Sign up Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
MatthewOlsen

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 141
Reply with quote  #1 
I have a routine that I put together, nothing revolutionary or anything, but it uses a paddle move with a coin at the start of the trick.  I have a paddle move that I'm using but I'm not fond of the move because it isn't as strong as I'd like and it doesn't withstand much repetition. 

I was wondering if anyone could lead me to a resource where I might find a better paddle move.  I would prefer something that could be done standing without a table but that's not vital. 

The main reason I have been using the move that I have despite it not being very strong is that I can hold out a small object in finger palm without it being seen while doing the move.  Something similar would be perfect because the biggest effect in the routine is changing the coin into a ball and I never go to my pockets after I take out the coin because I'm holding out the whole time. 

Any help would be appreciated. 
0
RayJ

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 683
Reply with quote  #2 
Take a look here for references...

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=357414&forum=3
0
Rudy Tinoco

Avatar / Picture

Founding Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,251
Reply with quote  #3 
I'm not sure if you're still looking for help with this but my friend, Dan Waterman, is a member here and he does quite a bit of magic using the paddle move. I'll ask him if he might be able to chime in and offer some ideas.

Rudy

__________________
www.youtube.com/themagiciansforum
http://www.facebook.com/themagiciansforum
0
Waterman

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 569
Reply with quote  #4 
Sounds like an interesting idea...after I read the post I went straight to my close-up table and figured out a way to do a convincing turnover of a coin on the table which replicates a paddle move to some degree in that it shows the same side of the coin after it has been flipped over. However I get the feeling you would rather do the move standing...what size coin are you working with?

You mentioned withstanding repetition...I think repetition sometimes can kill even the best paddle move as it can draw attention to what should be a simple display of two sides of an object.

I would love to see a video of the routine as I'm now envisioning a routine that would be used on a table surface using a paddle move with coins to do a cooper, silver brass routine.
0
Chi Han

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,041
Reply with quote  #5 
Not sure if this is still needed, but as it's been bumped....

Only My Apocalypse from Harry Lorayne has 2 ways to do show a coin the same on both sides in the Flip-Over-View chapter on page 59.  Apparently there are 8 methods in the original issue which is June 1981.  The methods look pretty neat, though I don't really have a routine to use them in.
0
Michaelblue

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,149
Reply with quote  #6 
I do a paddle move during a copper/silver routine, but i dont do it but once or twice, just because i dont want to over prove anything.
0
Geoff Weber

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #7 
A gag my dad used to show me when I was a kid (and I still use on occasion) where he would pretend a normal coin was double-faced. I'm sure that could be applied in this instance. He did it in a sort of slapping motion from hand to hand, (allowing the coin flipping over to be disguised by the bigger motion of the hand slapping)
0
Waterman

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 569
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoff Weber
A gag my dad used to show me when I was a kid (and I still use on occasion) where he would pretend a normal coin was double-faced. I'm sure that could be applied in this instance. He did it in a sort of slapping motion from hand to hand, (allowing the coin flipping over to be disguised by the bigger motion of the hand slapping)


YES...Excellent idea!

I might be reaching waaay too far for a method, but I considered using tweezers to pick up a C/S coin and doing a traditional paddle move the same way John Bannon uses a pair of tweezers to show a mini-card blank on both sides (Photologic; Smoke and Mirrors. P.113).

The grip might be a little awkward holding a coin in the tweezers as opposed to a flat piece of card stock, but I will try it out for lack of anything better to do this afternoon.

...and to those who will ask what my justification to spectators is for using tweezers to display a coin I think I may have an idea or two, but would welcome any ideas no matter how wild and crazy!
0
MatthewOlsen

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 141
Reply with quote  #9 
The only justification I can think of for the tweezers is starting with the pretense that this is a rare coin and shouldn't be touched by human hands.  It wouldn't work for my routine because I have to pick up the coin to do the bobo switch to transform the coin into a ball. 

I was preparing to shoot a small video demonstrating the routine but I found the ball was missing.  I could show just the paddle move I'm using but I would prefer feedback on the whole routine.  I'm going to try to find a source locally for the steel ball bearings.  I don't want to order them online because I'm in Alaska and shipping can be prohibitive.  The shop where I got them originally closed down a couple years ago. 

I adapted the move from a paddle move I saw done with a credit card.

0
Paul Hallas

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,140
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MatthewOlsen

I adapted the move from a paddle move I saw done with a credit card.



That would probably be this:
http://geniimagazine.com/magicpedia/Carlyle_False_Turnover

I recall a tabled coin/chip turnover was described in the first New York Magic Symposium book.


0
MatthewOlsen

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 141
Reply with quote  #11 
Yes, I think that's it. 

I use an Eisenhower dollar for the move and am able to keep a small ball in finger palm at the same time.  I've got to watch my angles a little bit to hide the ball but I've rarely had anyone spot it, probably because the coin provides visual and psychological cover.  The paddle move gets spotted every once in a while.  I reduced the amount of times I use it during the routine and altered how I present it a little which has helped.  Instead of just turning it over I am showing the face to one side of the audience and do the turnover as I place the coin in the other hand to show to the other side of the audience. 
0
MatthewOlsen

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 141
Reply with quote  #12 
Here's the coin routine I've developed using this paddle move.  I'm calling it Heads I win, Heads I win.  I hope you like it.




0
MatthewOlsen

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 141
Reply with quote  #13 
And here's a closer look at the move and a brief discussion of my dilemma.  Upon thinking further about why I'm getting caught occasionally, I was considering whether it's actually a matter of how I'm introducing the routine.  The two other paddle moves I show at the end might also be used as an additional convincer, executed while I'm talking about tossing the coin and it always landing heads.  The only problem with them is they only work with a table and I use this for walk around. 




Anyway, any feedback would be welcome.

0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.