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Rick Holcombe

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Reply with quote  #1 
If you have the time and patience I'd love for you to take a look at my revised handling of a Copper Silver Brass routine I recently posted.

I considered a lot of peoples' useful advice and reconfigured some things. No arms crossing and a much more interesting ending.

Thanks,
Rick

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David

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Reply with quote  #2 
Yeah that does look cleaner. I havent watched them side by side yet, but I will because thats the kinda thing I do at night. I really like how you got rid of the coins at the end. Steven Youell uses the term elegant solutions. If I understand it  correctly that means knowing what you want the result to be then figure out how to get there. I find that popping up in my head a lot when Im working on things.

Edit- I should have said effect instead of result. Anyway that just came to mind as I know you like to create original material and I know Ive spent about a week and a half trying different ways to accomplish one certain effect.
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Tom G

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Reply with quote  #3 
Definitely like this version better. The original had some confusing moments.
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Rick Holcombe

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Reply with quote  #4 
I appreciate you guys watching again.

This is the main goal for me putting up ideas for people to see. Your comments and advice have forced me to take a hard look at something that was just OK and turn it into something way better.

And David, if you don't mind, I'd love to brainstorm on your idea. What exactly are you working on?
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Waterman

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Reply with quote  #5 
Rick... Although I only do two coin routines (one I perform for lay-folks and the other mostly for magicians) I really do love good coin magic. The work that you're putting into your routine is impressive.

It's inspiring to see people put the time into coin work as it can sometimes feel that the only magic we talk about is done with a deck of cards!!!

Hope to see more of your stuff soon...even if it uses a deck of cards [wink].

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Stevie Ray Christian

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Reply with quote  #6 
There's a lot to like here Rick. I appreciate your demos and hope to see more routines from you as TMF coin magic topics continue to grow.

Here are a couple of thoughts and ideas:

The premise that the coins are confounding you is fine but it may not be constant with other routines in your act--or your persona. Cardini committed to a character consistently befuddled by his revelations. His plight was made even more amusing by his aristocratic costuming and manner. You may want to consider the notion that the coins are mischievous by relating their behavior to a story... say, a coin collector who was overcome by fumes from metal polish or a rare coin dealer with a terrible memory. In other words, the hi-jinx are anecdotal and the coins are under your control.

I like Gregory Wilson's approach to coin work: plant your feet and keep your actions crisp and natural. So much of what you do in the vid follows this credo. That said, here's my nit-picking (which can be blamed entirely on Greg)...

1) The way you reveal the coin at 00:38 is very magician-y but not natural. So much coin magic is taught and performed with flowery moves... but you seem like a manly man who would open his hand sharply. Also, hold the pose for a beat to let the magic sink in. I feel most of your revelations will benefit from that extra beat. Your spectators will appreciate that "Wait.. what?" moment and the bizarre transpositions will be clearer and more memorable. With spectator reactions and pauses for display, you'll get this bit up to three minutes and it will still seem rapid-fire.

2) Magicians blow!... Why? Once upon a time, somewhere, someone blew on their hand, something vanished and everyone followed. For years, I was as guilty (and apparently as full of magic hot air) as the next guy. "All I have to do is blow..." became the new abracadabra! While there've been plenty of Saturday mornings where I could have dissolved solid metal with my breath, I'm inclined to say magic blowing sucks. It doesn't enhance the effect and it has become a cliche. Instead, a beat of silence and a stern gaze will create a fine moment of tension; this will also focus your spectator's attention exactly where you want it to be.

3) The venerable coin purse is an odd little thing. Cardini's cartoonish fop might've carried one, but the tiny container seems so anachronistic and... feminine. Worse yet, the spectators will suspect that Barbie's handbag is doing the magic for you. Many masters built classic moves and routines around this prop but... laymen don't care. A small pay envelope might lack elegance but it will possess more mystery. It can be sealed shut, torn open to reveal the final miracle and left behind as a conversation piece.

These observations are nit-picky and not meant to be issued as gospel. Based on those beautiful instruments in the background, I'll wager you know how different a well-rehearsed piece can feel on the bandstand... AND how inspiring a good audience can be. Get out and show this routine to laypeople. Do let the revelations sink in. Try to find an environment where you can perform for a few different groups of strangers in one night. Afterward, take note of your experiences, the reactions, what worked and what you might alter. Be sure to write your observations down and revisit your notes at your next practice session. 

 
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Rick Holcombe

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks Dan, glad you liked it. I do love cards, but I feel I'm just an average card handler.  I have a solid repertoire of classics, but I find it more challenging to create original stuff with cards.  I do have a handful of original creations though.

And thanks Stevie. Wow...
You gave me a ton of good advice here. I appreciate how much thought you put into your response here and in my Presto Chango routine too.  
I agree with point number 1. I don't usually flourish my fingers that way, it just kind of happened in the moment.
With point number 2, I can't really elaborate, but it helps facilitate the move. Maybe I'll just kiss the coin hahaha
And point number 3, I actually hate saying the word "purse", but nobody has ever mentioned it or made fun of it.  I don't know... I think when they see these old coins inside, the special purse maybe makes sense? But, it's absolutely crucial to the handling of this routine; an envelope just wouldn't substitute here.

Thanks again for making time to watch and comment.

Rick
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Stevie Ray Christian

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Reply with quote  #8 
"Maybe I'll just kiss the coin hahaha"

Rick,

I think you might be on to something. How about saying, "As for the silver... kiss it goodbye." [You then blow a kiss] "And that royal penny..." [blowing another kiss] "Kiss Her Majesty goodbye too... That leaves us with the Yuen" [raising it to your mouth, facilitate the vanish and make eye contact with a spectator and extend your hand toward her] "You know the drill... kiss it goodbye."

That really is a nice and baffling sequence of vanishes that you do. If you can get the spectator to blow that kiss, and your audience doesn't applaud the final vanish, gaze into your "empty" hand look back at the spectator and say, "Well done! Give her a hand everyone!" You can "applaud" with the crowd as a convincer that your hands are empty. This also creates a good energy and emphasis for the final revelation. Your audience should be ready to applaud again... If they are left stunned and gawking at the coins and the purse, you could say, "How about that! Amazing isn't it? Give me a hand everybody!

As for that coin purse, I know what you mean about saying the "p" word. You can simply refer to it generically (it, here, this). Maybe give the odd object an introduction, "Let me show you this crazy thing I won in a dice game... these three coins were tucked inside..." 

If you want a good laugh up front, you could say, "I was recently in Japan... look at this crazy thing I won in a poker game..."

Hello-font-b-Kitty-b-font-Coin-Purse-small-wallets-mini-change-purse-wholesale-lot-animal.jpg

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Rick Holcombe

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Reply with quote  #9 
Eeeeeewwwwww.
Hahaha
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JohnnyNewYork

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Reply with quote  #10 
Rick -- I realize I'm a little late to the races with this, but although I am one of those "dedicated card guys" only,  I was REALLY impressed, not only with your coin routine but with your personality presenting it (and the background music fit very well, too).  Those vanishes at the end were awesome!  I'd also like to give praise to Stevie Ray (and the others) for the clear, detailed suggestions as well -- that's what makes this Forum so unique!  Anyway, you have a "killer" coin routine going for you!!!  johnny
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Rick Holcombe

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Reply with quote  #11 
Thanks Johnny,

That means a lot.

Stay tuned...

Rick
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