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Mind Phantom

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Reply with quote  #1 
To me anyways, there are certain effects that play big using a stacked deck, those routines like Martin Nash's Ovation & Darwin Ortiz's The Ultimate Cardshark and Allan Ackerman's Ackerman's Opener and many other powerhouse enders.
 
The payoff is ending on a strong effect, however, you do have to switch the deck, which may draw some heat. Can you give me sources on how to do a deck switch and where I can find them ? For the above Nash routine the cards go directly into the jacket pocket and switch is made there.

Do you use a deck switch in your set ? How does it go over ? Seated or standing ? I am making any sense lol ?

Best,

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Gareth

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Reply with quote  #2 
I don't have it, but i would imagine that the Giobbi book "The Art of Switching Decks" would be a pretty good resource. I'm sure though the forum may have some cheaper alternatives. 

Having said that if you are changing the deck BETWEEN effects ie before you go into your closer it can be as simple as packet in one pocket and stack out of another during the reaction off-beat between effects.

If you require a switch mid effect much harder as hands are being burnt. I would be confident in doing a switch between effects, wouldn't be during. Timing and attention management would be crucial. Massively strong if successful.

Just my thoughts Logan

Happy New Year.

G
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luigimar

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Reply with quote  #3 
This is another option you have, but it is not cheap...

http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/2810



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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #4 
Shawn Farquhar has an incredibly practical deck switch that I use for my Omni Deck routine. It's so good that it can be used for more than switching a deck. For example, I'll be using it to bring "Fraud" from Daniel Garcia, back into my repertoire. He teaches it in his Penguin lecture.

http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/2677



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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #5 
    Of course there's a much easier solution - in my opinion. Learn great effects/routines that you can do with ANY DECK, ANY TIME. Problem solved!
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JohnnyNewYork

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Reply with quote  #6 
Logan 5 -- if you can openly stack a deck in front of an audience as well as Harry Lorayne or Dani DaOrtiz, as Mr. Lorayne already mentioned, you have no problem.  For me, sometimes in that situation I'll put the cards in my pocket and remove some other prop (for a smaller packet trick requiring special tarot card or something, making the move logical to the viewers).  After I've done the "other trick", I put that prop away (whatever it is) and end with the full deck of cards -- new deck switched in, of course ("I always like to end using a full deck."; the double-entendre typically gets a laugh or two).  Somewhere in Mr. Lorayne's books he reveals a very convincing way to set up a deck into reds and blacks while doing another trick, and I believe Paul Gordon mentioned something similar in his recent Forum lecture.  I am familiar with Farquhar's DS mentioned by Rudy and it is absolutely undetectable with tremendous cover.  Already mentioned, the Giobbi book covers just about everything in this department.  Best wishes in 2017 -- johnny
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #7 
    I taught that red/black setup waaaayyyy back in 1962, in Close-Up Card Magic when I taught my Out of this Universe. And, waaaayyy back in 1972 or thereabouts I first issued my The Great Divide for "separating openly", etc. And more currently, in JAW DROPPERS I discuss setting up "impromptuly" quite a bit.  And, of course, I do, quite often, set what I need as I'm for example looking for the aces. On another thread here I believe Rudy (Tinoco) posted a video of me doing The Card Sharp & The Four Gamblers - which is a good example (I think) of just that. Check it out.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #8 
I saw Giobbi lecture at the Genii convention. This is the first time the deck switch book was available. It was a spiral bound item at that time for $25. We didn't know that the lecture was on deck switching when it started. He had done several effects before he told us the theme. He announced that he had done seven deck switches already. I had not noticed even one!! The deck switch book is solid gold.

One of the classic methods has been mentioned above viz. put deck in pocket; do coin trick; remove new deck; blow minds.

Marlo would leave jokers on the table. He'd put the deck in its case and go to the pocket. Then he'd immediately come out with the cooler and pick up the jokers and put them in the box. He'd then leave the deck on the table. It seemed that he had just forgotten the jokers. No one remembered or noticed that the deck had gone out of sight in the pocket. This a very good method too.

Someone mentioned Shawn Farquhar's method. It is excellent. He taught it at 4F a while back. I think it works best on stage when you have an audience member assisting you. But, as I recall, it can be used any time you're wearing a jacket.

Mike
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tommyellison

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Reply with quote  #9 
I use the Farquhar method to switch the full card box for an empty one in Cannibal card routine. Great method and in most cases the reveal on the table coupled with the reaction of  the spectators provides enormous cover for the exchange.

Happy New Year!

Tommy 

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magicfish

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Reply with quote  #10 
Some of the most devious deck switches I have encountered can be found in Barrie Richardson's three books.
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Mind Phantom

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by luigimar
This is another option you have, but it is not cheap...

http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/2810




Luis,

I like it! I'll have to save my pennies for it however.

Thanks to all who have shared with me your ideas and sources for the deck switch.

Best,


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Stevie Ray

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Reply with quote  #12 

Roberto Giobbi's Art of Switching Decks is keenly researched and well organized. You'll find plenty of technique, inspiration and reference within. He indexes each method on a chart so one can easily find the appropriate switch for ploys seated or standing, with or without a coat, in the middle of an effect or--most commonly--on the offbeat. Mr. Giobbi includes a chapter briefly describing previously published sources and marketed mechanical devices.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
I saw Giobbi lecture at the Genii convention. This is the first time the deck switch book was available... We didn't know that the lecture was on deck switching when it started. He had done several effects before he told us the theme. He announced that he had done seven deck switches already. I had not noticed even one!! The deck switch book is solid gold.Mike

 

The book comes with a DVD that features raw footage of that 2012 Genii lecture. In print, Mr. Giobbi apologizes for the poor quality of the video, as it was never intended for public release. Even so, it is a fine companion for the book and—as Mike Powers attests— living proof that properly executed switches can fool even the most astute audience.

 

The Art of Switching Decks predates Gregory Wilson’s release of Cold Case, a sturdy gimmick that provides good cover similar to Mr. Engblom’s more complex Cooler and Shin Lim’s Flash (A magic utility titled "Flash"... rather like Ford introducing a new model called "The Crash"). 

 

Mr. Wilson’s Cold Case has no moving parts and comes with access to a three hour instructional video. The gimmick can be easily disguised to match any brand of card case. A table is required and—as with the majority of switches—offbeat is essential.
 It is not until the final minutes that Greg demonstrates Daniel Madison’s handling born from a similar idea. While the differences are subtle, Mr. Madison’s move is the one I prefer.

 

Lastly, Harry and Johnny’s posts on this topic are important. Before one incorporates a deck switch into an act, it’s important spend time contemplating practical alternatives. Harry’s Great Divide is a seemingly innocent way to gather or separate cards under the offbeat auspices of “toying” with the deck. Learning to cull is liberating, not only for the purposes of assembling a simple stack FASIDU, the cull has saved my skin more times than I care to recall! If one’s intent is to ring in (or ditch) an Invisible Deck, check out Paul Harris’ excellent impromptu Invisible Rising Card from Las Vegas Close Up. Darwin Ortiz’ Lucky Deck from At The Card Table sends the Mental Photography deck to the bottom of the drawer. While the best solution may still lead to a full deck switch, the exercise of weighing alternatives often leads to richer magical thinking.

 


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Gerald Deutsch

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Reply with quote  #13 
I posted a Perverse Magic effect based on Norman Houghton's "A Study In Frustration" on the Perverse Magic thread of the Genii Forum back on January 2, 2003.

You have a spectator take any 51 cards and you will find them all and you keep getting the one card they didn't select.

To end you leave that one card out of the deck and you ask for another card and when you try to get it it's found to have no face - just backs on both sides. Then, the entire deck - which had been handled by the spectator is found to your frustation to have only backs.

It has to be the closing - what can you do with a deck with no faces?
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Bulla

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Reply with quote  #14 
I've always liked Simon Lovell's effect Packed Wallet as a simple and effective way to switch decks in the middle of a performance.
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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerald Deutsch
I posted a Perverse Magic effect based on Norman Houghton's "A Study In Frustration" on the Perverse Magic thread of the Genii Forum back on January 2, 2003.

You have a spectator take any 51 cards and you will find them all and you keep getting the one card they didn't select.

To end you leave that one card out of the deck and you ask for another card and when you try to get it it's found to have no face - just backs on both sides. Then, the entire deck - which had been handled by the spectator is found to your frustation to have only backs.

It has to be the closing - what can you do with a deck with no faces?


Jerry, I love your approach to magic and appreciate how you freely share your ideas with us. We're blessed to have you here!

Happy New Year!

Rudy

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culldavid

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Reply with quote  #16 
In one of the Vernon inner secrets card books there is a very easy way of pulling out a chosen card from the inside jacket pocket,this is done while still holding the deck in hand,so no palming,and is very effective in certain circumstances,in a gambling routine I used to do I used this method,at the same time switching the deck.The patter line was abt the card sharp hiding the ace's in his pockets
This Vernon method of pulling out the card from the inside jkt pocket can be even more effective if at the same time you pull out a (palmed) card from the other jkt pocket,thus you have an excuse for holding the deck in one hand,
I believe Alex Elmsley had a similar way of switching a deck which I think is explained in one of his collected works books.
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Mind Phantom

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers


Marlo would leave jokers on the table. He'd put the deck in its case and go to the pocket. Then he'd immediately come out with the cooler and pick up the jokers and put them in the box. He'd then leave the deck on the table. It seemed that he had just forgotten the jokers. No one remembered or noticed that the deck had gone out of sight in the pocket. This a very good method too.



Mike,

Thank you I am going to try this with Nash's Ovation, simple & bold..I like it. I also think it's important to do a effect with the cooler without messing up the stacked deck. I can do Vernon's step-peek and divination which leaves the cooler intact. You can find it in the book Peeked Performances by Richard Busch.

That way they will totally forget that you went to your pocket.

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Dave

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Reply with quote  #18 
Derek Dingle's "Two Fisted Deck Switch" (Page 198 of The Complete Works) is extremely effective.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #19 
I agree with Mike Powers' recommendation of using your pocket.  Are you going to be standing typically?  If not, seated deck switches are easy peasy.  Just "go south" with the pack, drop and grab the "cooler".  Done in a flash, with misdirection, they will never remember the deck going out of sight.  Do it on the offbeat.

Standing, it is a matter of acting.  If you absentmindedly put the pack into your pocket and then immediately take it out as if you "forgot" something, it will go unnoticed.  Generally, anything you don't pay much attention to, they won't either.  So the jokers example Mr. Powers referenced is good, providing motivation.  

You are likely doing a ton of "moves" in your set.  No need in my opinion to add a complicated deck switch to the mix.

If you are worried about speed or getting hung up in your pocket, there are ways around that.  Nothing would tip what you are doing more than rooting around to find the other deck.  So it has to be quick and you cannot show any thought.  This is where your creativity can shine.
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Mats Kjellstrom

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Reply with quote  #20 
Check out Simon Aronson´s "easy" deck switch in his fantastic routine Shuffle Tracking.
I have done this effect many times and its a true fooler.


You can learn the amazing routine/deck switch - Shuffle Tracking in this DVD:

http://simonaronson.com/volume3.html

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Steven Youell

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Reply with quote  #21 
I have personal experience with The Ultimate Cardshark, which requires a deck switch.

In general, the way to do a deck switch, IMO, is to use the SECOND TO LAST trick
to set up the deck switch.

This is NOT ideal, but one way I used to switch decks is to do something that destroyed
the a card(s) deck I was working with, thus necessitating a new deck for the last and final miracle.
This can be done with having several cards signed, a Card Warp Interlude, etc.

Another ruse that can strengthen a deck switch is to do an earlier routine in which a card is
signed (let's say the 9S). Remove the 9S from the Cooler and add it in at the same exact time
you switch decks. During the final routine, they audience will see the signed card and lock in
the suggestion that it's the same deck.

I have notes about this stuff somewhere, if that's not helpful...

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Claudio

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mats Kjellstrom
Check out Simon Aronson´s "easy" deck switch in his fantastic routine Shuffle Tracking.
I have done this effect many times and its a true fooler.


You can learn the amazing routine/deck switch - Shuffle Tracking in this DVD:

http://simonaronson.com/volume3.html

I second Mats's recommendation. If you're unfamiliar with Shuffle Tracking, you can read it here.
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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #23 
In reading this thread, I really like the Marlo's ruse with the jokers that Mike Powers mentioned. 
Combine that with Steven Youell's ruse of destroying cards and have those missing from the cooler and I think I have a winner. 

But, for those that need more, a friend of mine also highly recommends Giobbi's book 'The Art of Switching Decks." 

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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #24 
My "audition" performance for joining the Vancouver Magic Circle (25 years ago!  Tempus fugit!) used a fairly simple deck switch:  after performing some card magic I boxed the deck and started to tell a story about ... well, I can't remember what ... as I searched my pockets for the piece of rope needed for the next routine.  The sequence was this:
      1.   Card box in right hand, goes into inner left pocket of my jacket, comes out still holding the "same" card box.  Mild acting showing dissatisfaction.
      2.   Card box is tossed casually on the table as right hand holds open right side of the jacket and left hand goes into right inner pocket, finding the rope.
      3.   After the rope routine, pick up the card box and do the stacked-deck closer.

The goal was to give the impression that the deck never left their sight.  I didn't conduct a survey to find out if it was effective, but several members of the audience commented later that they were very impressed by my ability to cull the cards I needed for the closer ... which suggests that the ruse was successful.
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