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Bill Guinee

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Reply with quote  #1 
I have been making a shortlist of tricks in my repertoire that will absolutely meet the conditions under which I hope to be performing soon. To do so, I made a pretty demanding list of criteria. When I applied this list to my performance level repertoire, I found that I don't have many tricks left. I intend to use this list as a way of deciding what to concentrate on learning in the near future.
     So, I would like to present you with the list and ask your help. If there are tricks that you think are great and that also meet all of my criteria, please let me know about them. It would help the most if you could also give me a citation so that I would know where to go to learn these tricks.
     Sorry, this is a big task to be dumping on you, but if anyone sees it as a fun exercise and would like to help, I would appreciate it.

Here is my huge list of requirements:
  1. Strong Magic effect
  2. Performed standing close up at tableside
  3. But, doesn't require table space (except for perhaps a few inches to rest things on - nothing performed on the table including ribbon spreads, false riffle shuffles, etc.)
  4. Short - 2 and a half to three minutes absolute maximum and if this long ideally multi-effect modular that can be left off without completing the routine.
  5. Direct and Clear - no complicated plots or procedures
  6. Inoffensive - (no sexual innuendos, religious or political jabs, etc. but this doesn't mean not using playing cards even if their existence offends some people)
  7. Not gross or vulgar (can't use mouth, saliva, etc.)
  8. Very little pocket space required
  9. Props are either very durable and not likely to get lost OR very cheap to replace
  10. Doesn't borrowing anything of significant value from spectators (a one-dollar bill is OK)
  11. No fire, flames, smoke, etc.
  12. No "games" where the spectator always loses
  13. No sucker tricks.
  14. Instant Resets only
  15. Angle Proof (or close to totally angle proof)
  16. Visible in low light situations (so probably no copper to silver)
  17. Allows but doesn't require more than two spectators at a time (so no tricks for instance where four cards need to be chosen)
  18. Highly Reliable

Additional considerations (preferences):

I am particularly in need of short visual openers.

Ideally, my repertoire will include non-card material; I love cards but don't want to do only cards.

Some material needs to play to children as well as adults (see non-cards note)

I am afraid of thread but could possibly learn to get over this

Well within my skill range - so high level of confidence -- of course I would have to determine this.

By the way, I intend to be performing strolling tablesides at restaurants, in the lobby, and standing in the bar.

Thanks again to anyone brave enough to help with this.

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John Cowne

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Reply with quote  #2 
Sponge balls.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #3 
Interesting "filters." What tricks can survive this filtration system? Looking forward to the impending ideas...

M
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #4 
Professor's Nightmare. Dan Fleshman, a well-known restaurant performer and friend of mine ALWAYS does it table-to-table. You can screen the "dirty work" from adjacent tables. Then if you want, follow up with cut-and-restored rope or a ring and rope routine.
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Bill Guinee

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Cowne
Sponge balls.
Thanks, John. You have confirmed my opinion of one of the few effects that I do that made the list. I do need to clean up one segment which uses the table and make sure I can skip it if need be. Thanks.
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Bill Guinee

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ
Professor's Nightmare. Dan Fleshman, a well-known restaurant performer and friend of mine ALWAYS does it table-to-table. You can screen the "dirty work" from adjacent tables. Then if you want, follow up with cut-and-restored rope or a ring and rope routine.
Ray, you are also thinking along similar lines to me. I have included my "Fiber Optics" routine which includes some professor's nightmare type stuff and a ring section. I might take your advice and consider a cut and restored effect. Thanks.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #7 
Remember, you can use a purse frame for both coins and sponge balls so it helps by serving double-duty. If you are working all night it helps to switch things up. Keeps you interested and prevents you having to repeat too much. Produce the coins and then go into a coins across or two in the hand, one in the pocket routine. A lot of coin tricks don't require a table or if you need, you can enlist a spectator to offer a hand.
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SamtheNotasBadasIWas

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Reply with quote  #8 
It might help to list all of the tricks you already have as it might give people an idea of what your interested in and where you strengths lie.
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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #9 
Submitted for your consideration...

A brief, fast-paced one-coin routine ending with the production of a jumbo coin.
Coins Across using shell. 
Twisting the Aces.
Crazy Man's Handcuffs. Three phases, ending on spectator's fingers. 
Bill Kalush's Rubber Ringer or Mike Powers's Ring Bandit - without borrowing the rings, obviously.
Frank Zack's Dice Routine from his TMF lecture. Doesn't require too much table space if handled correctly.
And perhaps a paddle trick... maybe Turbo Stick? 

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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #10 
Great advice so far!

What about the classic (cliched?) opener that everyone seemed to use for a while: colour-changing knives?

Also:

Card-Warp
Mini Chop Cup (not a spectator is always wrong presentation though - I agree about avoiding those)
Since AV mentioned Frank Zack's Dice Routine, I'll suggest the Dr. Sacks Dice Routine - it's done completely in the hands.  Bob Sheets has a great version called "It's the Rules"
Three-Fly?   (I'm not a coin guy)
For sponge balls, check out Bill Malone's "Thinking Man's Sponge Ball Routine"  - it has multiple modular phases - you can choose your favourite bits.  I've used the first couple of phases as a table opener - very strong.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #11 
Regarding paddle tricks, if this is a restaurant, and I assume it is, you can do some interesting things with table knives and torn up pieces of napkin affixed to the blade.  If you don't want to use saliva to stick the bits of napkin, you can either dip your finger into a water glass or go an entirely different direction and use peel-and-stick labels.  You can get them in white and colors for color changes, etc.

BTW, if you dip your finger into the water, make sure to take it with you!

The other thing to ponder is whether you want to incorporate effects using things normally associated with restaurants.  Vanishing sugar?  Torn-and-restored sugar packets?  Vanished coin found in sugar packet?  Tricks that use tableware such as glasses?

Edit:  Torn-and-restored napkin is an obvious one.  You could do the sucker one with the fake explanation or not.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #12 
On the card front, The Biddle Trick is a good ice-breaker because it is quick and easy to follow and you can use the spectator's hands.  The other one that comes to mind is any quick two card transposition that you do.  You can do the Scarne version with a glass or not.
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Bill Guinee

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Reply with quote  #13 
Great advice - thanks guys. I am developing a great master list now. I don't think anyone has mentioned the bill switch yet.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Guinee
Great advice - thanks guys. I am developing a great master list now. I don't think anyone has mentioned the bill switch yet.


Bill switch is great, and you can also do the mis-made bill switch.  If you don't own one of the specially-cut bills, they aren't too expensive.  Then after the first switch you can switch the bill into 4 quarters and use those for a subsequent trick.

So it makes sense, regular dollar, "quartered" dollar and finally quarters.  


[mismade]

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Anthony Vinson

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Guinee
Great advice - thanks guys. I am developing a great master list now. I don't think anyone has mentioned the bill switch yet.


Well, you did list low light conditions, and that's why I didn't mention it. Might not play well in low-light environs.

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Bill Guinee

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony Vinson


Well, you did list low light conditions, and that's why I didn't mention it. Might not play well in low-light environs.

Av
Good point, Anthony. I find it difficult to apply my own criteria.
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #17 
For some interesting ideas based on bill switching, see Sankey's "Indestructible Collection"

https://sankey-magic.myshopify.com/products/indestructible-collection

He supplies a set of Tyvek bill-sized sheets and a DVD on which he teaches a bunch of creative (sometimes off-the-wall) routines using them.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #18 
How low is LOW in low light? There's a threshold under which you could barely do magic. Even though the ropes are visible for PN or T&R, the experience is greatly degraded in low light IMO. Are we talking about candle light or just subdued lighting? If I knew that the lighting would be very low for a proposed gig, I'd advise against doing it. 

I had a gig, long ago, in which one of the rooms was very dimly lit. I think it was only lit by candles on the table. I brought a battery powered small light with me and set it on the table. It wasn't that the props couldn't be seen without the extra light. I just knew that the experience of magic would be so degraded that it was pointless to perform in there.

M
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chris w

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Reply with quote  #19 
What's necessary for the bill switch isn't much to carry, and there's a good chance of finding adequate lighting in at least one of the environments Bill identified (tableside, bar, lobby) much of the time.

Surprised not to see mentioned yet: Ambitious Card, Card to Wallet, Bottle through Table, Omni (or Phantom) Deck, etc.

If I were Bill, I'd be looking closely at Fay Presto's act for guidance: https://www.penguinmagic.com/p/12388
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Bill Guinee

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Reply with quote  #20 
Good clarification Mike. I only mean subdued light. Basically nice evening restaurant lighting. So, for example, switching a one dollar bill for a hundred might be tricky, from the distance from standing performer to opposite side of table, whereas switching for a mismade bill, as Ray suggests, might work better. I don’t know the specifics yet, but I agree that I won’t work in the dark.
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Stevie Ray

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Reply with quote  #21 
The first trick would be to free your mind... it’s a trick that few magicians even attempt.

Script everything.

Since it sounds as though you are looking for new routines. If you are in the habit of writing and internalizing your scripts, you have freed your mind.

You are freer to improvise; freer to act your part.

You become much more free to engage… You can get the laughs you need for misdirection and build to applause cues.

Practice your script without speaking. Some places are loud... and shouting one’s lines detracts. Ocasionally you will encounter groups with whom you do not share a common language. Develop the same advantage as Charlie Chaplin, Johnny Thompson and Teller.

Having a pantomime version of your effect is not only practical, rehearsing it will make your spoken presentation more lively and expressive. You’ll soon find you can eliminate dialogue and create suspense, drama and comedy simply with gestures.

I heard this advice from Penn Gillette: begin simply by imagining you can do the effects with real magic. Do this empty-handed. Feel exactly what the audience sees and play big. You’ll gain scripting and blocking ideas that might have remained hidden. Continuing in this vein, note the moments where a move, steel, switch or other action must take place. Make sure your actions are natural in these moments.

I have mad respect for and enjoy watching the great performers who remain seated throughout their act. Performing while standing is my preference. Having a script makes me stand taller and plant my feet. The cats who say they like to wing it when it comes to scripting are the same ones who rock back and forth from foot to foot.

As a few have noted, the TT bill switch meets your criteria. I never solicit for tips. Asking for any bill can create an awkward moment while table hoping. However, when a bill is offered, having a loaded TT ready to go is helpful.

I used a TT as an approach... especially if there were kids at a table. Walk almost past a table, stop, look down and stoop to pick up a “dropped” $1 bill. did someone here lose this? You, young man… If you can identify this it’s yours… Whose face is on the other side of this bill… No I’m sorry, it’s not George Washington… It’s my face, I’m Steve and I’m a magician… And I’ve got a one dollar bill… I’d give this back to you but you look like a big thinker to me… What would you like me to do with this one dollar bill?

Always script a couple of introductions, Most art forms have some sort of introduction… Restaurant magic is the only theatrical art form I can think of where the would-be audience begins by having their conversation interrupted. And while it might work for some, “Hey everybody… Wanna see a magic trick?“ can be a bit lackluster.

Lastly, Penn Gillette’s play-acting, the pantomime, writing and internalizing the script, will help you in choosing your routines… Think about the order of routines in relation to segues and callbacks, which make presentations more entertaining.
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
How low is LOW in low light? There's a threshold under which you could barely do magic.

If the light is really dim you could crack out the glow-in-the-dark thimbles that used to be for sale.  I always thought it was a silly concept - how impressive is it to make something vanish when the lights are out?

But more seriously, this reminds me that people get tons of entertainment out of a D-Lite (or a pair of them) even in normal indoor lighting.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers

I had a gig, long ago, in which one of the rooms was very dimly lit. I think it was only lit by candles on the table. I brought a battery powered small light with me and set it on the table.


This reminds me of Gary Ouellet, who seems to crop up every day now on TMF.  I think he used to set up his close-up pad with little spotlights - but I can't find any photos to back this up.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Dawes

If the light is really dim you could crack out the glow-in-the-dark thimbles that used to be for sale.  I always thought it was a silly concept - how impressive is it to make something vanish when the lights are out?

But more seriously, this reminds me that people get tons of entertainment out of a D-Lite (or a pair of them) even in normal indoor lighting.




This reminds me of Gary Ouellet, who seems to crop up every day now on TMF.  I think he used to set up his close-up pad with little spotlights - but I can't find any photos to back this up.


Wouldn't surprise me, he was an innovator. Here he works with speakers.

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Bill Guinee

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris w
What's necessary for the bill switch isn't much to carry, and there's a good chance of finding adequate lighting in at least one of the environments Bill identified (tableside, bar, lobby) much of the time.

Surprised not to see mentioned yet: Ambitious Card, Card to Wallet, Bottle through Table, Omni (or Phantom) Deck, etc.

If I were Bill, I'd be looking closely at Fay Presto's act for guidance: https://www.penguinmagic.com/p/12388
Thanks, Chris. I didn't know about Fay. This is great.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris w
What's necessary for the bill switch isn't much to carry, and there's a good chance of finding adequate lighting in at least one of the environments Bill identified (tableside, bar, lobby) much of the time.

Surprised not to see mentioned yet: Ambitious Card, Card to Wallet, Bottle through Table, Omni (or Phantom) Deck, etc.

If I were Bill, I'd be looking closely at Fay Presto's act for guidance: https://www.penguinmagic.com/p/12388


The reason I didn't include Ambitious Card and Card to Wallet was because Bill said 

"Ideally, my repertoire will include non-card material; I love cards but don't want to do only cards." 


Those two are obvious choices.  I did mention some quick card effects when Bill mentioned specifically he wanted ideas for openers.

Personally, I think there are so many great tricks you can do BESIDES Card to Wallet and Ambitious Card that you should focus on them first.


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chris w

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Reply with quote  #26 
I agree that there are more original choices, Ray. I was just mentioning some of the ones that would usually come up since some non-card material (not "no card material") was listed as a preference rather than a requirement.

I think Stevie Ray's post above is full of good advice.
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UnbiasedMagicReviews

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Reply with quote  #27 
Here's some suggestions from my magic reviews that fit your criteria: 






Here you can use cheap Altoid boxes, so if you lose them, you can replace them easily. You can carry this in a little bag and use it for table hopping. 


Check out this penguin live lecture - there are 2 effects here you might like: 
1. 5 to 1 transpo
2. Pin through handkerchief (cheap props, no difficult sleights). 






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Gareth

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Reply with quote  #28 
Bill, I think the opinion of the greatest close-up and restaurant magician of all-time with regards to his favourite and strongest trick, the one he’d take ahead of any effect in magic might be a candidate. It’s one of my absolute favourites. A 45 second stunner, Has taken me almost 6 months of practice before I was happy to perform in a paid situation but boy is it worth it.
Mike Skinner’s Ring on Stick )1st method.
Available ftom Meir Yedid. Watch the video on the page link below.
https://www.mymagic.com/l/walk-around-magic/ring-on-the-stick-michael-skinner

The only criteria it perhaps doesn’t meet is not borrowing something of value. You could ofcourse supply your own ring but I do borrow a ring but Up to you.
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth
Bill, I think the opinion of the greatest close-up and restaurant magician of all-time with regards to his favourite and strongest trick, the one he’d take ahead of any effect in magic might be a candidate. It’s one of my absolute favourites. A 45 second stunner, Has taken me almost 6 months of practice before I was happy to perform in a paid situation but boy is it worth it.
Mike Skinner’s Ring on Stick )1st method.
Available ftom Meir Yedid. Watch the video on the page link below.
https://www.mymagic.com/l/walk-around-magic/ring-on-the-stick-michael-skinner

The only criteria it perhaps doesn’t meet is not borrowing something of value. You could ofcourse supply your own ring but I do borrow a ring but Up to you.


Excellent one Gareth. BTW, when I do ring on string or anything that requires a ring I am always prepared to use my own. If I am fortunate that a man is in the audience wearing a class ring I will ask to borrow it. Sometimes I trade, sort of an insurance policy. I am in the camp of those that will never borrow a ladies ring with stones that could get lost or settings damaged. A plain band, yes.
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Gareth

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Reply with quote  #30 
I understand RayJ very valid point. I'm going to say though, and happy to discuss, that the effect is that much stronger with a borrowed ring that more often than not I'm going to use a borrowed ring. Agree I'm going to borrow bands rather than rocks and I'm not going to perform this over a floor surface with gaps eg. decking or grass or in dark light or disco lights. Studying this routine though in detail is a lesson in clarity, simplicity and motivation/naturalness. The time put in, make the handling as sure fire as it can be. i think a pitfall with this effect might be that whilst the mechanics are simple the whole package is not. 

Other options of Ring on a Stick is Harry's in Reputation Makers and an excellent section in Curtis Kam's lecture at reelmagicmagazine
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Gareth

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Reply with quote  #31 
And I love the line, “ and...you may keep this as a souvenir!” As you hand the ring back.
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Mbreggar

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Reply with quote  #32 
I am (re)learning Shoot Ogawa’s “Ninja Rings”. similarly, ring on string/rope with a vanish and reappearance in Einhorn’s “Nest of Wallets”.  
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RayJ

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Reply with quote  #33 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbreggar
I am (re)learning Shoot Ogawa’s “Ninja Rings”. similarly, ring on string/rope with a vanish and reappearance in Einhorn’s “Nest of Wallets”.  
. Ninja Rings is also a great suggestion. Danny Fleshman, who learned it from the creator and was given permission to teach it, always does it in restaurant work. Packs relatively small and involves the spectator, so perfect for what you want. The links in their hand make a huge impact.
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Paco Nagata

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Reply with quote  #34 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers
Interesting "filters." What tricks can survive this filtration system? Looking forward to the impending ideas...

M

The first thing that came to my mind was Card Magic...
well, in fact it's the only thing that came to my mind when it comes to magic...

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Waterman

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Reply with quote  #35 
Seeing Roger Klause and Mike Skinner discuss Ring and Stick reminded me of an effect in, "Roger Klause in Concert" called The Miser's Cornucopia. it can be done with a dollar bill which then can be used in a mis-made bill routine...or Roger's $100.00 Bill Change.
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Alan Smithee

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Reply with quote  #36 

Each to their own is a phrase that crops up quite a lot. Quite rightly.

With the exception of coins, as in the loose change people have in their pocket or purse, I NEVER borrow anything from spectators.

And jewellery is the Ultimate No-No.

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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #37 
"Jewelry is the Ultimate No-No."

I agree. There are some real horror stories about "Ring Flite" gone bad. Yikes!

M
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Bill Guinee

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Reply with quote  #38 
You guys have been absolutely terrific and have given me lots of good ideas. I am posting, below, the master list of tricks that you have recommended as strong magic that meets the conditions that I laid out in this thread. Perhaps someone else would like to see the whole list. Thanks again.

Professor's Nightmare (see Fleshman)

Cut and Restored Rope

Ring on Rope

Sponge Balls (see Bill Malone "Thinking Man's Sponge Ball Routine)

Purse frame for both sponge balls and Coins

Coins Across using shell

Coins 2 in hand one in pocket routine

One coin routine ending with production of jumbo coin

Three Fly?

Crazy Mans Handcuffs

Bill Kalush's Rubber Rings

Mike Powers' Ring Bandit (w/o borrowing the rings)

Frank Zaks's Dice Routine (see tmf lect)

Dr. Sack's Dice Routine (see Bob Sheets "It's the Rules")

Turbo Stick

Color Changing knives

Card Warp

Mini Chop Cup

Things normally found in restaurants (sugar packets, glasses, etc)

Torn and Restored Napkin

Biddle Trick in spectator's hands

Quick 2 card transposition

Ambitious Card

Card to Wallet

Bottle through Table

Omni (or Phantom) Deck

D-Lite

Danny Urbanas - Lazy Man's Penetration (Raw Linkage - on Five Video)

UPS - Roddy McGhie and Dee Christopher

Occultatum - Menny Lindenfeld

Thou shalt not steal (5-1 transposition) & Phantom Returns (Pin through Handkerchief) (from Paul Vigil's Penguin Live Act)

Mike Skinner's Ring on Stick

Einhorn's Nest of Wallets

Ninja Rings (Fleshman) (Shoot Ogawa)

Miser’s Cornucopia (from Roger Krause in concert)

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snmagic

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Reply with quote  #39 
Dice, Dice Baby by John Carey and Die-abolical by Steve cook have great for me. As I can use them both one right after another. Lots of time we have that one person say., " Do it again". Well it's good to be ready for that.
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Gareth

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Reply with quote  #40 
Close up smaller scale rings alternative option to Ninja rings are the Messado rings seen here.
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Gareth

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Reply with quote  #41 
Bill, do you have a reelmagicmagazine subscription?

If so checkout David Penn's second piece, his Bottle Production,  in Season 8 of Tuesday Night Tricks. Some very interesting, very strong and very achievable bits of walk around/restaurant business.

Saw it and thought of you. (In truth I saw and thought, heck yes!, then I thought of you[wink].)

Gareth
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Bill Guinee

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Reply with quote  #42 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth
Bill, do you have a reelmagicmagazine subscription?

If so checkout David Penn's second piece, his Bottle Production,  in Season 8 of Tuesday Night Tricks. Some very interesting, very strong and very achievable bits of walk around/restaurant business.

Saw it and thought of you. (In truth I saw and thought, heck yes!, then I thought of you[wink].)

Gareth


Thanks, Gareth. I do have a reelmagicmagazine subscription and I will check it out. Obviously, their "Live at the Jailhouse" series also has good stuff.
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Gareth

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Reply with quote  #43 
Of course. That’d completely slipped my mind.😂
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