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Ryan Swigert

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Reply with quote  #1 
I just picked-up a new set of coins. Was wondering if any of you have a routine or procedure that you do to new coins to make them “soft”.

Thought I would ask here before I start going after my coins with steel wool and sandpaper. Haha.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan Swigert
I just picked-up a new set of coins. Was wondering if any of you have a routine or procedure that you do to new coins to make them “soft”.

Thought I would ask here before I start going after my coins with steel wool and sandpaper. Haha.


Ryan, I wouldn't intentionally do that to coins.  I don't know what "set" you have, but if it is just a number of silver coins you can find all kinds of "soft" silver halves and dollars at coin shops that are naturally worn.  

Many shops call them culls or bulk silver and they sell them by the ounce.  Sometimes they sell them for X times face value, so a silver half dollar might be 10X Face or $5.00.

Steel wool will take the tarnish off and leave you with a shiny coin.  Sandpaper, unless very fine is too aggressive and you are likely to make deep scratches.  

Some of the coin producers like Schoolcraft will offer coins in soft condition or in almost uncirculated condition, your choice.  That is important if you are buying a set with a matching shell and/or re-edged, etc.

Some folks have a hard time finding coins but I never have.  Maybe some towns don't have coin shops anymore, but St. Louis is loaded with them.  They buy and sell silver all the time and have buckets full.  Literally.
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Ryan Swigert

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Ray!

Yep, I've purchased soft coins from those buckets at Coin Shops in the past.  The thing I'm currently facing is a set of coins that are "like new", and I would like to doctor them in some fashion to make them "soft" (i.e. Barely any noise when rubbed across each other) and look worn in.
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RayJ

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan Swigert
Thanks Ray!

Yep, I've purchased soft coins from those buckets at Coin Shops in the past.  The thing I'm currently facing is a set of coins that are "like new", and I would like to doctor them in some fashion to make them "soft" (i.e. Barely any noise when rubbed across each other) and look worn in.


What, specifically are the subject coins?
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RayJ

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Cannot personally vouch for the efficacy of this treatment, but here is a video tutorial.....

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RayJ

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If using sandpaper, try finer grits first.  You can always get more aggressive, but if you start too rough, you've ruined the coin.
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Tom Kracker

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Try heating them up to 1,763°F.  They will become much softer.

One thing I used to do was carry coins around in my pocket every day.  However, I think only a few years of that doesn't match decades of wear and tear.

I think most coins naturally become softer and smoother mostly from rubbing against other coins and being in pockets.  So, you could maybe try setting up a jig like with a sander (without sand paper) that has a small shape (bracket or something) to hold the coin fixed in place, then allow that coin to vibrate on another coin, that is also fixed in place, for some amount of time.  I would have no idea how long this would take, but now you got me thinking...  I might try this some time, just out of curiosity.

Do you have a picture of the coins you are planning to use?  or what type of coins are they?

Tom

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Anthony Vinson

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Okay, just throwing this out. It may be impractical, but what about those old rock polishers or tumblers? I used to see those things advertised a lot as a kid. The idea was to put rocks for polishing in with some grit of some sort and turn it on to tumble. Sounds reasonable to me. But then again so do a lot of things!

Av
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Tom Kracker

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Reply with quote  #9 
AV,

I was actually going to suggest that same thing, but then I thought it might wear the edges more than the faces.  However, I don't have a rock tumbler, so I can't even try.

Tom

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markd2990

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ
Cannot personally vouch for the efficacy of this treatment, but here is a video tutorial.....



Good tutorial vid . . . worth watching . . . gold in this vid.

Thx for posting RayJ
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #11 
Glad you found some value in it.
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Ryan Swigert

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Reply with quote  #12 
Agreed! That video is the best one I've seen for making coins soft. Thanks so much for sharing Ray!
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #13 
Happy to help!
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