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Socrates

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Which books have you found most influential in your magic development. Mine have been: The Magic Book by Harry Lorayne Magic & Showmanship by Henning Nelms Magic by Misdirection by Dariel Fitzkee Leading with your Head by Gary Kurtz Mastering the Art of Magic by Eugene Burger Psychological Subtleties by Banacheck I've often said that reading just Harry's 'Magic Book' and 'Magic & Showmanship' has been enough to allow me to create magic that'll keep me going for the rest of my life. I stand by that. Obviously I have read other books, but those above have been extremely influential. One of the best things I ever did was contact tons of professional Magicians by email when the internet first came about. I asked them a series of questions in order to guide me further on the correct path. Their knowledge and advice was invaluable, it has stuck with me.
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mark lewis

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Oh, you had better not start me off about "Magic and Showmanship" by Henning Nelms!
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Ha ha, I know you love the book Mark... I've heard your thoughts on it many times, I call it the Marmite book. I know a lot of people take everything Nelms says on board, but it's like everything else - you gotta separate the wheat from the chaff.

Besides the Nelms book. Which ones have influenced you?
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Michaelblue

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Leading With Your Head by Gary Kurtz--Lot's of good stuff about misdirection.

Williamson's Wonders

Carneycopia

Close Up Card Magic
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #5 

Obviously I am tempted to say that all Harry Lorayne's books have influenced me but I know he doesn't want me to "publicise" it.

The Royal Road to Card Magic has been a huge influence on me as has the presentation section of Expert Card Technique.

There are really too many books to name and they have all influenced me in some way or other. But let me try to list the important ones. Oh this is really difficult........

The Bobo book on coins

Many of the Lewis Ganson books, particularly the ones on Vernon and Slydini. In fact any book on Slydini come to think of it.

Ormond Mc'Gills books on stage hypnotism

Anything by Richard Webster on psychic work.

The Thirteen Steps to Mentalism by Corinda. I knew the author and in fact worked for  him at one point.


But there really too many to name from Stars of Magic to Greater Magic. I love the Paul Le Paul book too and use a lot of material in it.

I suppose in recent years I have been influenced heavily by the DVDS and the book on Paul Potassy. I saw him work when I was much younger and was enthralled by him. And never heard a word about him until decades later when his material came out. I suppose he is my most recent influence. I use his sympathetic silks routine a lot now. I was surprised at how difficult a trick it was with a move every second but I mastered it in the end.

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jim ferguson

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"The Magic of Michael Ammar" was one of the books that really made me take a look at my magic and delivery. A couple of the essays touched upon aspects I had been pondering before I purchased the book, and helped crystalise certain thoughts I'd had.

To an extent "Pure Effect" has influenced my approach to mental type effects, although I only do a few such pieces.


Jim



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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #7 
  No, no, Mark - I sure don't mind you publicizing your remark - "...I am tempted to say that all Harry Lorayne's books have influenced me." Publicize it as often as you like.
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Great replies so far.

Pure effect by Derren had some interesting ideas for me, the Ammar book too. I seem to gravitate towards the essays/philosophy, theory more than the tricks. The sleights, tricks are great but the principles behind them interest me more. That way I can mix and match and begin to create my own routines and effects.

Other books -

Scarne on Card tricks
The complete Jinx by Annemann et al.
Chan Canasta by David Britland
The Commercial Magic of JC Wagner by Mike Maxwell
Personal Collection by Harry Lorayne
Combo 1 & 2 by Karl Fulves
The Cardician by Marlo

Estimation booklet by Marlo
Hideo Kato's book on Estimation
Bold & Illogical Card Moves by Justin Higham... I also enjoyed his books on improvisation.

All the books have been great, but the real gold is the performing. I try and jazz something somewhere everyday. All the paid gigs have been great, but it's the magic I love the most, where I do it doesn't really matter to me.


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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #9 
Bobo's, yes, I'd like to add that to my list
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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark lewis

Obviously I am tempted to say that all Harry Lorayne's books have influenced me but I know he doesn't want me to "publicise" it.

The Royal Road to Card Magic has been a huge influence on me as has the presentation section of Expert Card Technique.

There are really too many books to name and they have all influenced me in some way or other. But let me try to list the important ones. Oh this is really difficult........

The Bobo book on coins

Many of the Lewis Ganson books, particularly the ones on Vernon and Slydini. In fact any book on Slydini come to think of it.

Ormond Mc'Gills books on stage hypnotism

Anything by Richard Webster on psychic work.

The Thirteen Steps to Mentalism by Corinda. I knew the author and in fact worked for  him at one point.


But there really too many to name from Stars of Magic to Greater Magic. I love the Paul Le Paul book too and use a lot of material in it.

I suppose in recent years I have been influenced heavily by the DVDS and the book on Paul Potassy. I saw him work when I was much younger and was enthralled by him. And never heard a word about him until decades later when his material came out. I suppose he is my most recent influence. I use his sympathetic silks routine a lot now. I was surprised at how difficult a trick it was with a move every second but I mastered it in the end.



Bobo on coins is a good book, I'm no coin worker by any stretch of the imagination but I have played around with coins quite a bit. This book gave me some great ideas. Harry's 'Magic Book' gave me a more concise guide to the coin sleights, the retention vanish pinch vanish etc have all come in handy.

I used the false transfers for bills, and billets, and any small items. The bobo-switch is great too.

Richard Webster's work I am familiar with. I ordered a bunch of great material off of him years ago, and he is great to communicate with. I combined some of his ideas with the card work I do, great stuff.

Read Corinda, he has a great section on cold-reading which I really enjoyed.

Never really got on with Royal Road, although I do use the first trick... Think it's called the topsy turvy trick... from time to time. Expert card technique was good, I picked up a great deal of odds and ends from within its pages.

The encyclopaedia of card tricks by Hugard has some wonderful effects and ideas in it, still flick through that on occasion.

The Ormond McGill book I liked was 'Real Mental Magic', nothing groundbreaking but it got me thinking.

Not read a great deal of Slydini, but I enjoyed the section from 'Stars of Magic'... His performance style is a bit too 'Catch me if you can' for my liking, but you can't argue with his thoughts on misdirection.. He weaves a wonderful net to capture your attention.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts Mark, always interesting to hear what people are inspired by.
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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michaelblue
Leading With Your Head by Gary Kurtz--Lot's of good stuff about misdirection.

Williamson's Wonders

Carneycopia

Close Up Card Magic


'Leading with your Head' is a winner, such a small booklet... but packed full of practical examples, advice and wisdom. Every magician should read it!

'Close-up card Magic', wow... Out of this Universe!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne
  No, no, Mark - I sure don't mind you publicizing your remark - "...I am tempted to say that all Harry Lorayne's books have influenced me." Publicize it as often as you like.


What about yourself Harry, do you have any favourites?
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #13 
Of course he does. His OWN books! Just kidding, Harry! I can be tongue in cheek too! Actually I would be quite interested in the answer to this question too. And also if there were any magicians you particularly admired and looked up to. After all, you must have met a LOT of magicians in your time!
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #14 
     Dai Vernon, John Scarne, Bill Simon, Ed Balducci, Francis Carlyle, Bruce Elliott, Dick Cardini, Dick Himber, Tony Slydini, Jay Ose, and so on, were all personal friends.
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Craig Logan

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Reply with quote  #15 
As a mental wizard (read into that what you will) I would say my list of influential books is a little boring. The standards have been my guide through my journey into mentalism. 

13 Steps - Corinda    This book has a special place in my heart as it was gifted to me by a very kind magician while we were in a magic shop. I had mentioned that I was beginning my journey into mentalism (I had a used copy of Practical Mental Effects in my hand) and he asked me if I owned 13 Steps. I said it was on my wishlist as I'd heard it was a foundational text. He had the book in his hand and bought it. He turned and handed it to me. He told me to pay it forward and buy a magic book for a kid when I see one at a magic shop. I've read it cover to cover, and it has truly proven to be one of the most important books on my path. 

Practical Mental Effects - Annemann   See above story.

Strong Magic - Darwin Ortiz   Packed with advice on making both you and your magic "strong." 



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Reply with quote  #16 
Not so many books required for you then Harry. Unlike you, the books are the closest we can get to those guys, that's why we are so lucky to have you on here.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mediocre_magic
As a mental wizard (read into that what you will) I would say my list of influential books is a little boring. The standards have been my guide through my journey into mentalism. 

13 Steps - Corinda    This book has a special place in my heart as it was gifted to me by a very kind magician while we were in a magic shop. I had mentioned that I was beginning my journey into mentalism (I had a used copy of Practical Mental Effects in my hand) and he asked me if I owned 13 Steps. I said it was on my wishlist as I'd heard it was a foundational text. He had the book in his hand and bought it. He turned and handed it to me. He told me to pay it forward and buy a magic book for a kid when I see one at a magic shop. I've read it cover to cover, and it has truly proven to be one of the most important books on my path. 

Practical Mental Effects - Annemann   See above story.

Strong Magic - Darwin Ortiz   Packed with advice on making both you and your magic "strong." 




Annemann & Corinda will set you up for life. The Darwin Ortiz book is good too. Your story about being gifted the Corinda book is cool, I'm intrigued to know if you've paid it forward yet, and if so what book did you gift?
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Reply with quote  #18 
"How To Be a Perfect Liar: The Complete Alibi Handbook" by Mort Weisinger and Arthur Henley - I picked this up at a bookstore's discount bin when I was 9 years old. I believe it was reduced to $1.98.  It gave me a strong base on how to BS.

"The Amateur Magician's Handbook" by Henry Hay - my very first magic book. I saw it on the racks at a 5 and 10. Read it in the racks. Got to false transfers and wound up stealing the book. So it started me in magic and a small-term life of crime.

"Now You See It, Now You Don't" by Bill Tarr - before the influx of videos, the flowing line drawings in this book were a godsend in learning how to do sleight of hand. I still use some effects out of this book.

"Capricornian Tales" by Christian Chelman - my baptism into the world of bizarre magick.

"Magic and Meaning" by Eugene Burger and Bob Neale - gave me a different way to look at and approach my magic.

"JawDroppers!" - by Harry Lorayne - a fresh approach (for me) to card magic.



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Lifeoftheqc

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Reply with quote  #19 
Got to add Expert at the Card Table.    Come on boys!  LoL.
As a side note, a lot of people have tried to discover who Erdnase was.  Years ago, and I believe I'm not the first, I did some research at the San Francisco public library with a good 
friend of mine, David Micheal Evans, and we came up with a guy named E Andrews who lived around the same time.  He was a gambler and a womanizer, and he died after a card game when somebody hit him in the head with a mallet and smashed his skull.  I was convinced at the time that was the man, and I forget all of the reasons now.  It was about 30 years ago that I did the research.
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damianjennings

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Reply with quote  #20 
Amateur Magician's Handbook
Royal Road
Ganson's Vernon books
Stars of Magic

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luigimar

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Speaking of David Michael Evans, I met him once about 28 years ago. I went to a Magic Shop (Merlin's Magic Mansion) I would go to every week in Belmont California (I think) and he was there. I don't know if he was there to deliver some books or just visiting but the thing is they had just received the brand new (then) The Classic Magic of Larry Jennings. I saw it and bought it immediately. I was introduced to David by Merlin, the store's owner and I was told that he had been involved in the production of the book. He had written the research/credits section of the book, which is at the back and it has his initials at the end of the section. So I asked David to sign my copy of the book where his initials are and I still have that book and treasure it as it was the first book ever that I had signed by anyone involved in writing a book. Later David did some amazing card magic for me and I still remember that day. Lifeoftheqc if you still see David, please say hello to him from me. I don't think he remembers that day though... lol... I have some pictures of David doing some magic that day.



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Craig Logan

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Socrates
 Annemann & Corinda will set you up for life. The Darwin Ortiz book is good too. Your story about being gifted Corinda is cool, I'm intrigued to know if you've paid it forward yet, and if so what book did you gift?


I'm still waiting to meet the young wizard, but I can tell you, if he or she is interested in mentalism, it will be 13 Steps. I've been in a magic shop twice since then and there weren't any young magi either time. Maybe I'll just mail someone deserving of a copy. Let me know if you have anyone in mind. 

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Reply with quote  #23 
In no particular order:

General magic: Greater Magic and The Tarbell Course in Magic (the hard bound 8 volume set), The Amateur Magician's Handbook by Barrows Mussey (Henry Hay)

Cards: Everything Harry Lorayne has ever written, Card Manipulations and More Card Manipulations by Jean Hugard, The Royal Road to Card Magic, The Card Magic of Nick Trost, the Stewart James volumes

Coins: David Roth's Expert Coin Magic, J.B. Bobo's New Modern Coin Magic

Mentalism: Practical Mental Magic by Theo. Annemann, 13 Steps to Mentalism by Corinda, Mind, Myth, and Magic by T.A. Waters


I love this thread. In The Jinx, Annemann would write about the Six Foot Book Shelf, a.k.a. THE essential books a magician should have on a six foot shelf. I think it would be fun to recreate such an idea here. [smile]
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rready

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Reply with quote  #24 
When I first started it was mostly Nick Trost who had some pamphlets written  on card magic. Impromptu card magic, Subtle card magic Part 1 and 2, Ace tricks, Mental card miracles, Gambling tricks with cards part 1 and 2. It was these that really sparked my interest. Alex Elmsley and Harry, of course. Later on John Bannon, Simon Aronson and the great Lewis Jones. I picked up all of Lewis' books(except the new one he just published) in the past year or so and love his originality and thinking. He wrote them back in the day but for some reason I never heard of him.

Also loved Scarne on cards, small softcover packed with many great tricks. I would say the was the first, thinking back to my younger days.
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the fritz

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Reply with quote  #25 
I would say definitely The Magic Book. That is probably number one for me. That one, along with a book called Pure Magic by Henry Gross. Those two were my first REAL magic books and the ones that started me off. I checked them out of the library so many times, then with used book seller's on the web, I was able to finally to have my own personal copies.

Royal Road is up there as are Eugene Burger's books. I heard someone say one time, that Eugene just writes the same book over and over. I sort of agree, but I really like that one book, so I guess I like them all!

Probably my favorite "just cards" book is Scarne on Card Tricks... so many plots and ideas. Just add a little simple sleight of hand to most of them and you have a book filled with stuff you will use forever.

I also really love CUCM.
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Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EVILDAN
"How To Be a Perfect Liar: The Complete Alibi Handbook" by Mort Weisinger and Arthur Henley - I picked this up at a bookstore's discount bin when I was 9 years old. I believe it was reduced to $1.98.  It gave me a strong base on how to BS.

"The Amateur Magician's Handbook" by Henry Hay - my very first magic book. I saw it on the racks at a 5 and 10. Read it in the racks. Got to false transfers and wound up stealing the book. So it started me in magic and a small-term life of crime.

"Now You See It, Now You Don't" by Bill Tarr - before the influx of videos, the flowing line drawings in this book were a godsend in learning how to do sleight of hand. I still use some effects out of this book.

"Capricornian Tales" by Christian Chelman - my baptism into the world of bizarre magick.

"Magic and Meaning" by Eugene Burger and Bob Neale - gave me a different way to look at and approach my magic.

"JawDroppers!" - by Harry Lorayne - a fresh approach (for me) to card magic.





'Magic and Meaning' is a book I really enjoyed... Took me further down the path of contemplating the 'Magic' of Magic. The Henry Hay book was interesting too, I picked up a few ideas from within its pages.

The book on lying you mention sounds useful, I've always considered it a worthwhile pursuit to study the psychology of deception. It is useful both in Magic and outside of it. Shows how easily mislead we can be.
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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rready
When I first started it was mostly Nick Trost who had some pamphlets written  on card magic. Impromptu card magic, Subtle card magic Part 1 and 2, Ace tricks, Mental card miracles, Gambling tricks with cards part 1 and 2. It was these that really sparked my interest. Alex Elmsley and Harry, of course. Later on John Bannon, Simon Aronson and the great Lewis Jones. I picked up all of Lewis' books(except the new one he just published) in the past year or so and love his originality and thinking. He wrote them back in the day but for some reason I never heard of him.

Also loved Scarne on cards, small softcover packed with many great tricks. I would say the was the first, thinking back to my younger days.


Subtlety is a great study. Nick Trost, John Bannon etc are great for this. John Bannon likes the old books of Rufus Steele, these books are well worth investigating. Lewis Jones has also read them, he is a clever creator, plus he's a great guy and great to share ideas with.
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MorrisCH

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Reply with quote  #28 
The books that influence the way I am had never been a card books or a coin books
although the books such as Royal Road and Modern coin Magic has offer a range of material to study, I don't see these book that teach me trick has ever influence the way I structure my routine, act and performance
Theory, however, change the way I think about magic

Strong magic - my first ever theory books, every times I flip the pages I can always find something new
Magic of Ascanio Vol.1 through Vol.3 - without Ascanio, there will be no Strong magic and many years of theory books to come, his way of thinking has enormous impact on my card magic in general, I consider him as my mentor
The Magic Way - this books brings attention to the rarely discuses issue, the extensive analyze of the tricks makes me aware of the key point whenever I come across the new tricks I want to perform
Designing Miracle - same as the reason above but looking form different perspective, Darwin's thinking makes me revisit my repertoire again and again.
Card College - with the knowledge pass on from Ascanio, this series doesn't just teach you trick and sleight, it tackle on the important subject of misdirection when performing card magic, tension-relaxation, head movement, and many more
Magic of Slydini - everyone should read his book, period.
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Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MorrisCH
The books that influence the way I am had never been a card books or a coin books
although the books such as Royal Road and Modern coin Magic has offer a range of material to study, I don't see these book that teach me trick has ever influence the way I structure my routine, act and performance
Theory, however, change the way I think about magic

Strong magic - my first ever theory books, every times I flip the pages I can always find something new
Magic of Ascanio Vol.1 through Vol.3 - without Ascanio, there will be no Strong magic and many years of theory books to come, his way of thinking has enormous impact on my card magic in general, I consider him as my mentor
The Magic Way - this books brings attention to the rarely discuses issue, the extensive analyze of the tricks makes me aware of the key point whenever I come across the new tricks I want to perform
Designing Miracle - same as the reason above but looking form different perspective, Darwin's thinking makes me revisit my repertoire again and again.
Card College - with the knowledge pass on from Ascanio, this series doesn't just teach you trick and sleight, it tackle on the important subject of misdirection when performing card magic, tension-relaxation, head movement, and many more />Magic of Slydini - everyone should read his book, period.


Great book choices there MorrisCH, and a very important point made. Juan Tamariz's, Darwin Ortz, Ascanio etc. get us thinking about what we are doing with our magic and how people percieve it.

An excellent set of books chosen.
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Mr. Danny

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Reply with quote  #30 
The Amateur Magicians Handbook, was what got me into magic.
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #31 
  Hey, c'mon, at least me or my books got, I think, two mentions - that's more than most!!
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Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne
  Hey, c'mon, at least me or my books got, I think, two mentions - that's more than most!!


Harry, you wrote the 'Magic Book' which is chock-a-block, and jam-packed with absolute gems. As you say in the beginning, you save the reader years of wasted effort and I know that to be fact. I for one am still learning from re-reading it... in fact I'm studying it, which is a novel concept these days. Darwin Ortiz advised reading your books, and learning everything in them. Denny Haney said the following about Harry:

"Some of the greatest card tricks ever are done without even touching the deck. Just take a look at “Stop” or “Lazy Man’s Card Trick.” Both of these effects can be found in Harry Lorayne’s Close Up Card Magic book. This was Harry’s first book and I still consider it to be the best one he ever wrote. Then again, that’s an “old” book so the younger magicians ignore it for the most part."

Study these books and you'll be rewarded. Harry has written so many of them, but you only need one and you can work for the rest of your life without exhausting the material within its pages. Along with the Magic Book, I've got: Close-up Card Magic' Personal Collection Lecture Notes from 1980 That's more than enough to last a lifetime.

Years ago I had the lecture he did at 'International Magic' on video too. And that's not even counting the memory and mind power books.

"We are born unarmed, our mind is our only weapon" - Ayn Rand
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #33 
     Boy, do you have a long way to go - there's Reputation-Makers, Deck-Sterity, Rim Shots, Afterthoughts, Trend Setters, Star Quality, Best of Friends volumes 1, 2, 3, Classic Collection volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Special Effects, Jaw Droppers! - to name a few.
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #34 
      Since you're quoting me quoting Ayn Rand I assume you've read one of my books on memory. Oh, and don't "forget" The Magic Book, Mathematical Wizardry, Before I Forget, etc. (Thanks for the plug opportunity!)
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Reply with quote  #35 
Plug away Harry.

I'll add once again, all Harry's books are great.

I have read nearly every one you've written, but decided only to keep the ones I mentioned in my previous post above. As I said one of them will keep anybody going for a lifetime.
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Charlie

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Reply with quote  #36 
I would say harry lorayne and paul harris were the two most influential writers on me because my focus was/is card magic. Michael Ammar to a lesser degree.  Bobo's modern coin magic was my coin bible. I did lots of Tarbell stage stuff at one point.

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Reply with quote  #37 
The trick books got me started, the psychology/philosophy ones got me thinking.

These days I no longer need new books. If anything I'll return to Card College to learn some new sleights/concepts, but I haven't used a single trick from those books. It's more fun to get creative and create my own stuff.

One thing I do from time to time is head over to the Denis Behr conjuring archive, and read through the effects to stimulate my imagination.

And the added bonus, it saves me a ton of money and storage space.
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Reply with quote  #38 
    Okay, Socrates, you told me to "plug away" so I will --- I'm betting that you'd find new effects/routines to do in JAW DROPPERS! I really am willing to lay odds on that.
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wbausert

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Reply with quote  #39 
The early books for me as a kid:
• Magic With Cards (Garcia & Shindler)
• Amateur Magician's Handbook (Hay)
• Bill Severin's Big Book of Magic
• Now You See It, Now You Don't (Tarr)

As an adult, beginning in 1989:
• Close Up Card Magic (Lorayne) HUGE impact on me
• Modern Coin Magic (Bobo)
• Stars of Magic
• Dai Vernon Book of Magic (Ganson)
• Expert Card Technique (Hugard & Braue)
• The Magical World of Slydini (Fulves)
• The Best of Slydini...and More (Fulves)
• David Roth's Expert Coin Magic (Kaufman)
• Secrets & Mysteries for the Close up Performer (Burger)
• Bob King's Lecture Notes (Magician Foolers and 1 other I can't recall at the moment)
• Audience Pleasers (Mark Nathan Sicher's lecture notes)
• Terry Guyatt's Lecture Notes (can't recall the name)

I'd be remiss if I didn't acknowledge the recent huge influence of Marlo on me, but not from any of his books. I hope to soon invest in Revolutionary Card Texhnique and Cardially Yours, but until now it was Bill Malone's DVDs that opened my eyes to Marlo.

I'm sure I will kick myself for missing a few important titles when I next look at my magic library, but this is it for now. Great topic!

All the best,
Warren Bausert
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #40 
      There are some things I never will understand. Like, for instance, for example, etc. ---- Warren, you say that at about 1989 my book Close-Up Card Magic had a HUGE impact on you. Then you list about a dozen other books, and a couple of DVDs, over a period of time I assume, but --- not another of any books, or DVDs, from the person (ME) who had that HUGE impact on you. THAT'S what I can't understand. Because - since that first book of mine I've written quite a few more JUST FOR YOU. I just don't understand (no large problem - the older I get the less I understand).
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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #41 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wbausert
The early books for me as a kid: • Magic With Cards (Garcia & Shindler) • Amateur Magician's Handbook (Hay) • Bill Severin's Big Book of Magic • Now You See It, Now You Don't (Tarr) As an adult, beginning in 1989: • Close Up Card Magic (Lorayne) HUGE impact on me • Modern Coin Magic (Bobo) • Stars of Magic • Dai Vernon Book of Magic (Ganson) • Expert Card Technique (Hugard & Braue) • The Magical World of Slydini (Fulves) • The Best of Slydini...and More (Fulves) • David Roth's Expert Coin Magic (Kaufman) • Secrets & Mysteries for the Close up Performer (Burger) • Bob King's Lecture Notes (Magician Foolers and 1 other I can't recall at the moment) • Audience Pleasers (Mark Nathan Sicher's lecture notes) • Terry Guyatt's Lecture Notes (can't recall the name) I'd be remiss if I didn't acknowledge the recent huge influence of Marlo on me, but not from any of his books. I hope to soon invest in Revolutionary Card Texhnique and Cardially Yours, but until now it was Bill Malone's DVDs that opened my eyes to Marlo. I'm sure I will kick myself for missing a few important titles when I next look at my magic library, but this is it for now. Great topic! All the best, Warren Bausert


I love that Harry's books are at the top of almost everyone's list. Including yours, Warren.

Thanks for sharing your favorites with us. 

I've never heard of Terry Guyatt. I'll have to look him up.

By the way...welcome to the Magician's Forum!

Rudy

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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #42 
I remember Terry Guyatt! A good close up magician from London. He is probably no longer with us since it was a very long time ago. I  remember Tony Corinda giving him some advice or other when he visited the Magic Department in Hamleys that Tony owned. And I vaguely remember that there is a contribution from Terry in the 13 Steps to Mentalism.
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #43 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne
      There are some things I never will understand. Like, for instance, for example, etc. ---- Warren, you say that at about 1989 my book Close-Up Card Magic had a HUGE impact on you. Then you list about a dozen other books, and a couple of DVDs, over a period of time I assume, but --- not another of any books, or DVDs, from the person (ME) who had that HUGE impact on you. THAT'S what I can't understand. Because - since that first book of mine I've written quite a few more JUST FOR YOU. I just don't understand (no large problem - the older I get the less I understand).

 

I have ten of the books on Warren's list! I hope I am not in trouble too! Mind you, I might be OK since I have these of yours too.

Close up Card Magic

My Favourite Card Tricks

Personal Secrets

Decksterity

Reputation Makers

The Magic Book

Tarbell 7

I have to confess that I actually have two others that I have never even looked at. The Epitome Location and the Derek Dingle book you wrote.

Still you will probably forgive me when I tell you that I have your non magic books such as

Before I Forget

Mind Power (I think that is the title)

How to Develop a Super Power Memory

The Memory Book

Mathematical Wizardry (And may God and Harry forgive me I haven't looked at this one either!)

And three other of your memory books and ironically I have forgotten the titles!

One was ONLY on remembering names and faces, one was an unusual format with squares or something you had to fill in and I can't remember what the other memory book was about. Or even if I still have it. I expect I do.

You once mentioned to me that you had written around 80 books or so. Still that list above should be enough for now. I hope you don't mind if I look at some other books in the meantime. Some of them are also quite good you know!

 

 

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damianjennings

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Reply with quote  #44 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark lewis
I remember Terry Guyatt! A good close up magician from London. He is probably no longer with us since it was a very long time ago. I


Terry is alive and well. Saw him a couple of weeks ago at the circle. 
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wbausert

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Reply with quote  #45 
Terry did a terrific lecture years ago for us at Ring 244 on Long Island, and he completely fried me at the diner later that night with something he wouldn't tip. I can't even remember the routine, but it was one of those moments that stand out in my magical life. Boy would I like to meet him again.
Warren Bausert
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wbausert

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Reply with quote  #46 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Lorayne
      There are some things I never will understand. Like, for instance, for example, etc. ---- Warren, you say that at about 1989 my book Close-Up Card Magic had a HUGE impact on you. Then you list about a dozen other books, and a couple of DVDs, over a period of time I assume, but --- not another of any books, or DVDs, from the person (ME) who had that HUGE impact on you. THAT'S what I can't understand. Because - since that first book of mine I've written quite a few more JUST FOR YOU. I just don't understand (no large problem - the older I get the less I understand).
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wbausert

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Reply with quote  #47 
Hi Harry,
I have many others of your books, including Personal Secrets, Decksterity, Rim Shots, My Favorite Card Tricks, Reputation Makers and Tarbell 7...it's just that, for me, Close Up Card Magic towers above all the others. You'll notice that in a previous post, I included Halo Aces in my list of "go to" things to do, Which I learned from an early VHS you did. I also have two DVDs from your four dvd set, The Memory Book, and have all of your linking ring parades on my book shelf in the Harry Lorayne section. (That's correct, there's a Lorayne section of my magic library!). Come to think of it, I also have Vol 1 of Apocalypse. You have put out so much material that I still have a lifetime of it to go through!

Incidentally, another worthy conversation can be devoted to Most Influential VHS/DVDs, because I consider it a completely different category than books, even though many DVDs are based on books (ex. Slight of Dave & Dave 2 from Williamsson's Wonders).

Still another worthy topic would be Most Influential Lectures, either in person, or on video a la David Roth Live in Philadelphia, Vernon in Japan, Penguin Live and At The Table.

Harry -- Have any of your lectures been recorded and released?

All the best,
Warren Bausert
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #48 
         No, don't think so. I know some were done in Europe, but not released - I don't think. Decades ago, one European lecture host did try to "release it" but I stopped it. After that, I never allowed cameras when I lectured. Who knows? Maybe that was a mistake. HL.
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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #49 
International Magic had a 3hr lecture of Harry's. I used to own it on VHS tape. It was the first place I saw 'Numero Uno' perfomed, you can find that effect in Harry's 1980 Lecture notes if you wish to learn it.

Try getting hold of International Magic in London, they may have a DVD copy of his lecture available.
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Deckster

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Reply with quote  #50 
Great and hard question, so many books.

Books! Timeless, no matter the material.  If it's dated or you don't like the effects you can learn from that too. I learned from so many, but among favorites and influential are:

All of Lorayne's! Really, I mean it.

Vernon, Slydini, Tarbell, Fitzkee, Ortiz,

I think Strong Magic and Designing Miracles are vital and instrumental philosophical books that help me strengthen my magic incredibly. They have given me the tools to analyze any effect and improve it. While the others influence my thinking and material greatly, these books are game changers for performance.

Aronson., Hugard, Erdnase, Fulves, Stanyon, Buckley, Marlo, Garcia, Schindler, Nelson, Mentzner, Elliot, Annemann, Harris, Tamariz..........

So many books, so little time.  I acknowledge that many of the books we love are composed of many different magicians contributions within them. We haven't been talking magazines but the Apocalypse "books" contain more material than I can go through in a lifetime. Harry has been a master at presenting other magician's work along with his own with his thoughts and afterthoughts and there's really nobody else who has contributed so many peoples work, so well and for so long.  If I only get one book on the island?  hmmmm, it'd probably be a Lorayne.

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