Buffalo
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Mbreggar

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Reply with quote  #12 
I’m a huge fan of Giobbi... but if you think honestly about what material you wish to excel at, you’ll find the need for numerous sleights to be minimal.
Harry, in one of your early VIDEOTAPES I seem to recall you mentioning mastering the jog shuffle and a false cut or two, a palm, a double lift and a couple of forces — regardless of which ones you’ve learned — and that’s all you need to perform a large percentage of card magic.
In fact Giobbi himself says something similar in his first Penguin lecture. And in the preface of his Card College series he states going though the sleights and tricks in the first two volumes (which were always supposed to be a single volume) will provide you with the knowledge and skills that a large percentage of magicians!

I’d strongly suggest you start with Harry’s “The Magic Book” — the chapter on card sleights. Learn the sleights and the tricks (which you’ll see in other Harry books — yes, they’re that strong). Revisit these slights in their respective sections on Giobbi’s master class DVDs. Then go back to Harry’s Best Ever box set. Watch the performances and learn the choreography from Harry, but head back to The Magic Book if you need to review the specific sleights. Sometimes the explanations move too fast on video, but you control your learning speed in a book.

One more note about Giobbi’s Masterclass set. In my mind the essays before he jumps into the sleights details are more valuable than anything else on the videos. Also, Roberto is pretty accessible on his website.

And we all know Mr Lorayne is right here to help us and guide us to “the good stuff”!!!!
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TomV

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Reply with quote  #13 
i cant comment on the dvd but to your general question the longer I practice magic the more important keeping it simple becomes. I'm more interested in learning tricks that appeal to me so outside of basic card handling which seem universal like control shuffles and cuts, the double lift, stuff like that that i use constantly I don't practice any sleights unless they are part of a specific effect I want to do.


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Paco Nagata

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Reply with quote  #14 
Whit some good presentation, showmanship and misdirection (and lots of practise) you can be the best IMPROMPTU card magician in the world through just the following techniques:

- The Double Lift/Turn Over
- The Break
- The Key Card
- The Corner Crimp
- The Glide
- Braue Addition
- Depth Illusion or TILT
- The Spread Cull
- Vernon's Multiple Card Control
- Top Palming and Side Steal
- The Top Change
- The Classic and Herrmann Pass
- Some False Shuffles/Controls
- Some False Cuts
- Some Forces
- Some False Counts as:
1- Ascanio Spread
2- Buckle Count
3- Flushtration Count
4- Hamman Count
5- Elmsley Count
6- Jordan Count
7- Biddle Move
- Some Colour Changes

Of course you can learn more, but only to do different things; not to be particularly a better card magician.

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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #15 
     
    Pay attention:

             
    "I’d strongly suggest you start with Harry’s “The Magic Book” — the chapter on card sleights. Learn the sleights and the tricks (which you’ll see in other Harry books — yes, they’re that strong). ... Then go back to Harry’s Best Ever DVD set. Watch the performances and learn the choreography from Harry, but head back to The Magic Book if you need to review the specific sleights. Sometimes the explanations move too fast on video, but you control your learning speed in a book." 
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