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RayJ

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From the web, no kidding:

John Nevil Maskelyne

English magician and inventor of the pay toilet


So I guess he figured out a way to make a business out of doing your business![biggrin]
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Intensely Magic

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ
From the web, no kidding:

John Nevil Maskelyne

English magician and inventor of the pay toilet


So I guess he figured out a way to make a business out of doing your business![biggrin]


Makes sense. Gave him.a place to set up without being disturbed.

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Paul Hallas

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Yeah, I think I'd come across that before. When it caught on he was flushed with success!
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RayJ

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Hallas
Yeah, I think I'd come across that before. When it caught on he was flushed with success!


Nailed it!
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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When I saw the term "pay toilet" I immediately thought about the old WKRP episode where Herb Tarlick tried to get under the door of one dressed as a fish.
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RayJ

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamtheNotsoMagnificent
When I saw the term "pay toilet" I immediately thought about the old WKRP episode where Herb Tarlick tried to get under the door of one dressed as a fish.


I absolutely loved that show.  I was a Venus Flytrap fan.  My favorite scene was when they played After the Love is Gone by Earth Wind & Fire.  Awesomesauce.

Regarding "going under", when I was a kid, White Castle restaurants in St. Louis had pay toilets.  They had several stalls, all were unisex (they were ahead of their time!).

There was a round knob on the front and you had to insert a dime.  Sometimes you wold see desperate or drunk folk slithering under the door.  They left it high enough so that you could see people's feet I guess so they couldn't hide out in there.

[806940482_11fz]
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RayJ

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Sorry but this thread is quickly going down the drain.  For our Australian friends, is it true water circles the opposite way "down under"?

[postcard-chicago-arcade-card-century-of-progress-cartoon-about-pay-toilets-1934]
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ


I absolutely loved that show.  I was a Venus Flytrap fan.  My favorite scene was when they played After the Love is Gone by Earth Wind & Fire.  Awesomesauce.

Regarding "going under", when I was a kid, White Castle restaurants in St. Louis had pay toilets.  They had several stalls, all were unisex (they were ahead of their time!).

There was a round knob on the front and you had to insert a dime.  Sometimes you wold see desperate or drunk folk slithering under the door.  They left it high enough so that you could see people's feet I guess so they couldn't hide out in there.

[806940482_11fz]


Poison Palace Belly Bombers, I remember them well! This has nothing to with magic unless you count making a bag of  $.15 cent sliders disappear.

The thanksgiving episode is a television classic. "As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly."

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RayJ

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We called White Castle the "Porcelain Palace" due to the construction consisting of porcelain-coated steel panels.  They all pretty much resembled each other.
Here is a bit of history on them for those that don't have a clue as to what we are talking about.  Personally I love them.  Krystal in the south is similar but they serve them with mustard already on them.  Castles have onion only.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Castle_(restaurant)
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MagikDon

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[love] White Castles..........I remember when the used to be 12 cents each and could get a dozen for a buck. "Whities", as my wife calls them, have a cult following. Some love them, some hate them. Whenever I go back east to see relatives, they know to have a sack on hand. Before they were readily available in the grocery stores, a local church used to have a truckload shipped annually to Albuquerque for us hard core addicts (as a fund raiser). But.....we are getting off the point.


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Alan Smithee

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If memory serves Maskelyne also came up with the "ticket dispensing" machine used in cinemas. Or at least a version of it.
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RayJ

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Smithee
If memory serves Maskelyne also came up with the "ticket dispensing" machine used in cinemas. Or at least a version of it.


I seem to remember stories of other magicians inventing. Robert -Houdin, for example.

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krolik

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I waffle between being impressed and mad at the guy.
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Robin Dawes

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ


I seem to remember stories of other magicians inventing. Robert -Houdin, for example.



My favourite Robert-Houdin invention was his thief-catcher.  Installed in a desk-drawer, if anyone opened the drawer without disabling the trap an arm tipped with many needles would spring out and permanently tattoo "VOLEUR" on their hand!


I'm not sure his invention was ever put into use, but it was the great-grandparent of those little joke boxes where a snake lunges out when you pull back the lid.
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RayJ

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Dawes


My favourite Robert-Houdin invention was his thief-catcher.  Installed in a desk-drawer, if anyone opened the drawer without disabling the trap an arm tipped with many needles would spring out and permanently tattoo "VOLEUR" on their hand!


I'm not sure his invention was ever put into use, but it was the great-grandparent of those little joke boxes where a snake lunges out when you pull back the lid.


Very cool!  I had not heard that one.  Reminds me of the attache case James Bond had in From Russia With Love where you had to turn the clasps a certain way before opening or else it would blow up.

I love gadgets.
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