Sign up Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
GreenKnight33

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 173
Reply with quote  #1 
Hey Guys,

Hope everyone is doing well.  I've been doing magic for about 4 years (although I'm in my forties) but this year for the first time I'm going to a convention, the Magic Live one in LV in August.

The only magic community I have is the Online type, so I have never interacted with magicians in person per se.  Any tips or thoughts on how best to enjoy the convention?  I won't know anyone so I plan to be extending my hand a lot to introduce myself, and hoping to get to know some folks.

Since I don't hang out with magicians, and especially at conventions, any unspoken cultural areas of do's and don'ts?  Are there certain 'types' of folks at conventions that exist that you would say "Whatever you do, don't be like THAT!"

I've also never had a jam session per se as well, so it will be a great learning and absorbing the culture and atmosphere opportunity.

Hope this makes sense. 

BTW - If anyone on this forum is going and interested in meeting face to face, let me know.  Would love to get to say 'hi' in person.

Thanks!!
Eric
0
Robin Dawes

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,645
Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Eric

Just a few off the top of my head ... others may disagree with some of these.

Do ...
         be prepared to go without sleep.  The late late late sessions are the best.
         be prepared to eat meals at very odd times
         be prepared for "magic burnout" aka "magic overload"
         be prepared to come home with some purchases that you will never use.
         take notes, but be prepared to not understand them when you get home.
         go to every show, lecture, workshop, scheduled event you can.
         mingle, socialize, chat with whoever sits beside you.
         find and thank the organizers, if you can - putting on a convention is a huge job.

Don't ...
         be the guy who interrupts other people's private conversations ... it's just rude anywhere,
             but it seems to happen at magic conventions more than anywhere else
         be the guy who thinks it's cool to explain how the last guy did his trick
         be the guy who thinks it's cool to force the same card on a volunteer over and over
         be the guy who waves his spending money around and brags about how much
             money he spends on magic
         be the guy who thinks he has a right to be taught every trick he sees performed
             (though it's ok to say "That was great - has it been published?")
         be the guy who insists on performing the 21 card trick for the famous magician he just met

And finally, do ...
         have a great time!!

Robin


0
arthur stead

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,047
Reply with quote  #3 

Eric … what he said!  Excellent advice from Robin.  

 I would only add to set yourself a budget of how much you’ll spend on new tricks & effects … and then STICK TO IT!  In the excitement of the occasion, you’ll end up buying things you’ll regret later on.

 

Enjoy yourself!

 

Arthur


__________________
http://www.arthurstead.com
0
GreenKnight33

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 173
Reply with quote  #4 
Thank you Robin!

That is a great list of Do's and Don't s!

Thankfully I won't have much money since most of my magic funds went to the Convention, and I can't force a card to save my life.

Thanks again!  I'm excited for the opportunity to learn and I have made a list of magicians I hope to see, to at the very least just say 'thank you' for their essays or books etc., that have helped me think about magic better.

Eric
0
Amazer

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 172
Reply with quote  #5 
Sage advice, Robin.

I really can't think of anything to add, except to say that there is a very wide variety of personality and style at conventions.  On occasion, I've noticed a kind of invisible wall between some of these diverse groups, even if only at a subconscious level.  I don't know how widespread this actually is, but on more than one occasion I've been socializing with a group where condescending talk or behavior starts taking place, and have had to consciously keep myself detached from that.  Everyone has something to offer, so just remain open to all, and don't allow yourself to become (or be influenced to become) biased.  Goes without saying, I'm sure!

You're gonna have a lot of fun, Eric!

__________________
- Ken

0
EVILDAN

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,903
Reply with quote  #6 
Don't be a wallflower. Talk to people. If you walk away without making some new friends then it's on you.
0
sjrwheeler

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 103
Reply with quote  #7 

You'll have a great time. And seriously don't worry about the walls. Just be yourself, the fact that you are even worrying about this means that you aren't going to be antisocial!

I generally find everyone to be friendly at conventions, you'll have no problems meeting and chatting to people. And you'll love all the magic. 


The one thing I always try to do is look out for anyone who seems a bit shy and I start a conversation with them. I remember feeling shy at my first convention, and was very grateful for the people who started conversations with me. 

0
GreenKnight33

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 173
Reply with quote  #8 
Thank you Ken, Dan, SjrWheeler, and Blathermist!

These is all good advice!!  I will for sure keep making efforts to meet folks...and avoid negativity.

And yes, a budget for the dealer's room.  I'm actually trying to come with a list of what I intend to buy...in terms of books and effects, so perhaps it will be a sort of guide to avoid me getting distracted from the shiny new object that at that very moment seems oh so very tempting.

One more question I had...which moves more into ethics, is the sharing of tricks or moves.

Is there a general rule of thumb for what magicians should be sharing as it ties to the original creators?

Like if someone asks how do I do Out of this World, vs. How do I do the Joe Berg Tip Up palm, vs. How do I do Gemini Twins?  Each one of these is someone's invention or effect, but is there a general consensus what's ok to share?  Or is it assumed that we're free to reference where we learned the method or effect, but anything past that is stealing from the creators etc.?

I'm not too tempted to ask others, but if someone should ask me, is there a certain expectation?

Just curious.

Thank you all!
Eric
0
sjrwheeler

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 103
Reply with quote  #9 
Honestly you need to decide what you are comfortable with. You’ll be able to see what other people are doing, decide if you approve or not and share if you want to.
It’s definitely ok to not share how to do something you’ve performed.
So don’t feel any pressure.


It’s fairly common for people to discuss other people’s creations. I don’t think anyone actually learns or remembers what they’ve seen, it’s just part of the conversation. It doesn’t make it right, but I think it makes it a bit better.
Someone taught me something by Paul Gordon at a recent convention. And it was extremely good, I immediately bought the source when I came home and started actually learning it. Other things I’ve been taught and forgotten immediately but something from the method has led to a new interesting discussion.

Again, I doubt it’s morally correct, but it happens and you need to decide what you are comfortable with and stick with that.

Most importantly it’s absolutely ok for you not to share or discuss anything you don’t want to.


Don’t worry about the etiquette. Join a group at a table and you’ll work it out.
0
GreenKnight33

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 173
Reply with quote  #10 
Thanks SJRwheeler for the response. 

Sounds good.  I'll have to feel it out when I'm there.

Thanks again!
Eic
0
Tom G

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,284
Reply with quote  #11 
Another thing that is fun is watching the gatherings going on through the venue.  There's bound to be people sitting around doing magic and even giving explanations.  Although I did see a person asking the guy performing how he did it, and that didn't go over well.  But if they are performing in public, it's usually no issue to stand and watch.  For big conventions I've only been to the Genii Convention a couple of times, but last year had a blast watching Tom Gagnon, David Ben, Bernard Biliis, Mike Close, and Asi Wind all sessioning at some point or with each other.  I even skipped a lecture to watch.  Have fun.  
0
GreenKnight33

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 173
Reply with quote  #12 
Thanks Tom!!

Appreciate the well wishes!
Eric
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.