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Robin Dawes

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Hi everyone

My mind is like Swiss cheese sometimes.  In the very recent past I learned an effect - I remember the effect and the method and I have been working on it ... but (you know what is coming) I can't remember where it was taught!  There's an excellent chance it was right here, but some amount of searching has not brought it to light. 

So I am hoping that someone will recognize it and tell me where I saw it.  Derisive laughter at my memory lapse is appropriate.

Here's the effect:  the magician mixes the cards until stopped by the volunteer.  Three cards are dealt face down.   The magician turns his back.  The volunteer peeks one of the cards, then switches the positions of the other two.  The magician turns around again, inserts the 3 facedown cards into the deck and squares it up. 

The magician then names the card that was peeked.

Ring any bells - please?  I want to add this quickie to my database.

Robin
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Mike Powers

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I don't recall the source of this effect. Below is a description of the effect from an online source. The originator is not named. Sounds like a Martin Gardner, or Paul Curry concept.

Someone will remember....

M
================== 

Put three cards face-up on the table.  Ask a spectator to choose one  mentally  and remember its position.  Flip the three cards over.

Turn around and instruct the spectator to show the other spectators which card he has chosen, then have him switch the two  other  cards behind your back.

Now face the table again and instruct the spectators to switch cards as many times as they wish in front of your eyes.

Reveal the card originally chosen by the spectator.

Secret :

Before you flip the cards and turn around, remember which card is in the middle.  When you face the table again, focus of the card which is now in the middle and keep track of its position as spectators move cards around.

Flip that card.

If this is the card you had memorized, simply announce that this is the card the spectators have chosen  (this is so because the spectator clearly hasn't switched the middle card behind your back in this case).  Otherwise, the chosen card can be neither the one you had memorized nor the one you're now seeing.  It's the third card.

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Robin Dawes

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Thanks Mike!

The effect you describe is related - I think they may both be derived from one of Hummer's ideas, and I'm pretty sure Martin Gardner's Encyclopedia of Impromptu Magic has a version using coffee cups ... if I can remember that from so long ago, why can't I recall where I saw this within the last week??

A key feature of the version I am trying to source is that the magician never (apparently) sees the faces of the cards.  The method is a combination of the Biddle Force from Card Conspiracy Volume 1 and a clever method of learning the identity of the selection by peeking just one of the tabled cards.

Robin

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Harry Lorayne

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       I worked with the 3-card Hummer idea decades ago. I did it without looking - in other words, the spectator switched cards and just called off the switches ("1/3" - "2/3" - "1/2" - etc.) stopped whenever he liked and I'd turn around and turn over his card. Could be done over the phone. I know that Martin Gardner asked my permission to include it in a column he did for Scientific American - he did, with credit to me. And I think - darned if I can be sure - that I may have taught it in one of my books. Perhaps someone can do the research. (The key to the thing is your right thumb and 1st and 2nd fingers.)
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Paul Hallas

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Dawes
Thanks Mike!

The effect you describe is related - I think they may both be derived from one of Hummer's ideas, and I'm pretty sure Martin Gardner's Encyclopedia of Impromptu Magic has a version using coffee cups ... if I can remember that from so long ago, why can't I recall where I saw this within the last week??

A key feature of the version I am trying to source is that the magician never (apparently) sees the faces of the cards.  The method is a combination of the Biddle Force from Card Conspiracy Volume 1 and a clever method of learning the identity of the selection by peeking just one of the tabled cards.

Robin



I think the coffee cup version is more often associated with Al Koran, it's in his "Professional Presentations" book. 
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Harry Lorayne

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    Okay; just came to me - I teach it in my book, MATHEMATICAL WIZARDRY - titled Count On Your Fingers. And it's in the MATHEMATICAL WIZARDRY section in LORAYNE: THE CLASSIC COLLECTION, Vol. 5.

    If you don't/didn't know it - check it out - you may just LOVE it. It's something I've used for  a loooooong time.
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Mike Powers

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Thanks for the Hummer ref. I had forgotten where the basic idea came from. Harry's take sounds cool. Must check on that.

Mike
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Robin Dawes

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Hallas


I think the coffee cup version is more often associated with Al Koran, it's in his "Professional Presentations" book. 


Thanks for that info [smile]

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Robin Dawes

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Well it took a while, but ... I finally found the source I was looking for!

The item is called "Hummer Job" by Jon Racherbaumer, and it appeared in Genii in May 2016.  That particular issue had managed to get itself buried under a stack of Discrete Math, Data Structures, and Algorithms texts.  It only came to light when I was tidying my office in search of something else entirely.  I had tried the online search tools but without remembering the author or the title, there wasn't much to go on. 

The trick can be done with a shuffled, borrowed deck in poor condition, and is a nice little quickie.  I particularly like the overhand shuffle force he teaches.

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Harry Lorayne

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     Glad you found your "source." Now compare it to my presentation (particularly the no looking part) as I've talked about above.
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Robin Dawes

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Hi Harry

The "no looking" aspect is very strong!

Robin
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Magic-Aly

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This trick was originally marketed by Bob Hummer in 1951 as "Mathematical Three-Card Monte".  It was subsequently written up in Martin Gardner's book, Mathematics, Magic and Mystery. It has sometimes been referred to by various sources as "Bob Hummers 3-Object Divination."

In Hummer's original version, you don't turn around. Instead, you have them call out the objects as they are switched, and then you turn around.

Max Abrams developed an intriguing version of the trick, but routined it as a test of the spectator's ESP.  In that particular version, the performer mixes the cards.  It is called Hummeracle, and was published in the March 1990 issue of Genii.

My personal way of presenting, which I independently devised before becoming aware of the Abrams routine, is to present it as an experiment to test the spectator's power of mental telepathy.  Realizing that, like many magicians, I was suffering from "Cardtrickitis" (too many card tricks!), I started doing it at the bar with three cardboard beer coasters. (Oftentimes, I use three of my business cards, and at times, three identical pieces of thick paper or cardboard).  

I have each of three spectators write their name on the back of a coaster, and I memorize the name that's on the middle coaster.  I then turn around, and then have them turn the coasters over face-down and switch the two that do not have the thought-of name on them. When I turn back around to face them, I ask them to start switching them all around, 3-card monte style.  Of course, the correct name is always divined by means of the way Mike explained in his post.

This is super strong and always receives a great reaction.  I am finding more and more that modern-day audiences are really drawn to mentalism 
type effects. And since they are integrally involved in the routine, and their own names are used, there is a built-in emotional hook. You could not ask more of a routine that can be done impromptu, virtually anywhere, anytime that paper and pen or pencil is available. Note: If there is only one spectator, I have him/her write the names of someone close to them (friends or family members) on the backs; or if there are two spectators, I have each write their name on a coaster or business card, and have them write my name on the third - for a bit of name recognition/branding.
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Jake07712

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Reply with quote  #13 
There are 3 sure ways to improve your memory ... 1) write things down, and I forgot what the other 2 was.
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