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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #1 
Not sure you can have a "slight" crisis, so I guess this is just a little setback in my development and enthusiasm. Looking for suggestions on how to process it.

I'm at a cross-roads of sorts - looking to start actually performing for reals - not just friends and family and the 3-4 minutes a month at the SAM meetings. So I'm reaching out to anyone who can give me guidance on how/where to do that.

The thing that keeps coming up is restaurants restaurants restaurants. I talked at length to a guy at the Live Magic Expo last week who is regularly working restaurants here in SA. 

Now, I'm not knocking that. Obviously it's one of the most common opportunities out there, especially for close-up folks. So I've been building up my courage to move in that direction. I say "courage" because I HATE the idea of walking up to unsuspecting people and springing a performance on them. I never did this with music and I feel so uncomfortable with the idea. But since it's so common, lots of magicians have encouraged me, so I figure I need to do it.

Then came Thanksgiving[smile]. Luckily I did not spring any magic on anyone who didn't ask (and nobody did!). I was ready, as I always am. But it was all about the music and not the magic yesterday, which is OK. But I was talking to a cousin I hadn't seen in a long time (this was a LARGE gathering of family[smile]). I mentioned that I had taken up magic and he immediately brought up the uncomfortable and awkward experience with a restaurant magician. He said the whole thing was just so awkward and unwelcome and basically ruined his meal. There was nothing creepy or odd about the magician (as does sometimes happen). It was just the whole idea of having some stranger who is not your server come over and interrupt your meal. And THAT is what I've been afraid of! 

Add to this the fact that another magician at the Expo - in a totally different and unrelated conversation, said he approached a table recently and was turned away, and he said it crushed him. And it still hurts to think about it.

David Corsaro, in a recent MUM issue, said to draw a circle on a piece of paper and in it, write your ideal vision for a magic gig. Then draw a bigger circle around that and start putting in other venues you'd like to do, but aren't your ultimate. Then do a 3rd circle, etc.

My bulls-eye circle was The Magic Castle. I'm betting that there isn't a magician alive who wouldn't consider that a dream gig. So I know I'm not alone. But it's what I want to work towards. When I asked myself why, it was simple - I want to perform for people who CAME TO SEE MAGIC. I don't want to accost strangers.

I've been told I need to "get over it" or "grow a thicker skin." I don't disagree. But surely there is a path to performing magic that doesn't involve performing for people who DON'T WANT to watch any kind of performance - magic or otherwise. As a musician, I don't wander up to cashiers or restaurant patrons and ask if they want to hear a song. 

So how does someone who is 3 years into magic with several performance-ready tricks take that next step if that person REALLY wants to avoid doing magic for people who didn't sign up for any magic?

Is that really the only path? If it is, I think I may have reached the end of a very short magic journey.

What advice do the experienced magi have for someone like me?
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Chris M

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Reply with quote  #2 
Man, I'm interested in the responses you get to this. I have absolutely nothing to offer myself, I'm firmly in the hobbyist camp, but you've asked a great question and a serious one - very interested in what pro's have to say. I hope you get to fulfil your dream, dude [smile]
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Chris! 

I am pretty sure that even if they say you can't ever really be a performer unless you're willing to walk up to unsuspecting strangers, I won't be quitting magic altogether. I love it too much. I do have one outlet in my medieval group that seems to work, and that's busking. There is still a huge element of "performing for people who didn't expect a performance." But they have to freedom to keep walking if they aren't interested. And I like that. What I don't like is cornering someone and making them feel uncomfortable and awkward. If they do want to see magic, great. But if they don't, they might do like me and SAY that it's OK, just to avoid having to seem like a jerk. (I never go to the door when sales people ring. I hate to say no. I feel bad. My wife does it for me :-P.) And then there are the folks who will just flat out say "Nope. I'm good" or whatever. The whole thing fills me with dread.

I laughed when I came back to this post because I titled it "A Sleight Crisis of Confidence." That was a total accident:-P. I really did mean to say "slight crisis." But now it's just too funny to change.
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #4 

        It may have changed since I did table magic - over 70 years ago. And the venue may have a bit to do with it - I did table magic at a late-night sort-of club - although people could order a meal there. Anyway, it would never have dawned on me to approach tables cold. There was a card on the table "Lorayne; Master of Legerdemain."  You can see a photo of it on page 121 of my "rememoire," BEFORE I FORGET. That was the original card - I had it changed after a while - a) included my first name because - people were thinking "Lorayne" was a female. b) I added the line "Ask the maître d' or your waiter."  So; people would ask for me before I approached their table. Don't know if that'd work for you, Ken.

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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks Harry. That's exactly the kind of thing. I'm so glad to hear you say it would not have dawned on you to approach tables cold. It's a huge relief for me as I sit here typing this. THANK YOU!

As for how to arrange things to allow for only those actively WANTING to (or at least actively curious) see magic, to do so while not forcing it on those who don't - the way you did it sounds intriguing. I think I also read somewhere that someone used a sort of sign on tables like at Brazilian steak houses. You or the server let's the table know right up front that there is a magician (or magicians) working the tables and if you're interested in seeing some magic, you can flip over the card - green for yes, red for no. 

Either way, there do seem to be some ways to make it less awkward. Thanks again!!
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Mind Phantom

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Reply with quote  #6 
Weddings, Cocktail Parties, Private Parties people know your the entertainment they have hired. In restaurants that's not the case. People go to restaurants to eat, not to have a balloon animal made for them or other such things. Plus at a restaurant people will "tip" you one or two bucks. That's saying that your routine is worth one or two dollars.

Read Joel Bauer's Book Hustle Hustle on how to get gigs.

You can also get gigs offering free talks to civic and service groups in your town. Go to  Toastmasters in your area and show off your stuff. Next you can introduce yourself to party and wedding planner's.

Stay away from restaurants..your routines are worth more than 1 or 2 dollars.

When I did free talks, my topic was " How not to get cheated with cards "

Logan,



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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks, Logan! I'll check out that book for sure.

Quick question - you mentioned cocktail parties. Keeping in mind I've not only never performed at one of these, but I've never SEEN anybody else perform either - is it usually a set performance? For example - you've got a table set up somewhere and you "start your set?" I've heard of "walk-around" performances at things like that and that doesn't feel all that much different from the whole interrupting people to perform thing. 

Cheers!
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logan Five


Read Joel Bauer's Book Hustle Hustle on how to get gigs.



Wow. $75 for a 35 year old book. It must be good :-P.

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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #9 
Speaking as a spoken word performer, not a magician - but the principles are the same - you are on the right track. Find those places to be bad. Not bad in the sense of failing, but bad in the sense of one point along the journey to being great. Small steps.

When I first began speaking my storytelling wings I went to bookstores, community centers, libraries, schools, churches... Anywhere there was an opportunity to to perform. Man, my voice croaked, my hands shook, my knees knocked... But within two years I was speaking before large crowds, a couple of times in arenas of 5K+ people. And it all started with "asking for the order", that is, asking for a place to perform. So in addition to Logan's earlier suggestions, try libraries, community centers, and other similar organizations. They are always looking for entertainment. The budgets are tight, but the opportunities for growth are ripe, and you will become exponentially better every time you perform.

Keep at it!
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #10 
One other thing: There was an article in a recent issue of Genii about a French magician named Bebel who did exactly what you described. He sat up a chair and performed for people who approached him. Of course he did so out of necessity, but still...

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Mind Phantom

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Reply with quote  #11 
Cocktail parties you go from a group of people to other groups of people. You say, " Hi, my name is Ken..and I am sort of the hired gun here tonight, would you like to see some magic ? " Most of  the time they will say Yes. And you go from group to group.

The same with Banquets.

I didn't know Hustle Hustle was that expensive. But, I have given you enough to get started.

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HexTheDoombunny

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Reply with quote  #12 
A couple of books to investigate. Eric Mead's Tangled Web has some really good advice for walk around magic for parties and how to cold open. Then take a peek at Eugene Burger's Mastering the Art of Magic. There's a section, Secrets of Restaurant Magic, covering his thoughts on approaching tables, etc.

Harry's advice about the card is great. Another bit of advice, similar to that, is to have the wait staff let each table know the restaurant has a magician and if they would like to see you to let them know.

Something else to consider, perhaps less for strolling gigs than restaurants but still applicable, is the importance of NOT taking tips. If you are hired, negotiate a set payment from the restaurant and decline tips. Taking tips puts you in competition with the wait staff, sometimes to the point of hostility. Redirect offers to the waiters and you will have allies in the place which can lead to busier nights for you.

The majority of my work is done mingling, walk around work at parties. I seem to have been born with no sense of propriety as I have no issue and have never had an issue, approaching strangers and doing my level best to get them to smile, laugh, or pee themselves. Makes my day!

In those walk around situations I do something similar to restaurant work in that I will have the host spread the word in advance that a magician will be there. Makes life easier for cold opens and determining which groups at the party have interest in watching.

I could go for pages on the subject so I'll stop here. I'll just say, Ken, you got the chops, now put them to use!
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Waterman

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Reply with quote  #13 
At the most recent restaurant I performed at, my cold approach worked 100% of the time...I always went to tables with families who had kids with them. Some performers restrict themselves to performing "sophisticated" magic for adult only audiences. That's fine...especially if the sophisticated adult audiences have paid to  see a magic performance. However, this is not the case with sophisticated audiences in a restaurant.

Once the other patrons caught a glimpse, or heard a reaction from the tables where I performed it was easy to seek out the "adult only" tables who looked as if they wanted in on some magical entertainment...those folks would make eye contact with big smiles on their faces indicating that they had fun witnessing the fun from across the dining room.

Other times my wife would join me a t he restaurant. While I sought out the family tables, she would approach adult patrons in the lounge area and explain that a magician was performing tonight...she would then hand them a playing card and instruct them to place it face-up on their table if they wanted to see a few tricks. Early in the evening many cards were face down, but as the night wore on they would eventually turn face-up.

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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #14 
Thanks for all those ideas!
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Tom G

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Reply with quote  #15 
You might also approach busy restaurants and see if they'll let you perform for the people waiting to get in. 
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GreenKnight33

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Reply with quote  #16 
Hey Ken,

Great questions.  I haven't done any walk around etc, but another option to have people "want" to see you is by booking a gig at a person's house.

Al Schneider did this.  We would get a gig for a party at someone's house, but set up a room in the house where he would perform a 10-15 set.  So only small groups of 5-6 at a time would come in.

So he was able to control the flow of traffic and set things up just how he wanted.  Another magician (who's name I'm blanking on), would do the same as Al, with one more twist. After the set, he would tell each person to go out into the party to invite one more person to come, but they weren't allowed to share anything they witnessed, but only allowed to use adjectives to describe how the magic made them feel.

This would honestly be my own personal preference as well, but I do love Harry's ideas about a card or something to let people know a magician is on the premises.  Even if you just got a once a week gig at a restaurant, you could have bright cards made up and have the restaurant staff place them each on the table.  Then when a group dining saw it, if they wanted you to come over, they would place it in the front part of the table so it was clearly visible.  Just thinking out loud.

Best of luck to you!
Eric
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #17 
Thanks Eric! Interesting idea.

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Mind Phantom

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Reply with quote  #18 
http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=237529&forum=15&start=20

This is probably one of the best post I have read at the green place on the subject of performing and magic as a form of art.
Hope you enjoy it, it's the long post in the thread.

I think you'll love the advice he gives. It's the 10th post from the top and the posters name is Darrylasher.

Best,

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Ben Morris-Rains

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Reply with quote  #19 
I believe Eugene Burger took a similar approach as Harry and would have the servers mention to the customers that there is a house magician and if they would like to see some magic to let them know and they will have him come to the table. This is probably the only way I would ever do restaurant magic. I don't go out to eat very often, and when I do, I really don't want anyone bothering me, even a magician... I mean i'm sure I'd give him the benefit of the doubt. I think these days with people being even more individualistic and having shorter attention spans, making sure they are already interested in you is the best approach. 
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #20 
Thanks Ben and Logan.

I'm glad I wasn't the OP in the Green Place thread. That was pretty brutal, true or not. I immediately started wondering if that's how I come across here and really hope it isn't. I did get kind of beat up over there by a few people when I was just starting (heck, I'm STILL "just starting), which is why I love this forum so much better. The most common gut punches I got over there were along the lines of "slow down and stop asking so many questions." In my mind I was just an eager sponge wanting to learn as much as I could. I studied a lot on my own but as I'm sure folks here know, sometimes it's just better to ask the experts/more experienced magicians.

I like to think I am not asking for something for nothing like TMC OP above. I've certainly invested enough $$ in magic resources, primarily based on suggestions I get here. I also DO realize that at this early stage, I'm probably asking more than giving. I don't really like that deficit, but I chalk it up to the balance of what I do not know compared with what I do. I fully expect that balance to change when the scales are more balanced and I have the experience, knowledge and skill to share as much as receive help.

Regardless of all that, there were some helpful bits of advice in the thread from the commentor in his 7 points. I agree with them, though I wonder were these lounges and clubs are hiring magic headliners and holding magic open-mics. They certainly are not here in San Antonio. I wish they were, though. That sounds perfect [smile].

Thanks again for the tips.




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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #21 
I didn't check these to see if they were music or comedy. But here are some links to check.
In my experience, best to case out the joint, because some of the listings may be old and no longer valid.
But it gives you a starting point.

http://www.openmicsanantonio.com/
https://www.yelp.com/search?find_desc=Open+Mic&find_loc=San+Antonio%2C+TX
https://www.eventbrite.com/d/tx--san-antonio/open-mic/
https://www.facebook.com/saopenmicnights/



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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #22 
Thanks Dan. I wasn't in any doubt that there were open mics for music. And that's what these all are. As a musician, especially, in my younger days, I'd check these things out. It was just that the guy who commented in that Green Place thread talked about doing magic at open mic nights. I've never seen that - ever. And I've done quite a few as a musician. The types of places we're talking about here in SA are exclusively places looking for live music unless specifically marked otherwise). 

It is an interesting idea that one could spring a magic act at one of these open-mic nights just to see what would happen. My guess is, not much. Even if I were inclined to try that, I can't imagine trying to do close-up magic on one of the typical stages in places like this. 

But in keeping with original question, who knows? With me, it's a matter of all the things I don't know. It's so vast that I don't know what I don't know. Hence all the questions I always have for those that have so much more experience than I.
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #23 
Ken, for what it's worth, you come across to me as a sincere and enthusiastic amateur willing to work hard, learn, and grow. You seem to love magic and have an insatiable thirst for knowledge. What a great place you've found to assist you along your journey! Frankly I am envious. Would that such a forum existed when I was starting out! I think this is a fabulous forum with room for all, especially those with a beginners mind, regardless of experience or status. We all have plenty to learn, and I for one have learned plenty as a member here. So ask your questions and revel in the resources of the hive mind here. They help not only you, but others as well. You will have your chance to give back in time, and there's little doubt that you will do so with patience and grace.
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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #24 
There are a few comedy open mics listed above.

I was told by a woman who runs a local comedy open mic that she would put me on in an instant, and put me on towards the beginning because it's mostly comics that sign up for open mic. Magic would break it up and be a nice change.
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Chris M

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Reply with quote  #25 
If you've got the guts I say go for it! Wish I had the brass balls to do magic for an open mic event, lol [smile]
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #26 
Thanks so much for that, Anthony! 

And Dan - THAT is one thing I have never done - comedy open-mics. I feel like I have a really good sense of humor and I love stand-up comedy (I have all the Sirius XM channels memorized [smile]). But I've never done it because I don't feel I'd be any good at it. I really envy the magicians (Chad Long comes to mind) who makes me laugh like every 30 seconds while all the magic is happening. 

I'm having a bit of trouble visualizing what type of thing I would do if, as a close-up kinda guy - I were on a stage in a comedy club. What was it about your stuff that your comedy club person liked and thought would be good for the whole stage and mic kind of set-up? I'm wondering if I have anything in my repertoire that would work.
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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #27 
Chop Cup, Card to Wallet.....
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EVILDAN
Chop Cup, Card to Wallet.....


That takes me by complete surprise, especially since the chop cup is one of my go-to tricks. How do you (sorry for the 3rd degree :-P) manage to do a chop cup routine while standing on stage in front of a microphone?

Logistics seems to be at the heart of my current spate of confusion.
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Chris M

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Reply with quote  #29 
Paul Daniels had a comedy chop cup routine [smile]
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Mind Phantom

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Reply with quote  #30 
Ken,

I didn't want to have you see yourself as the OP in that thread, but, rather get those 7 points which were talked about in thatpost.

I am sorry if I confused you. You don't come across that way here on TMF, and I like to read your posts here. The point I was trying to make is that you need to do a LOT of performing before you order your business cards. I did free talks for a LONG time before I asked for money.

Soon I will have to network with groups and I see that giving free talks will help me get business via referrals and other ways of developing leads though the contact I make with other people who are interested in buying or selling or investing in real estate.

I wish everyone on TMF would read those 7 points and take it's wisdom to heart. I should have cut and pasted just those seven points instead of the whole thread to avoid confusion.

Logan,

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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #31 
I wear a headset mic, or I project. I just emceed a burlesque show this weekend and we dispensed with the mic because the producer felt I didn't need it. I performed card to wallet that night.

If it's an issue of what to do with the mic, incest in a Gim-crack type of device. This goes around your neck and holds the mic in place. I've used these as well, but not very often.
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #32 
Dan - I was more wondering about the table required for a chop cup routine. Did you have your busking table on stage? Or did you move down to the floor?
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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #33 
Become a regular at some local place, like a private cafe or something. Get to be known as the magic guy, leave biz cards around. You get to know people that way.
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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #34 
This was our set up for this year's haunt. We were 2 feet off the ground and that is the exact table and lighting. I use an insTand table with the smaller top. For festivals I use the bigger top because I have more tabletop space.

I love this table because it's so small sms so thin that when the baseballs appear; they have no clue.

This was the first year that we had a 2 foot elevated stage. I thought for sure they'd see their loads. They didn't.

Attached Images
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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #35 
In the posting above, sms should be "and."
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #36 
Awesome, Dan. Thanks!!
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Reply with quote  #37 
Hi Ken, one idea I've used to get time in front of a small audience of non-family, non-work colleague spectators is enquire at a local residential/retirement homes.

Management in these places are often on the look out for performers, musicians, singers etc to entertain residents. I've found them to be very receptive and keen to participate. Here in Australia they require you to have a Police Character Check, obviously that may differ where you are, it's a scheduled show of 20-30 minutes so no feeling you are imposing yourself on the audience, they'll (the residential home) will pay.

I find the residents very receptive and even nostalgic for magic and very keen to get involved.

Guarantee you'll bring some smiles to some faces. (The care staff and any visitors always stick around too, they love it).

Also i'm sure you would have seen this but here is a chop cup routine from Scott Alexander for a stage or parlour setting.



Hope this helps

Gareth



 
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #38 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth


Also i'm sure you would have seen this but here is a chop cup routine from Scott Alexander for a stage or parlour setting.
Hope this helps

Gareth
 


Thanks Gareth. I see another little table there like the one Dan mentioned. My table is much larger. I suppose it would matter much? I should probably get one of those small ones though, to be flexible. Thanks!
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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #39 
http://www.instand.com/

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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #40 
Thanks Dan! do you just put a separate performance pad on it?
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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #41 
Pattrick now makes them for both size tops. Scroll down. It's either on page1 or 2.

http://www.pattricksmagic.com/pattrick-s-magical-mats/
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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #42 
Thanks for that link Dan. Very cool.

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Magic-Aly

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Reply with quote  #43 
Ken,

I get the impression that you are primarily into magic because you love it and it is fun. And, of course you want to perform for people; after all, it s a performing art and it is a real high when people are blown away and really react, as I'm sure you've experienced.

I have done a lot of restaurant magic, at many restaurants, over a period of many years. It is, by far, the hardest venue in which to perform magic.  At a private party, you will not get rejected often when you approach, because people expect entertainers in that setting and are generally very receptive to being entertained, including by a magician - not all, but most.  But in a restaurant, it can be weird [rofl], as I'm sure you realize.  It is not a natural setting for magic and there are many and varied reasons why people are not receptive to a magician approaching their table when they are out to eat. It's never anything personal when they say no - but it still feels bad. I do not agree with those who say you have to do restaurant work - that it's a must.  You don't have to, and it's not a must.  Unless you are in a situation like I was for much of my career, where I effectively had to do any kind of gig I could get, including restaurant, and you absolutely need the money, I would advise you to stay away from restaurant work.

it just doesn't strike me that restaurant magic suits your personality and it could actually have a negative impact on your love and joy for magic.  However, if you do end up doing it, I highly suggest that you get table tents made, letting people know there is a magician and if they would like to have him come to the table, either ask their server, or put the tent on the edge of the table.  That way you don't have to deal with awkwardness of approaching people who are not receptive, and the pain of rejection. Harry understood that very early on. Now, I have made some good money in restaurants - especially in tips - and particularly where it's an upscale bar/restaurant as opposed to a low budget and/or family type joint, where the tips are generally meager, mainly because a lot of families with kids just don't have much money to spare.  In the cocktail lounge-type restaurant I've worked at the past 3 years or so, I have had "regulars" that will tip me $20, I've even had several who tip me $100. That feels good.  I never approach a table cold.  If they don't ask for me, I don't go. The management knows that, and I just won't do it under any other arrangement.  It's a question of pride at this point. One of the big benefits of the restaurant work I've done is that it's led to private bookings. If I didn't have a lot of regulars who come in specially to see me and/or bring friends or family, I wouldn't do it at all anymore. I have enough private shows because I've been in the game for over 30 years.

So that leaves us with your fundamental question: Where can I perform? And the related question of how to get going.  The suggestion of retirement communities or assisted living communities was a good one. I am not talking about nursing homes.  There are some upscale retirement or assisted living communities which are eager for entertainers for parties and they pay well. Condominium or homeowners associations can be good as well.  The people in these types of venues are usually very enthusiastic and are a welcoming audience.  If you are more comfortable doing walk around, as opposed to a stand up show, tell the management that up front.  Let them know you will walk around and amaze people and perform at tables, as well. Or, you can do like I do - tell them you'll walk around for an hour to an hour and a half, and then do a short 15 minute show for everyone thereafter.

The other thing I would do if I were you is start contacting party/special event planners.  If they have a physical office, go there (don't even call).  Dress very well, go in and introduce yourself with a smile, and do a quick strong trick. Have some nice business cards made if you don't already have them. Start thinking about getting a website together complete with a couple videos (e.g. chop cup or sponge balls or rabbits).as in this day and age, prospective clients often want to see that. Have someone take some videos of you performing in front of friends and/or family and tell them to really let loose, as it is going to be promotional.  The most successful videos are the ones where the people look like they are having a ball and are really reacting. If you get in with even one party planner initially, that will be a great stride, and you will meet people at the gigs who will hire you for their events

Getting established in the magic business really takes time and perseverance, so patience will serve you well, baby steps are still progress, and most of all, enjoy yourself and your magic and have fun along the way! 


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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #44 
Thanks SO MUCH for that reply. You gave me some excellent ideas about potential venues.

I prefer to do a show at my stand-up table. that allows me to do anything - stuff that requires a table as well as anything that doesn't. "Strolling" doesn't feel comfortable to me. Even though I have several tricks (Turbo Stick paddle, some coin tricks, some card tricks) that are definitely best suited to doing in front of a few people standing right in front of me, the whole approaching unsuspecting people and asking if they want to see something still is not my cup of tea. So I'm really glad to hear that lots of venues would EXPECT to have a timed set where everyone gathers to watch. THAT is the scenario I feel the most comfortable with. 

Thanks again for that!
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Mind Phantom

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Reply with quote  #45 
Ken,

How about working at a bar and doing magic for the customers there. You don't have to do walk-around magic, the customers come to you.

Of course, you would have to go to bartender's school, but you'll get paid more then likely a hourly wage, but the big bucks would be in tips to you.

This is something I am thinking about doing myself, and work a few days out of the week.

Logan,

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KenTheriot

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Reply with quote  #46 
Thanks for that idea, Logan. I'll keep that in the back of my mind.


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StevePR104

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Reply with quote  #47 
Guys:
A couple of thoughts based on the stuff I've read above:

•  Remember, above all else, that people will react to YOU far more than the magic.  So it's important to keep in mind how you approach them and what you say in terms of your introduction.  

•  Restaurant magic?  It can be incredibly easy, if you keep this in mind....you are the interregnum between your patrons ordering their meal and when it's delivered.  Don't try to entertain when they're eating.  And keep it simple, and NEVER insult the folks at the table.  I've approached tables making fun of myself:  "Hi, I'm your magician for the evening, helping you to pass a couple of pointless minutes until your food arrives."  Engage the people at the table.  And play to the kids at the table wherever possible, even if you're doing magic for grownups.  (Apologies to Magic-Aly.)

•  Strolling magic?  At a corporate cocktail party, I'd advise having an effect that favorably incorporates your client's logo.  That makes the client feel all warm and fuzzy, and provides a "moment of wonder" that transcends the magic they expect to see.  It also gives you immediate entree to the small groups which you'll see at these parties.  Again, a smile, a warm welcome...and a quick effect will win the day *almost* every time.

•  Bar magic?  Increasingly, as a magician, I've found restaurants don't want you behind the bar for legal/liability reasons.  Unless you're Doc Eason.  Walk the length of the bar...engage your patrons.  And keep it simple...they're likely to be at least partially inebriated.

Hope this helps.
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