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Mind Phantom

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Reply with quote  #1 
I think I am doing too much magic/effects, I need to come back to what I was doing when I was "off-line", a set for cards & a set for a mental act. I've purchased some magic books with the govt sending me $1200. It has been a long time since I made any magic buys.

In some of the books I purchased there are some killer effects in there.

I need to add these slowly to my current sets.

Does anyone here have the same problem? Maybe you don't have a problem and you can work on adding new material to what your currently doing?

Rick-


 

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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #2 
I just start out by playing around with a new item that appeals to me. After a short while, I'll find out if it's something I want to add to my working repertoire. If it is, I'll work to really solidify it so that I don't have to think as I execute the sequence of moves. Then I'll work on a presentation. It could be a tight script or a loose concept. At some point, I'll try it out during a set. It will likely feel a bit uncomfortable since I'm not used to performing it for real people. It will become progressively more comfortable as you continue to use it. 

Clearly, if it's not getting the reaction you're looking for, you'll either drop it or tweak it. If you're lucky, it will kill the first time you use it.

Mike
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #3 
Magicians, like anyone else, differ in their inherent abilities. Some know a few tricks, some know hundreds. If you feel it is getting to be a bit much, then listen to your gut.

Be honest about your repertoire. If these new, killer tricks are that much better, perhaps it is time to retire some existing effects.
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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #4 
i have a set of tricks i do on occasions when i perform. I also like to learn a lot.
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James Chartier

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Reply with quote  #5 
I am constantly reading and learning new thoughts, items, tips, etc...I don't believe that you can learn too much.  You never know, that little tid-bit you read or learned and save you when your in a jam...also if you feel that you are doing / practicing too much, a fun project is working on the same effect using different methods and presentations for various groups.  Just have fun.  Interesting post.

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TheAmazingStanley

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Reply with quote  #6 
I don’t have a set or an act right now. For now I’m still trying to get up the courage to show a trick to a stranger. So it’s not a matter of what I can work in to a professional presentation, but I do feel sometimes like I am reaching a point of trying to learn to much too fast. I’m sitting here fumbling through attempts at a Zarrow shuffle wondering, how is it possible to do this without being caught? It’s beyond my skills at this point...which is exactly why I am tackling it.

But I’m still getting my lifts, controls, steals, changes, the more basic stuff I can “do”, perfected. So on the one hand I can do a killer strike double, but I don’t always hit it. So I spend hours practicing that. Every time my hands are free I pick up a deck and start, flip flip flip. And then I wonder, if I spent some of that time on my Zarrow shuffle, maybe I’d have that close to presentable.

I guess this is part of the challenge of any art form, to both strengthen your foundations and and get off Plymouth Rock. As they say, if this was easy everyone would be doing it.

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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #7 
Learning tricks and sleights is fun 😀 it's a creative pursuit and I enjoy the challenge of creating on the fly... I no longer need to create an act..These days I just enjoy thinking about magic and how to make a connection with people. It's fun to take a set of cards and jazz - most folk have never seen a magician anyhow so anything'll do the trick.

Where are you performing nowadays Rick?
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John Cowne

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Reply with quote  #8 
I came across this quote that I’ve seen in many variations, but it seemed to fit this post’s question:

“ I realized that becoming a master of karate was not about learning 4,000 moves but about doing just a handful of moves 4,000 times. —CHET HOLMES, AUTHOR OF THE ULTIMATE SALES MACHINE”.

Of course, it’s not just about practicing a lot, but practicing it right. I can afford to practice various sleights about half an hour a day, so I’ll never be a master, but it’s enough for my situation. How do you manage new skill acquisitions and maintain them in your present stage of life?
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #9 
Practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect. Repeatedly doing a sleight improperly can create muscle memory that is difficult to fix.
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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #10 
“So much time was spent in learning intricate sleights and complex routines that a great many students of the art never got around to the fundamental business of doing magic, let alone presenting their wares in an entertaining style” – Walter B. Gibson
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Socrates
“So much time was spent in learning intricate sleights and complex routines that a great many students of the art never got around to the fundamental business of doing magic, let alone presenting their wares in an entertaining style” – Walter B. Gibson


I think this can be the case with some. Their passion to learn 6 passes and multiple bottom deals end up in a pursuit that obscures why they began in the first place.

But, and there's always a but, some don't really have performing as a goal. They are hobbyists or perhaps just fans of magic and are content exploring on their own. I knew one such magician. In all the years I knew him he never did a trick for me though he was a true magic scholar.

Magic has room for all sorts.
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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #12 
Yes there are always exceptions but in this case the original post was referring to adding material to current sets, and the Walter B Gibson quote echoed the thoughts of Chet Holmes posted above - hence my inclusion here.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Socrates
Yes there are always exceptions but in this case the original post was referring to adding material to current sets, and the Walter B Gibson quote echoed the thoughts of Chet Holmes posted above - hence my inclusion here.


Don't get me wrong, the quote was accurate and appropriate. I was simply speaking for those whose motivation varies from the typical magic cat.
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Reply with quote  #14 
All I can add is that I am impatient, which means I hit the frustration barrier fairly quickly when I practice. So, what I do, is that I will lay out 2 or 3 tricks to work on, say my coin routine and my ropes for the Professor's Nightmare, and I cycle through the tricks when I get frustrated, returning to each trick over and over again. I like to add new tricks, or new elements into my practice because it keeps it fun for me. So...coin/rope/coin/rope/ new move for cups and balls/coin/rope/coin/rope. 

Anyway, that's how I roll.

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Paco Nagata

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Reply with quote  #15 
I think that "The Story of David Devant's Eight Tricks" fits perfectly in this thread.
Please, have a look to this David Britland great article from his great blog Cardopolis:

http://cardopolis.blogspot.com/2017/05/the-story-of-david-devants-eight-tricks.html?m=1

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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paco Nagata
I think that "The Story of David Devant's Eight Tricks" fits perfectly in this thread.
Please, have a look to this David Britland great article from his great blog Cardopolis:

http://cardopolis.blogspot.com/2017/05/the-story-of-david-devants-eight-tricks.html?m=1


Thanks for posting that Paco.  Great read and worthy of thought.
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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paco Nagata
I think that "The Story of David Devant's Eight Tricks" fits perfectly in this thread.
Please, have a look to this David Britland great article from his great blog Cardopolis:

http://cardopolis.blogspot.com/2017/05/the-story-of-david-devants-eight-tricks.html?m=1


Jerry Sadowtiz's comment on the Eight-Tricks thing is quite amusing, which makes a change for Sadowitz.

Imagining a conversation with Devant, during which Devant mentions the Eight-Tricks thing, Sadowitz says: "But what do you do when you get a repeat show?"

It's a cartoon strip, drawn by Sadowitz and in the final picture, Devant hits him on the head with a hammer.

I think it's in "The Crimp" somewhere. Wherever, I think it's comical.

It could be in "Pabular," though if it is, it won't be in the Martin Breese collected versions. There's no Sadowitz material in there.
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