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Jason Ladanye

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New blog is up. Here are my thoughts on scripting your magic. Do you script or just wing it?

https://www.cardmagicbyjason.com/scripting-your-magic/

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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #2 
I agree. I like to rehearse out loud, because like you said, we don't write like we talk. And it's fun.
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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Jason, that is a great question. I find that I’m thinking about it more often these days. I have to admit that for the most part, I tend to wing it.

While I am convinced that the people who I perform for are entertained and puzzled, I’m not sure that my magic is as good as what it could/should be if I took the time to script out a thoughtful presentation. I look forward to reading your blog and your thoughts on the subject.

I hope that all is well with you.

Rudy

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Mind Phantom

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Reply with quote  #4 
Does a rocket scientist wing it?
Does the guy who does brain surgery wing it?

No. they follow a script. In my sales business I plan on following a script  ( when i get licensed ).

Why should performing magic be any different? I would bet most of the pros in any profession use some kind of script or, pattern that they go by.

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Harry Lorayne

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     I always found - decades ago - that when I tried to script a routine - that was BAD. Why? Because when I started to perform an effect/routine I'd just "go" with what came naturally - to me anyway. And, as time when by, as I continued to perform that particular thing I'd change/add according to my new familiarity/experience with it. 

     When I scripted - I eventually realized - it "held me" to that script which kept me specifically with that. That simply is not my kind of thing. Things always changed slightly according to audience I was performing for. I doubt if I've explained myself correctly...and anyway, that's just what "works" for me - not necessarily/not probably for you! Point, I guess, is - I automatically "scripted" when I started to do a particular effect/routine - without writing it or particularly trying to memorize it. I just went "naturally.'Well, as usual - to each his own.
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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #6 
Idon't write out a script like a playwright, I just think of something while I practice and that's what I go with. Some of them have gone through changes along the way. Part of the fun.
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #7 
   I think that's what I was trying to say!
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Jason Ladanye

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Yes, I am scripted. However, to your points, those scripts are never ending. I'm just writing out what you folks are memorizing. Some performances yield great little moments that I'll add into a script. As you said Harry, to each his own😉

Sometimes I "retire" an effect for 2-3 years and it's nice to have a polished script to come back to. 
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Amazer

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Some of the most entertaining or funny acts, monologues, etc., seem entirely off the cuff. I believe that in most cases, these performances are scripted. At the very least, there was a framework developed and at least partially populated with key words and ideas.

For me, scripting of magic is very important, and instrumental in achieving the experience I'm going for for the spectator. Rather than a rote script, I do like to keep the framework/key words as required in the performance, while allowing for some level of customization or "winging it", based on the audience temperament, sophistication, level of energy, etc.

It's been referenced in probably all discussions on this subject, but I'll mention it anyway - you should read the book 'Scripting Magic" if you want some excellent insight and motivation for doing the work of making your words support and enhance the magic.

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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #10 
Performance is a whole other thing than scripting. You don't want to come across as though you are reciting a memorized script. Keeping it fresh and natural is most important. Woah.
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MagicBrian

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Reply with quote  #11 
I have recently begun to try to script my routines in earnest and I can honestly say I think it depends upon the piece for me. Some of the routines I do, I relax and just enjoy the routine because I have set into my script. I know what I'm supposed to say, so I'm not really having to pull double-duty and try to find words as I do the routines. On the other hand, some of my routines seem too stilted if I script them too much because they rely on my interaction with the audience. I have started doing a bare-bones script of my most used routines, while intricately scripting those routines that rely on it (mostly my mentalism routines). 

I have read Scripting Magic and I have to say that book opened my eyes to the potential of scripting and is the main motivation to why I'm scripting so much now instead of winging it. I still do a lot of "off the cuff" magic, but there are times when I just don't want to forget to bring out some important joke or point. 

So for me, I guess it depends upon the effect.

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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #12 
The most valuable part of scripting, for me, is eliminating a lot of extraneous words. Most of us, when we just have a vague notion of what we want to say, start babbling at some point. I even see this in well known magicians on TV. They hadn't given any thought as to how to phrase things in an unambiguous way with an economy of words. In the end, I'm not going word for word from the script. But I have, through repetition, economized the wording and, hopefully, eliminated ambiguity. 

After using the script in the "real world" I generally discover flaws. If a spectator fails to completely understand what I want him/her to do, that's on me. I need to reword how I describe what I'm asking them to do. So a script is always a "work in progress."

I just helped my wife rewrite a script she'll be using in her show at a magic convention in Bolivia in December. She's good at creating vivid descriptions. These are good for creative writing, but are too wordy for a script. I was able to eliminate a load of extraneous wording.

Mike
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Bmat

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Reply with quote  #13 
I believe it was the Ad lib king himself, Robin Williams who once said, "I've been practicing my Add libs for years"  The point being that a script is always good, never really a great idea to throw untested material into a routine, however said script really doesn't need to be written down.  As pointed out on other posts, performing is fluid, always changing we must react and act with the audience in front of us.  We must be able to adapt on the fly.   have a basic structure but don't become so ridged in that structure. 
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #14 
For sure you have to be able to drop out of the script and back in. Playing off of situations that arise is very important.

I'd interpret "I've been practicing my ad libs for years" to mean that they're really not spontaneous. They've been honed over years of practice.

Stand-up comedy is a great example of an environment where things seem spontaneous but aren't. Read Jay Sankey's "Zen and the Art of Stand-Up Comedy." Comedians are always looking for ways to leave words out and still get to the same place. Sankey uses an example something like this:

"I was walking down the street thinking that I was in need of some food. Then I saw the sign - Louie's. I went in....."

He contrast this with him miming walking along a couple of steps. Then he looks up as though to see the sign above the door. He say, "Louie's!" and then acts like he's walking in. One word and some miming as opposed to 23 words, most of which were unnecessary.

He also talks in the book about trying out a joke and having it bomb but feeling that it should have worked. He explains that stand-up comics will likely try re-writing the joke and trying it again. If it still fails, you don't give up. Try it another way. He explained that this process would go on a long ways before actually giving up on the joke. Generally, if the comic really felt that there was something there, he/she'd eventually find the path to the laughs. In many cases the exact wording was very important for success.

Mike
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Bmat

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
For sure you have to be able to drop out of the script and back in. Playing off of situations that arise is very important.

I'd interpret "I've been practicing my ad libs for years" to mean that they're really not spontaneous. They've been honed over years of practice.

Stand-up comedy is a great example of an environment where things seem spontaneous but aren't. Read Jay Sankey's "Zen and the Art of Stand-Up Comedy." Comedians are always looking for ways to leave words out and still get to the same place. Sankey uses an example something like this:

"I was walking down the street thinking that I was in need of some food. Then I saw the sign - Louie's. I went in....."

He contrast this with him miming walking along a couple of steps. Then he looks up as though to see the sign above the door. He say, "Louie's!" and then acts like he's walking in. One word and some miming as opposed to 23 words, most of which were unnecessary.

He also talks in the book about trying out a joke and having it bomb but feeling that it should have worked. He explains that stand-up comics will likely try re-writing the joke and trying it again. If it still fails, you don't give up. Try it another way. He explained that this process would go on a long ways before actually giving up on the joke. Generally, if the comic really felt that there was something there, he/she'd eventually find the path to the laughs. In many cases the exact wording was very important for success.

Mike


Willams also said he would never try new material in front of a large audience,  everything is tried in smaller venues until they work.  And your interpretation is spot on.  

The genius of Robin Williams is that a situation could arise and he could fly through the filing cabinet in his brain and come up with the proper response,  honed a ready to go. 

David Copperfield, (whom I think is great) makes situations appear to be spontaneous so he could ad lib, but his shows really don't work that way.   See the same show a few times and you realize there is always a lady in the front row with binoculars so he can take them and look at the lady through them and say, "see how it feels?"  or the bit with the baby crying.  It is amazing how many times that baby cries and the exact same time in the show.  And it is brilliant.

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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #16 
Yes. The feeling of spontaneity is very important.

I read that comics cringed when Robin W came to see them at an open mic or doing a show. His brain would log their material and it would pop out when he was on Jay Leno etc. He wasn't intending to rip off people's material (a REAL no no in comedy). His stream of consciousness approach just caused jokes and bits to pop out. 

Mike
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ianmcrawford

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Reply with quote  #17 
For me scripting is as important as learning a new move.. in Strong Magic, pgs 244 to 259 Darwin Ortiz,lays down a fantastic argument for the value, and importance of scripting. Go ahead, actually read Ortiz, it’s a brilliant thesis, and you’ll be convinced.
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RayJ

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Two Saturdays ago the subject of scripting your magic came up for discussion.  There was a lot of good stuff shared by a host of people.  If you haven't, I think it would be good to read through this thread and perhaps add to it, or perhaps update it, with your experiences or reflections on the subject.

I am in the "pro-scripting camp", with a few caveats.  One of the posts above, from Bmat, recalls a comment made by Robin Williams.  Comedians and magicians share a lot in common whether the magician is trying to be funny or not.  There are similarities in the performance, the presentation.  Each performer's routine has a beginning, a middle and an end.  Each performer's set should begin with something engaging and end on a high note.  The comparisons go on and on.

My caveat to the idea of scripting is that I always leave room for interaction specific to the audience.  This may be discussion centered around their company if it is a corporate event.  Or it might be discussion about current events.  I also am listening to them as I'm performing.  That is another reason to work to a script.  At least for me it helps me free up my attention to focus on the audience.  But take care that you don't become "robotic".  Even if you say the same thing at the same time every time, make it sound fresh.  By being able to hear the audiences reactions, you can then play off of comments if it is appropriate.  Craig pointed this out during the Saturday session and he was right.  Take advantage when something happens, it might be far more entertaining than what you had planned!

In the end I probably have 80 to 90% of what I'm going to do scripted.  The remaining time I treat like a jazz performance, ebbing and flowing with the crowd.  If they seem to be digging it, I may add an additional phase to Ambitious Card for example.  But if I detect they aren't "into it", then I won't.  

Think back to performances by some of your favorite magicians.  Can you tell which ones obviously script versus the ones that don't?  And the ones that did script, were they still reactive?  Did it seem spontaneous, even if it wasn't?
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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ

My caveat to the idea of scripting is that I always leave room for interaction specific to the audience.

Indeed.

I often say to spectators, "This isn't a trick, this is a journey". Always tongue in cheek.

But it's true. Set off for work, or the shops, on a familiar route and although it’s the same, it’s always different. Sometimes the traffic’s light, sometimes the traffic lights are with us. Mostly it’s mix of the two. We take it in our stride and adjust. If there’s a diversion, roadworks, or escaped tiger, we not only divert, but our local knowledge kicks in and we modify our routine.

If we’re too busy delivering a speech, we exclude the audience. Magic breaks the fourth wall, so leave let’s it broke and listen. Even hecklers unintentionally offer gold once in a while.

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X

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Reply with quote  #20 

My take is heavily inspired by Paul Harris thoughts on the "Moment Of Astonishment" the rest doesn't matter, only the moment of astonishment is the real impact... a very minimalists focus on the impact versus the fluff and long boring stories "patter"



the thing about scripting, is I feel a lot of magicians overlook appearing as if you have a set choreographed "trick" that you have practiced and perfected that is always going to arrive at a certain place, it leaves out the actual "magic"

there is a "freedom" that is missing from a lot of magicians, which is why I always say the only rule of magic/mentalism is there are no rules because a lot of people explain magic as "setup, patter, *secret methods* result and it feels very, scripted and pre-destined to always arrive at this place, confined to the "rules of magic" or performing in ways that it should be done

you can have a practiced 100% routine and still appear as if everything is happening off the cuff.

also, I feel with pre-scripting people don't focus on the atmosphere that you are performing, everyone is different, not everyone will be interested in the same "story" not everyone will react to the same "direction" many people leave out the importance of using your surrounding to your advantage, "natural directions" 

we practice in front of a mirror, a camera, we block out angles, and in a real-world situation many ignore any 'natural-misdirection/direction"  they miss the natural interactions with the audience, the moments when you can extend a routine and take it to new places, or use objects, and "natural things" to your advantage 

in the end, there are a lot of performers who forget about the actual Magic/Mentalis and focus only on the story, scripting, "patter" etc and the magic is just along for the ride, an afterthought 

Daniel Garcia told me once "everyone should have multiple routines that are under 30 seconds" 


apologies if the structure of this comment is off, I know my English grammar is not very good still, also work in progress 



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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by X

My take is heavily inspired by Paul Harris thoughts on the "Moment Of Astonishment" the rest doesn't matter, only the moment of astonishment is the real impact... a very minimalists focus on the impact versus the fluff and long boring stories "patter"



the thing about scripting, is I feel a lot of magicians overlook appearing as if you have a set choreographed "trick" that you have practiced and perfected that is always going to arrive at a certain place, it leaves out the actual "magic"

there is a "freedom" that is missing from a lot of magicians, which is why I always say the only rule of magic/mentalism is there are no rules because a lot of people explain magic as "setup, patter, *secret methods* result and it feels very, scripted and pre-destined to always arrive at this place, confined to the "rules of magic" or performing in ways that it should be done

you can have a practiced 100% routine and still appear as if everything is happening off the cuff.

also, I feel with pre-scripting people don't focus on the atmosphere that you are performing, everyone is different, not everyone will be interested in the same "story" not everyone will react to the same "direction" many people leave out the importance of using your surrounding to your advantage, "natural directions" 

we practice in front of a mirror, a camera, we block out angles, and in a real-world situation many ignore any 'natural-misdirection/direction"  they miss the natural interactions with the audience, the moments when you can extend a routine and take it to new places, or use objects, and "natural things" to your advantage 

in the end, there are a lot of performers who forget about the actual Magic/Mentalis and focus only on the story, scripting, "patter" etc and the magic is just along for the ride, an afterthought 

Daniel Garcia told me once "everyone should have multiple routines that are under 30 seconds" 


apologies if the structure of this comment is off, I know my English grammar is not very good still, also work in progress 




X, you expressed yourself very well.  John Mendoza made a similar comment regarding card tricks.  He basically said that unless the trick is really, really good or the story extremely compelling, it better be over in less than 45 seconds.
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John Cowne

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Reply with quote  #22 
From Ray: “ Think back to performances by some of your favorite magicians. Can you tell which ones obviously script versus the ones that don't? And the ones that did script, were they still reactive? Did it seem spontaneous, even if it wasn't?”
Could this be a little like identifying the world’s best criminal - by definition, he/she will never be known? I think I could have a good crack at guessing who doesn’t. Perhaps the really good ‘scriptists’ could only be identified by seeing repeat performances (unless they are REALLY on the ball and have different scripts for different audiences; everything ‘changes’ when a particular kind of heckler is put into the equation). As I muse on this, it seems there are great plusses for a strongly scripted routine, which includes a flexibility that comes out of further experience. So, could a lesson be ‘practice until you don’t need to’? So, how are you guys filling in your days now?
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arthur stead

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Reply with quote  #23 

Here are my thoughts on scripting:  You wouldn’t do a trick for someone unless you were comfortable with the sleights, would you?  (Although sadly, I’ve met a number of people who do that).  But surely, someone who takes our art seriously, would practice and rehearse those sleights until they become second nature, before attempting to use them in a routine.

The same can be said for your patter.  If you’re just going to “wing it”, it leads to awkward moments, repeated phrases, and lots of “ums”.  And very often, unimaginative conversation.  

However, if you’ve taken the time to put together a solid story-line prior to any performances, your patter will be fluid and you won’t hesitate.  And then, once you’re comfortable with your scripted patter, in every new performance you can gradually deviate and improvise and be spontaneous, because you already have the script as a foundation.  Then, also, your patter will evolve with each new performing experience, based on your own sense of growing confidence, your audience’s reactions, realizing when to alter your timing, and any new ideas which crop up along the way.



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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arthur stead

Here are my thoughts on scripting:  You wouldn’t do a trick for someone unless you were comfortable with the sleights, would you?  (Although sadly, I’ve met a number of people who do that).  But surely, someone who takes our art seriously, would practice and rehearse those sleights until they become second nature, before attempting to use them in a routine.

The same can be said for your patter.  If you’re just going to “wing it”, it leads to awkward moments, repeated phrases, and lots of “ums”.  And very often, unimaginative conversation.  

However, if you’ve taken the time to put together a solid story-line prior to any performances, your patter will be fluid and you won’t hesitate.  And then, once you’re comfortable with your scripted patter, in every new performance you can gradually deviate and improvise and be spontaneous, because you already have the script as a foundation.  Then, also, your patter will evolve with each new performing experience, based on your own sense of growing confidence, your audience’s reactions, realizing when to alter your timing, and any new ideas which crop up along the way.




I agree about using a story-line. An example is Paul Gertner's cups and balls. I can recite portions of it because it is pretty much the same each time. His delivery is excellent though so it doesn't sound "canned".
Vernon's cups patter was pretty well scripted as well, but more explanatory and less storyish.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Cowne
From Ray: “ Think back to performances by some of your favorite magicians. Can you tell which ones obviously script versus the ones that don't? And the ones that did script, were they still reactive? Did it seem spontaneous, even if it wasn't?”
Could this be a little like identifying the world’s best criminal - by definition, he/she will never be known? I think I could have a good crack at guessing who doesn’t. Perhaps the really good ‘scriptists’ could only be identified by seeing repeat performances (unless they are REALLY on the ball and have different scripts for different audiences; everything ‘changes’ when a particular kind of heckler is put into the equation). As I muse on this, it seems there are great plusses for a strongly scripted routine, which includes a flexibility that comes out of further experience. So, could a lesson be ‘practice until you don’t need to’? So, how are you guys filling in your days now?


Magicians are subject to the same fates as any performer, i.e. Mishaps, hecklers, power outages, etc. So yes, there are times you need to audible, think on your feet. But just like Robin Williams, it helps to have rehearsed "bits" to fall back on.

Have a rehearsed patter and be flexible when it is advantageous or necessary.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #26 
Most actors follow scripts.  Some, because of their abiity or reputation are allowed to ad-lib.  In magic, those who follow scripts (meaning spoken word) have to be good in their delivery, to make it sound natural.  I've known some trade show magicians that confessed they got so burned out at times, they were happy to just go through the motions and it probably was noticeable in their delivery.  One thing that helps me is to make eye contact with certain people as I perform.  Generally that is someone fairly close, probably those that are helping select cards, etc.  But sometimes I make sure to make contact with people farther away.  It helps to draw them into the performance.  Imagine sitting in the back, being ignored by the performer.  It makes it easier to get distracted and not pay proper attention.  So don't forget the folks in the "cheap seats".  By bringing them in, you drag a lot of the others with them.  Cast a wide net.
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Reply with quote  #27 
Personally, I think that the lack of scripting among magicians accounts for an awful lot of the terrible performances we see. Many seem to think that learning the moves is something worth practicing tirelessly but that presentation is a thing of genius, something that doesn't require actual work, something that just springs forth from our mouths, and gestures arise fully born and realized. Although few would consciously admit that they thought the only thing important in magic was the sleights and gaffs, too many of us act that way. In my opinion, the reverse is true - what is most important is the presentation, and good presentation takes as much or more effort and work as learning the moves.

During most of the magic that I see performed, the patter (clearly not scripted) devolves to simple description: "now I am doing this, and now I am doing that." Of course, this is what happens if all that one has paid attention to prior to the performance is the moves. This tendency to think the moves the most important thing is rampant especially in online performance - think how many videos of tricks that you have seen in which the only things visible are the performers' hands and the props. Obviously the rest of the body, the facial expressions, etc. don't matter at all to the magic. And if the performance is for other magicians, it is even worse. We don't do the presentation at all.

I hope this doesn't insult anyone, but magic that is just about the tricks is boring; I want entertainment, drama, even magic.

Often, the excuse that "I don't want to seem stilted" is either simple laziness or a bizarre preconception that has never been tested by the magician. Would Hamlet be a better play if the words had never been written down and the actors just knew when the ghost would come in, what would happen in the sword fight, and so forth? Magic should be a form of theater. Knowing the patter cold actually allows you to be able to adapt to an audience without fumbling. It is one less thing you have to be making up in the moment, so you can be more present.

Another misconception is that a script will not sound like genuine spoken language. If one is not a good dramatic writer there is a simple fix. Improvise your speech during rehearsal (which is different from practice primarily in that it involves speaking the patter out loud). Improvise it again and again, and once it starts getting better, write it down. Then, you can edit it, find even better words, cut redundancies, and go back to rehearsing again.

Now I admit this takes a long time. If you just want to show your spouse and friends a new trick every day and all you have time to do is remember the order of the sleights, then this is impossible. But, I think it is ludicrous to try to argue that less preparation for performance is better than more.
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Reply with quote  #28 
I like the idea of scripting, especially when putting together a show.  However, I mostly do it just to help me remember the overall flow of the lines and jokes and entertainment bits that I want to include... the general flow. 

The one thing that bugs me about watching some people who have scripted performances is if they get an interruption, or they stumble a little, they go through (sometimes even repeat the last few words) as if reading from note cards.  Like Ray mentioned, it sounds and feels robotic...  like, "this-is-what-I-must-say...".  Of course, there are routines that flow best with a specific story line, like Brother John Hamman's "The Twins" (and many other effects), but if you can allow for flexibility or a slight twist on the story line with each audience, it will feel almost impromptu and fresh for them as well as you.

Tom

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Bill Guinee

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Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Kracker

The one thing that bugs me about watching some people who have scripted performances is if they get an interruption, or they stumble a little, they go through (sometimes even repeat the last few words) as if reading from note cards.  Like Ray mentioned, it sounds and feels robotic...  like, "this-is-what-I-must-say...".  
Tom


It has been my experience that actors (including magicians) who stumble through like this and cling to their lines have a significant problem. However, it is very rare that the problem is having a script. Rather, it is almost always a lack of sufficient familiarity with the script. When the script becomes as automatic as most of us try to make the moves, this kind of problem rarely occurs. It is so natural that it becomes easy to improvise and adapt within the script. I am sure that you can imagine a magician who did not know the sleights or procedures well enough and who stumble, seem to have trouble remembering what to do next, and seem overly focused on what to do next with their hands. We would never consider arguing that they needed to give up having a set sequence of sleights and methods. Rather we would argue that they needed more practice.
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Tom G

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Reply with quote  #30 
Bill's correct, having a script is one thing, being able to present the effect as not being scripted is another.   Simon Lovell showed me his scripts which were very detailed.  He even had drawings of where he'd be in the trick at point of the script. And he was someone you'd think just winged it as he went.  He could definitely head off on a tangent and return with out missing a beat.  I do agree with a lot of X's points, some who try to weave stories are not storytellers.  I've spoke to Paul
a lot about the "Moment of Astonishment" and like X stated  that moment can get lost in a whole lot of talk.  Some performers have a natural charisma and can hold peoples attention, which is great if you have it. 
 
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #31 
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Originally Posted by Tom G
Bill's correct, having a script is one thing, being able to present the effect as not being scripted is another.   Simon Lovell showed me his scripts which were very detailed.  He even had drawings of where he'd be in the trick at point of the script. And he was someone you'd think just winged it as he went.  He could definitely head off on a tangent and return with out missing a beat.  I do agree with a lot of X's points, some who try to weave stories are not storytellers.  I've spoke to Paul
a lot about the "Moment of Astonishment" and like X stated  that moment can get lost in a whole lot of talk.  Some performers have a natural charisma and can hold peoples attention, which is great if you have it. 
 


Rehearsing blocking and the use of storyboards is as applicable to magic as it is to acting. After all, aren't we merely actors playing the role?

I really liked Richard Kaufman's illustrations. He was a pioneer in helping the reader understand motion.
Too many illustrations showed static positions, but failed to help us understand how to get there and where to go next.

It's been said here before but Slydini left nothing to chance, rehearsing every posture, turn, lean to enhance his magic.

Ideally, aspiring magicians should take instruction in theater, acting and dance. Music too.
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Reply with quote  #32 
The Henning Nelms book encourages utilizing a script.... and it is definitely a good idea to create a scripted presentation.  Another important concept is considering what it is you wish to convey whilst performing,, for example is it a display of skill perhaps showing how the con-artist swindles you out of your hard-earned cash.  A straight-ahead trick, a demonstration of card-handling techniques etc etc.

Once you've figured this out you can begin, putting a routine together, and once you have done so, you are set to go.  But I have another question, how many of us do any of the above?  And out of those that do, how many stick to the script?
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