Sign up Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Bill Guinee

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 271
Reply with quote  #1 
A recent Hidden Brain (NPR Podcast) had an excellent recording concerning the reasons that people like surprise endings and how the brain fools us and surprises us. I thought it was great, and obviously relevant for magicians. Here is a link: https://www.npr.org/2019/12/18/789441553/spoiler-alert-the-psychology-of-surprise-endings. I hope you enjoy it.
0
chris w

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 646
Reply with quote  #2 
That was interesting, Bill. Thanks for sharing.

I find that, even today, people seldom expect it when I end my performances by revealing that I've been dead the whole time.
0
Mike Powers

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,550
Reply with quote  #3 
The Hidden Brain is a great podcast. I'm always fascinated by the content. I catch it on NPR.

Mike
0
Anthony Vinson

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,150
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris w
That was interesting, Bill. Thanks for sharing.

I find that, even today, people seldom expect it when I end my performances by revealing that I've been dead the whole time.


My kind of humor: deadpan!

Av
0
RayJ

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,006
Reply with quote  #5 
Very interesting podcast.  Thanks for sharing it Bill!  There are many on this forum that have posted about psychology and magic and for good reason, because magic happens in the mind.

The page on which the podcast was linked had some verbiage and some sources listed.  I think this one would be good for anyone wanting to do a deeper dive into how magic specifically relates to psychological principals.

"Attention and awareness in stage magic: turning tricks into research," by Stephen L. Macknik, Mac King, James Randi, Apollo Robbins, Teller, John Thompson, and Susana Martinez-Conde in Nature Reviews Neuroscience

Psychological priciples of prestidigation.  There we go again.  Even if one is silent.
0
RayJ

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,006
Reply with quote  #6 
I copied this from the same page Bill G. linked to.  I assume there is no problem in doing that.  I think it would be interesting to take the 5 listed points and see how they might affect your magic.  Can you take advantage of one or more of these biases in order to strengthen an audiences reaction?  You surely are whether you know it or not, but knowing WHY might allow you to uncap hidden potential and maximize reactions.

  • The Curse of Knowledge: The mother of all blind spots, this is the tendency to assume that others know what you know.
  • Confirmation Bias: The tendency to seek information that confirms what you already believe.
  • Anchoring: The tendency to lean too heavily on the first piece of information you hear, failing to correct it as you learn new data.
  • Availability Bias: The tendency to believe that things that spring readily to mind are more plausible than things that spring less readily to mind.
  • Hindsight Bias: The tendency to see an event as predictable, once it has already unfolded. We experience hindsight bias when we look back and say, "I knew it all along."
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.