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chris w

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Reply with quote  #1 
Prompted by seeing that the familiar version of Stewart James' "Miraskill" in The Jinx #24 is immediately followed by a charming non-card version also conceived by James, which has two different colors of Hershey's Kisses being sorted onto two plates held by two young participants:

What else, other than cards, have you employed the Miraskill principle with?

A little research revealed that versions with coins and differently-colored spheres have been explored, including by Max Maven and our own Michael Breggar. The Jerx has a very clever version with dirty laundry (colors and whites).

I'm curious about what you have used or thought of using.

It seems there are a practically infinite number of things you could do the trick with: basically, any time you have two groups of things and know the relevant information, you can do at least one phase. Impromptu and impromptu-seeming opportunities abound.

For example:
  • Pink and white in a box of Good & Plenty, with spectator shaking out two at a time.
  • Phillips head and straight-slot screws being shaken out of a small jar in your junk drawer.
  • Books pulled off a shelf in pairs by participant unaware of why they're doing it (sorting criteria revealed later and indicated in prediction can be topic, male/female author, etc.)
  • Junk pile of two different colors of old tile torn out of a bathroom.
  • Adults and children leaving a movie theater.
  • People with and without ties exiting a conference room.
  • Cars and SUVs exiting a parking lot that you know everyone is leaving.

What else can you think of? What else have you done?
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #2 
I've done nothing original, but I have played around with Michael Breggar's Coinsyian Economics routine, and it's fantastic. As an amateur with limited performing opportunities, I rehearsed the routine and performed it maybe three times, and it seemed to be a hit. There's a lot going on, and it takes some discipline to get it sharp enough for the real world, but it's worth the effort. It'd play well on television, I think, so maybe some enterprising young magician out there will adopt it for P&T Fool Us. You can find it in Five Roads to Vegas.

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Bob Farmer

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Reply with quote  #3 
I recall Michael Weber had a great version with different colored socks.
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Farmer
I recall Michael Weber had a great version with different colored socks.


That's right! It's in Life Savers.

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chris w

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Reply with quote  #5 
Was that Miraskill or the Piano Card Trick?
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris w
Was that Miraskill or the Piano Card Trick?


Piano Card... I looked it up. Sure struck a chord as Miraskill though! Thanks for the opportunity to clarify. 

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chris w

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Reply with quote  #7 
Still on point, as the Piano Card Trick can also be done with lots of objects that aren't cards. Socks are a good idea for both tricks.
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #8 
My favourite version of the Piano Trick is Jim Steinmeyer's Great Silverware Scam - he uses a bucket or bag full of cutlery.  The patter is about laying out two tables in a restaurant, pairing up the knives and forks - magically an extra fork flies from one table to the other.

I never thought about it but Miraskill could be done with cutlery.

My current favourite Miraskill version is Bannon's View to a 'Skill
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Mbreggar

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hey folks. First off, thanks for the kind words about "Coin-Seyan Economics." I have always liked Mira-Skill but found it lacked a satisfying conclusion (it lacked any kind of ending, in fact!!). That was one of the impetuses for "Coin-Seyan...": give Mira-Skill the proper ending it needed. There's also a fair amount of time spent counting in Mira-Skill. The same is true in "Coin-Seyen ..." but I found it can be mollified with performance and comedy. So, my routining includes lots of jokes and flat-out one-liners regarding money, economics, business, politics, etc. 

In fact .. if anyone is enterprising enough to perform this trick in a demo tape audition for P&T, I will gladly help write the jokes that fit the performer!

Getting back to Chris W's original question, Jules Lanier, in the September 1969 Genii magazine, used colored glass stones and an I-Ching-like theme. (It was this version that started me thinking about using coins.)

--michael
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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #10 
Check out "The James File," Volume [2]. It's actually the third book in the James series.

There's a section called "Miraschool" which mostly features card ideas, but there are suggestions for other odds and ends. Ed Marlo has a an interesting idea on the theme of basket ball. He called it "Basket Call".

Worth a look.
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chris w

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Reply with quote  #11 
Thanks, Alan. Someday I'll get the James books!
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Intensely Magic

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Dawes


My current favourite Miraskill version is Bannon's View to a 'Skill


Likewise. We had a discussion on this trick about three years ago. It's my favorite when working for engineer types. Inexplicable to the logical mind.

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