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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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I got a lot of these things for Christmas and I finally got everything ready. My wife surprised me with the mirrors for Christmas and the rest of the stuff was collected from the internet and from the local magic shop. The hardest to find item, which literally took me almost two months to find, was the small vase I wanted for the rope and vase trick. I went to every thrift store in town, leaving my least favorite store to the very last. Of course, that is where it was. My library is microscopic, but I think of pretty high quality. I have Harry Lorayne's "The Magic Book", Karl Fulves "Self-Working Rope Tricks", and my daughter bought me a used copy of" Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic". I took RayJ's, and other's advice, to buy some replica silver dollar coins instead of using half-dollars and yes, my magic wand is a stainless steel chopstick.

magic table.jpg 


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chris w

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What fun, Sam. Looks like you're off to a fine start, and I especially like that it was a family project to get you all set up.

You might be interested in this thread on the Mark Wilson book, where I joined EndersGame and others in listing some favorites from my most recent pass through the book:

https://www.themagiciansforum.com/post/mark-wilsons-complete-course-in-magic-8582522
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Tom G

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Nice setup.  That's a heck of a mirror.
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Nice setup.  That's a heck of a mirror.[/QUOTE

I am afraid it is endangered. My wife saw it and immediately started talking about how nice a make-up mirror it would make. I may lose it soon. [frown]

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #5 
Very cool! That rope looks especially plush. I like thick ropes, still have some I bought from Daryl Martinez.

How is the quality of the dollars?
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ
Very cool! That rope looks especially plush. I like thick ropes, still have some I bought from Daryl Martinez.

How is the quality of the dollars?


Actually, they are really good pieces. They have heft, so they aren't the thin ones. The detail is crisp, but they still look old. I don't have much experience with replica coins but these seem to be really good. It took several weeks to arrive from China, I ordered them 12/21 and they came 1/09.

Here's the link to ebay: https://www.ebay.com/itm/10pcs-Steel-Morgan-39mm-Dollar-Magic-Accessories/123388428582?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

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John Cowne

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamtheNotsoMagnificent
Nice setup.  That's a heck of a mirror.[/QUOTE

I am afraid it is endangered. My wife saw it and immediately started talking about how nice a make-up mirror it would make. I may lose it soon. [frown]
Nice place to hone skills/spur on creativity, Sam. Maybe you can ‘share’ the mirror with a promise that cosmetics don’t get on the mat...or just see it as an intense bonding experience. BTW, I’m always on the prowl for different containers for the Miser’s Dream, and came across an old-style steel milkshake container that could focus a story-line involving ‘the cost of a milkshake in the old days compared to now’ (work in progress). What’s the bunny’s name? What’s his C.V.?
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Cowne
Nice place to hone skills/spur on creativity, Sam. Maybe you can ‘share’ the mirror with a promise that cosmetics don’t get on the mat...or just see it as an intense bonding experience. BTW, I’m always on the prowl for different containers for the Miser’s Dream, and came across an old-style steel milkshake container that could focus a story-line involving ‘the cost of a milkshake in the old days compared to now’ (work in progress). What’s the bunny’s name? What’s his C.V.?


Lol, the bunny's name is Topper. I don't know what C.V. means. I haven't worked up a trick yet, but I'm thinking of a production, of course. Funny you should mention a milkshake container, I almost bought one last week at a thrift store, but it may have just been the bottom to a cocktail shaker as well.

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John Cowne

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamtheNotsoMagnificent


Lol, the bunny's name is Topper. I don't know what C.V. means. I haven't worked up a trick yet, but I'm thinking of a production, of course. Funny you should mention a milkshake container, I almost bought one last week at a thrift store, but it may have just been the bottom to a cocktail shaker as well.
Hey Sam, C.V. is short for 'curriculum vitae':"a  brief account of a person's education, qualifications, and previous occupations, typically sent with a job application"; sounds like Topper (cool name) is still forming his. My bunny's Pete - and he does a mind-reading act with a colour cube,which he has to do to support a ravenous appetite for sponge carrots. I originally had thoughts of the traditional cocktail shaker, but I thought the milkshake container is probably (hopefully) a little more identifiable to my usual audience - kids 😉. Never know these days.
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Cowne
Hey Sam, C.V. is short for 'curriculum vitae':"a  brief account of a person's education, qualifications, and previous occupations, typically sent with a job application"; sounds like Topper (cool name) is still forming his. My bunny's Pete - and he does a mind-reading act with a colour cube,which he has to do to support a ravenous appetite for sponge carrots. I originally had thoughts of the traditional cocktail shaker, but I thought the milkshake container is probably (hopefully) a little more identifiable to my usual audience - kids 😉. Never know these days.


I didn't know they had sponge carrots. That's a really cool idea. I got Topper by accident and my grandson showed no interest in him so I thought I could so something with him.  At this time I am shying away from mentalism and mostly sticking with sleight of hand and a few props. However, doing some mentalism with a bunny is pretty clever...hmmmm? Even though I have limited props and tricks, my plate seems exceptionally full as I am still learning skills and developing my act.

One of the things I've learned from listening to the magicians here and elsewhere is to try and think laterally. Whenever I find something that is difficult for me or even impossible, I try to think around it and add the limitation into the act. I was working on my spread cull with the cards in the picture. I cannot seem to be able to pull out the aces unless I stop at each one, then I have no problem. I orignally wanted to use the spread cull to bring the remaining three aces (The Ace of Spades is already out) to the top without stopping just by spreading the deck but I can't do it. So, now I have the spectator touch each ace and I cull it and move on to the next. Then I have them tap the back of the deck, and voila, the aces appear at the top after they had just seen them spread throughout the deck. Doing that also shows there are no extra aces in the deck.

Anyway, I  am hoping that by May 10, my one year anniversary of joining TMF, I will have my card routine locked down and few other tricks as well.

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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #11 
Two things Sam - 1) For culling, check out Ackerman on the Brother John cull. It's really easy and very effective. 2) Dan Garrett sells sponge carrots. His routine uses them in the same way he uses the sponge bananas he sells. You seem to take the one you're holding and put it in a bag or your pocket. But then another one pops up in your hand. Repeat indefinitely.

Check HERE for Dan's site. Scroll down a bit more than half way for the sponge carrots. 

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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #12 
Thanks for the references PressureFan. I think Allan taught the concept in his Magician's Forum lecture. So many may have a video tutorial. It'a also in a couple of sets of his notes as I recall.

I'll try to find the issue of MAGIC with the Bro. John article.

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Lucas Maillard

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
It's also in a couple of sets of his notes as I recall.


Yep, it's in his Card Theater 2019 lecture notes, at p.15.
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Lugnuty

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lugnuty
Sam....I found many...(too many my wife says!) books ..including the ones you mentioned at ThriftBooks.com.....most are under $5.00.
They have free shipping on anything over $10 and you get points for free books. I don’t own stock but you would think so looking at my bookshelf!
I love your setup. I need to do the same. Seems I’m always practicing in my recliner watching TV so when I get to a table I have to adjust everything.

Lee
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John Cowne

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
Two things Sam - 1) For culling, check out Ackerman on the Brother John cull. It's really easy and very effective. 2) Dan Garrett sells sponge carrots. His routine uses them in the same way he uses the sponge bananas he sells. You seem to take the one you're holding and put it in a bag or your pocket. But then another one pops up in your hand. Repeat indefinitely.

Check HERE for Dan's site. Scroll down a bit more than half way for the sponge carrots. 

Mike
Yes, Mike, the carrots look reasonably realistic from maybe 5 feet away (kids have disturbingly good visual acuity). Even so, their ‘gag value’ quickly makes up for that. There are a lot of cool ‘additions’ to balls in sponge magic these days, that help you create magical stories. I had a go at making my own bananas; it was a fun process, but nowhere near the quality of my bought ones. And then there’s some very realistic donuts, chips (‘fries’), and - if you really want to excite kids ... BROCCOLI 😏! I’ve even seen eyeballs (considering; not got them yet...I’m always a bit sensitive about ‘age-appropriateness’). Sam, do you get the feeling that considering the props etc that you’ve accumulated in 9 months, what the future has in store for you (re: storage)? It’s a fun dilemma.
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Mike Powers

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RE: bananas - Tom Frank sells latex bananas for the Garrett routine. They look more realistic and respond nearly as well as the sponge bananas.

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John Cowne

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
RE: bananas - Tom Frank sells latex bananas for the Garrett routine. They look more realistic and respond nearly as well as the sponge bananas.

Mike
I’ve heard (read? Can’t remember) that latex doesn't generally have the same ‘pop-up’ response as foam; they can sometimes have a lag when doing a ferocious repeat production. I guess that’s your ‘nearly as well’ proviso . But I can understand the ‘naturalness’ aspect is a ‘pro’ for latex. Hmm. I might buy and experiment. You can never have too many bananas. Sorry to divert the thread so much.
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Cowne
Sam, do you get the feeling that considering the props etc that you’ve accumulated in 9 months, what the future has in store for you (re: storage)? It’s a fun dilemma.


At this time, I have decided my entire act will have to fit in a M37 British Military haversack from 1951. Mainly, because I own a M37 haversack from 1951. 

As I have explored, watched, listened, and contemplated the various categories of magic plus the amount of money and other resources I can divert into art, I decided that with my act must be generated from inexpensive and easily portable items. I was inspired by a forum post, I don't remember where or by whom, from an old school magician who said he carried his entire act in a cigar box when he was stationed on a ship in the navy, I believe during WWII. So, with the exception of the mirrors and the books, I usually pack up everything you see in the picture and take it to work with me at night because I often have a couple of hours time to practice. If nothing else, I work on my in-jog shuffle and passes while listening to a podcast.

My tricks are sleight heavy, because knowledge and skill don't weigh anything or take up any room. I've brought some props, i.e. small cups and balls, a ball and vase set, sponge balls, etc but I have not bought any magic tricks, by that I mean gimmicks like Level One and things like that.

So my focus is on close-up magic, but that doesn't mean I won't go to more of parlour direction later, but this is where I am now. As I write this, I realize I have made a case for doing mentalism, but I really don't have much interest in it. Perhaps I should explore at least some mentalism tricks, but to be honest, I would not know where to begin.

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John Cowne

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamtheNotsoMagnificent


At this time, I have decided my entire act will have to fit in a M37 British Military haversack from 1951. Mainly, because I own a M37 haversack from 1951. 

Sam, I admire your commitment to restraint. I have been listening to Marie Kondo this morning while 're-arranging' things, so slight case of the guilts, but overcame it when my online magic shop sent an offer of a pre-loved 'Rim Shots' for $30! May the Force (of self-discipline) be with you.
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RayJ

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamtheNotsoMagnificent


At this time, I have decided my entire act will have to fit in a M37 British Military haversack from 1951. Mainly, because I own a M37 haversack from 1951. 

As I have explored, watched, listened, and contemplated the various categories of magic plus the amount of money and other resources I can divert into art, I decided that with my act must be generated from inexpensive and easily portable items. I was inspired by a forum post, I don't remember where or by whom, from an old school magician who said he carried his entire act in a cigar box when he was stationed on a ship in the navy, I believe during WWII. So, with the exception of the mirrors and the books, I usually pack up everything you see in the picture and take it to work with me at night because I often have a couple of hours time to practice. If nothing else, I work on my in-jog shuffle and passes while listening to a podcast.

My tricks are sleight heavy, because knowledge and skill don't weigh anything or take up any room. I've brought some props, i.e. small cups and balls, a ball and vase set, sponge balls, etc but I have not bought any magic tricks, by that I mean gimmicks like Level One and things like that.

So my focus is on close-up magic, but that doesn't mean I won't go to more of parlour direction later, but this is where I am now. As I write this, I realize I have made a case for doing mentalism, but I really don't have much interest in it. Perhaps I should explore at least some mentalism tricks, but to be honest, I would not know where to begin.


You can pack a lot of magic into small spaces.  When I used to do my manipulation act, all of my props fit into a small attache case.  And that was a 9 minute act.  The only bulky items I had were the doves, which obviously wouldn't like the briefcase, my table and the stand upon which the doves were displayed after production.  

Harry Monti had a wonderful stool that he made for performing.  It was rectangular and was made of wood, painted black.  The stool had various drawers in it that held his props.  If he chose to he could leave a drawer open in order to ditch things as he worked.  Otherwise he used his lap as a servante.  The stool was on casters and I believe it could be adjusted for height to account for tables of differing heights.  So in essence, Harry could walk in with this stool and all of the effects he was presenting were safely contained therein.  He did have a beautiful table that he created also and would use that as his working surface if the venue didn't have an appropriate one.  It was a "half-circle", padded and had attractive fringe around the perimeter.  Neat but not gaudy as they used to say.
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ


You can pack a lot of magic into small spaces.  When I used to do my manipulation act, all of my props fit into a small attache case.  And that was a 9 minute act.  The only bulky items I had were the doves, which obviously wouldn't like the briefcase, my table and the stand upon which the doves were displayed after production.  

Harry Monti had a wonderful stool that he made for performing.  It was rectangular and was made of wood, painted black.  The stool had various drawers in it that held his props.  If he chose to he could leave a drawer open in order to ditch things as he worked.  Otherwise he used his lap as a servante.  The stool was on casters and I believe it could be adjusted for height to account for tables of differing heights.  So in essence, Harry could walk in with this stool and all of the effects he was presenting were safely contained therein.  He did have a beautiful table that he created also and would use that as his working surface if the venue didn't have an appropriate one.  It was a "half-circle", padded and had attractive fringe around the perimeter.  Neat but not gaudy as they used to say.


From what I've heard, doves require a lot TLC and prep work, although the results can be truly "magical". I don't see myself using any animals, mostly because our cats would probably eat them. [eek]

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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Per Request My British M37 Haversack. Size 13" x 4" x 12"   (33 x 10 x 30 cm)

I added the cord to lengthen the strap. Very well made and very rugged. Someday, I will make a better looking strap.
sam5.jpg 
sam2.jpg 
sam4.jpg 
sam1.jpg 
sam3.jpg 
I pretty much store everything I use in the bag. The tin with the ship holds my decks of cards and I put a cardboard box in it to keep its shape and to protect my gear and it helps it stand up. I will replace it with a plastic box someday if I find one. The only thing I am not carrying in the bag is the vase. I need to find another tin that I can pad to protect it from breaking. You can just see the corner of some drawer liner material under my practice mat. I added the drawer liners because my mat wasn't thick enough and its perfect with the extra material. I will glue them on to the bottom soon.


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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #23 
Very cool bag.  They built them to survive in wartime, so they are certainly rugged.  Yours is in exceptional condition for 1951.  Certainly better than many folks that were hatched that year!
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #24 
RayJ - John Mendoza used the movable stool with drawers that you described. I hadn't realized that it was a Harry Monti idea. I think John M describes it in one of the Books of John. Too much for me to haul around though. I work standing anyway. Glenn Morphew turned me on to a really nice case for hauling around your close up stuff. Check on Amazon at:

SMALL CASE

LARGE CASE

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
RayJ - John Mendoza used the movable stool with drawers that you described. I hadn't realized that it was a Harry Monti idea. I think John M describes it in one of the Books of John. Too much for me to haul around though. I work standing anyway. Glenn Morphew turned me on to a really nice case for hauling around your close up stuff. Check on Amazon at:

SMALL CASE

LARGE CASE

Mike


I took lessons from Harry Monti when I was a young teenager.  He used the stool, along with the custom table that he had made.  He said he used it when he performed at the Magic Castle.  The other thing he liked about it was that since it didn't have a back, it didn't restrict his movement.  The stool was very well thought out and well executed.
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Cowne
Hey Sam, C.V. is short for 'curriculum vitae':"a  brief account of a person's education, qualifications, and previous occupations, typically sent with a job application"; sounds like Topper (cool name) is still forming his. My bunny's Pete - and he does a mind-reading act with a colour cube,which he has to do to support a ravenous appetite for sponge carrots. I originally had thoughts of the traditional cocktail shaker, but I thought the milkshake container is probably (hopefully) a little more identifiable to my usual audience - kids 😉. Never know these days.


Well John,

Topper's C.V. is starting to be written. He's a narc.

Chris W. sent me a copy of "Magic With Cards" by Garcia and Schindler (Thank you, Sir!) and it has a fun little self-working trick called "Big Ben" that I added some sleights to make it stronger and I also set Topper up to "watch" what's going on. (This is a work in progress, so this is just the script I've written. No performance as of yet.)

Right before I make the reveal, I recap "Okay, you shuffled and cut the cards, I shuffled and cut the cards, so the deck was mixed up and you haven't told me the number you picked, so I have no way of knowing the number you picked unless I somehow saw the cards you counted out earlier in the trick, but my back was turned the whole time..."

At this point I pick up Topper and make a somewhat exaggerated show of trying to be casual, but failing, as I bring him up to my ear so he can surreptitiously "whisper" the number in my ear and then I continue:

"...so I had no way of know you picked the number six (or whatever)."

I think this will play funny.



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John Cowne

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Reply with quote  #27 
That sounds great, Sam! One thing I do with Pete is tell the kids Pete and I are going to turn away, while they make the (colour cube) switch. When I am turned around, Pete slowly moves over my shoulder to ‘sneak a peak’. So far, whenever I’ve done that, the audience screams out, ‘Pete’s looking - he’s cheating!!’. That’s one of the moments the onlooking parents remember. I have a recalcitrant rabbit. At some stage would love to see a video of Topper in action.
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Cowne
That sounds great, Sam! One thing I do with Pete is tell the kids Pete and I are going to turn away, while they make the (colour cube) switch. When I am turned around, Pete slowly moves over my shoulder to ‘sneak a peak’. So far, whenever I’ve done that, the audience screams out, ‘Pete’s looking - he’s cheating!!’. That’s one of the moments the onlooking parents remember. I have a recalcitrant rabbit. At some stage would love to see a video of Topper in action.


Oh, that's brilliant!

I need to work it out, I keep forgetting my key card [rolleyes], but once I have it down pat, I will try and get something recorded, or maybe do it in a session if possible.

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RayJ

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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Cowne
That sounds great, Sam! One thing I do with Pete is tell the kids Pete and I are going to turn away, while they make the (colour cube) switch. When I am turned around, Pete slowly moves over my shoulder to ‘sneak a peak’. So far, whenever I’ve done that, the audience screams out, ‘Pete’s looking - he’s cheating!!’. That’s one of the moments the onlooking parents remember. I have a recalcitrant rabbit. At some stage would love to see a video of Topper in action.


I think this is great also.  Any time you can get the kids "into it" you win.  Not only do they have a great time, it shows the other parents how much fun it can be to have a magician at their party.  Repeat business is important.  

One of the easiest and best things you can do for kids is the one where you pull a silk out of your pocket and another one sticks out.  They tell you that it is there, you act surprised.  Then you pull that one out and there is another, and another, etc.  The kids go nuts.  You have to have the proper acting of course.  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamtheNotsoMagnificent


Oh, that's brilliant!

I need to work it out, I keep forgetting my key card [rolleyes], but once I have it down pat, I will try and get something recorded, or maybe do it in a session if possible.


Sam, you were probably joking, but in case you weren't, it is simple to fix.  Just use the same key card all the time.  Never change it.  Nobody but you will be the wiser.  You can also help yourself by either making it a breather or just give it a crimped corner.  You could go all out and make it a corner short too.  I don't always do it, but there was a period of time when I would always have one card that was a corner short.  Sometimes it would be the Joker or Extra Joker.  That way they could be "in play" or not.  Just some thoughts.
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ


Sam, you were probably joking, but in case you weren't, it is simple to fix.  Just use the same key card all the time.  Never change it.  Nobody but you will be the wiser.  You can also help yourself by either making it a breather or just give it a crimped corner.  You could go all out and make it a corner short too.  I don't always do it, but there was a period of time when I would always have one card that was a corner short.  Sometimes it would be the Joker or Extra Joker.  That way they could be "in play" or not.  Just some thoughts.


Unfortunately, I wasn't joking about not remembering.

I do use the same key card that with my red and blue aviator decks that I carry for two deck tricks. I always have the 4H at the bottom for the red and the 5C at the bottom of the blue deck and I can let the other person choose whatever deck they want.

As for the Big Ben trick as it's presented in the book, in my opinion,  it looks exactly like what it is, a counting trick.

So, I have the spectator shuffle and cut the deck and then I do the same, "just  to mix the cards up more", but of course putting the key card into position. I think this flies better because it doesn't look like just a counting trick and I can use a borrowed deck to do the trick. The key card is the bottom card after the spectator shuffles, however, by the time I've gotten everything in place, I've usually forgotten what the card was, grrr. I am working on method/system to help me remember the card.

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RayJ

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamtheNotsoMagnificent


Unfortunately, I wasn't joking about not remembering.

I do use the same key card that with my red and blue aviator decks that I carry for two deck tricks. I always have the 4H at the bottom for the red and the 5C at the bottom of the blue deck and I can let the other person choose whatever deck they want.

As for the Big Ben trick as it's presented in the book, in my opinion,  it looks exactly like what it is, a counting trick.

So, I have the spectator shuffle and cut the deck and then I do the same, "just  to mix the cards up more", but of course putting the key card into position. I think this flies better because it doesn't look like just a counting trick and I can use a borrowed deck to do the trick. The key card is the bottom card after the spectator shuffles, however, by the time I've gotten everything in place, I've usually forgotten what the card was, grrr. I am working on method/system to help me remember the card.


One way would be to have the number represent something personal to you.  If you favorite number is 7, then the 7 it is.  Then pick your favorite suit.  Or maybe in the two deck trick you mentioned you use the two numbers that represent the year you were married, graduated high school, etc.  By attaching meaning to something it might be easier to recall.

One easy way would be to use the king of clubs.  KC = Key Card, simple.
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Reply with quote  #33 
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Originally Posted by RayJ


One way would be to have the number represent something personal to you.  If you favorite number is 7, then the 7 it is.  Then pick your favorite suit.  Or maybe in the two deck trick you mentioned you use the two numbers that represent the year you were married, graduated high school, etc.  By attaching meaning to something it might be easier to recall.

One easy way would be to use the king of clubs.  KC = Key Card, simple.
 

I see, create an emotional connection. Thanks for that.

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chris w

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Reply with quote  #34 
In seeing what mention had been made of the Garcia & Schindler book here on the forum, I found this thread where Rudy demos something from it:

https://www.themagiciansforum.com/post/color-separation-from-magic-with-cards-garcia-schindler-8241349

Of course, there is already an entire performing repertoire in the Lorayne and Wilson books.
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Reply with quote  #35 
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Originally Posted by chris w
In seeing what mention had been made of the Garcia & Schindler book here on the forum, I found this thread where Rudy demos something from it:

https://www.themagiciansforum.com/post/color-separation-from-magic-with-cards-garcia-schindler-8241349

Of course, there is already an entire performing repertoire in the Lorayne and Wilson books.


I don't know how other people create their routines or choose a trick, but what I do is find the tricks that just seem "right" for me, so having multiple sources for tricks is always great because I won't do most of the tricks in a book, at least not all at once.

That being said, as time passes, skills increase, and interests change I will go back and revisit the various tricks. Even in the relatively short amount of time I've been practicing, I've noticed that some things that I thought were super-complicated and difficult when I started have become easy.



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Reply with quote  #36 
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Originally Posted by PressureFan
Mike,

You can also find this cull in October 2007 MUM, page 55, in a trick of Alan Ackerman’s called ‘The Cipher’.
And, I think, Brother John Hamman On Culling in February Magic Mag, pg 92. My notes don't show which year.


The year is 2007. Unfortunately, I don't know how to acces the old Magic magazine back issues.

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Reply with quote  #37 
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Originally Posted by SamtheNotsoMagnificent


I don't know how other people create their routines or choose a trick, but what I do is find the tricks that just seem "right" for me, so having multiple sources for tricks is always great because I won't do most of the tricks in a book, at least not all at once.

That being said, as time passes, skills increase, and interests change I will go back and revisit the various tricks. Even in the relatively short amount of time I've been practicing, I've noticed that some things that I thought were super-complicated and difficult when I started have become easy.




I think that what happens is that as your skillset increases, so does your ability to learn.
Not exactly the same thing, but the old adage, if your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail, seems to apply.

So as you learn, there is a certain momentum that occurs.  That momentum increases to where one day you can read a trick and at least do a "walk through" almost immediately.  You can because you already know all of the small parts that go into creating the whole.

At least that's been my experience.  The fact that you see progress is exciting and should encourage you to keep reaching!
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Reply with quote  #38 
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Originally Posted by RayJ


I think that what happens is that as your skillset increases, so does your ability to learn.
Not exactly the same thing, but the old adage, if your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail, seems to apply.

So as you learn, there is a certain momentum that occurs.  That momentum increases to where one day you can read a trick and at least do a "walk through" almost immediately.  You can because you already know all of the small parts that go into creating the whole.

At least that's been my experience.  The fact that you see progress is exciting and should encourage you to keep reaching!


Progress is definitely being made. I would say my stuff needs polishing, but I've got the moves down, except for the multi-card spread cull and I occaisonally flash my Apex Aces, but that is one of my newest tricks. I have tried looking up the articles that Mike Powers recommends on the cull, but I have had no luck there. Still, that is not stopping me, I just work around it and maybe it isn't the right way to transition from my ambitious card to my Twisting the Aces part of the routine.  I found I need more work on my pinky flick, it is not consistent. I use it as a flourish at the end of my ambitious card routine when I whistle and snap my fingers and the Ace of Spades flies out and lands into my other hand.

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Reply with quote  #39 
Sam, one of the things you need to pay attention to in your culling is rhythm.  I have mentioned rhythm many times in regard to magic sleights such as the Elmsley Count.  To me, good culling incorporates a certain rhythm.  If you watch Kostya Kimlat, a master of culling, you will see what I mean.  You can probably find a video of him doing his "Oil and Water" routine online.  He takes a shuffled deck and separates reds and blacks via the cull in one pass and does it faster than many can cull 4 cards.  Amazing stuff.
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Reply with quote  #40 
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Originally Posted by Mike Powers
RayJ - John Mendoza used the movable stool with drawers that you described. I hadn't realized that it was a Harry Monti idea. I think John M describes it in one of the Books of John. Too much for me to haul around though. I work standing anyway. Glenn Morphew turned me on to a really nice case for hauling around your close up stuff. Check on Amazon at:

SMALL CASE

LARGE CASE

Mike


WOW, those cases look like the one I got from TCC. Just missing that middle extra pocket holders. A much better price as well. I do highly recommend those case as you can organize your props as you wish and its very easy to carry. I can also use the case as table as long as you carry a card mat. 
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