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John Carey

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Thanks a million to Rudy Tinoco and the Magicians forum for hosting my cards and coins super sessions tonight. What a great time as I taught and we chatted and sessioned. 3 and a half hours flew by! A very big thank you to every one who purchased tickets and attended. You will have the
video recording very soon. Cheers😀🍺🍺🍺

John
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RayJ

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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Carey
Thanks a million to Rudy Tinoco and the Magicians forum for hosting my cards and coins super sessions tonight. What a great time as I taught and we chatted and sessioned. 3 and a half hours flew by! A very big thank you to every one who purchased tickets and attended. You will have the
video recording very soon. Cheers😀🍺🍺🍺

John


John, I think I speak for all of those who were fortunate to watch live and those that will enjoy the recording, when I say thank YOU!

What a great time.  I wish I could have stayed for more of it, but I got at least halfway through I think.  Family called, so I had to leave my "magic family".

I wanted to compliment you on the way you introduced some of the various controls.  When magicians think of "The Pass", they generally jump to visions of the Classic Pass, the Herrmann Pass, etc.  But the subject of passes is actually very broad based.  I like to think of it as any action which secretly cuts the deck.  Then you can get technical and divide that into categories, but when you boil it down to the nitty gritty, you're just cutting the cards.  

You showed a variety of ways to accomplish that which don't resemble a Classic Pass.  There is a lot to like about all of them.

I particularly like the Dribble Pass ideas you shared.  I use a Dribble Pass a lot and it works good for me because I tend to dribble the cards a lot when performing, sort of like a nervous tic almost and the audience is conditioned to it.  I don't make a fuss over it, but just do it every now and then.  And always while talking, making eye contact, etc.  Then when I need to do a pass, it blends in perfectly, they see nothing and they don't even think to look which is the more important component.

The move you show at around 1:55:00, known as the Marlo-Thompson Bluff Pass, can be found on Page 2 of Card Finesse, the first volume by Jon Racherbaumer.  You gave the proper credit, I'm just clarifying that it is in the first book.

I've used it for decades and it always flies.  Great move, and you demonstrated some really good ideas for it.

I'm still working my way through the video.  So much fun ahead!  
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John Carey

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJ


John, I think I speak for all of those who were fortunate to watch live and those that will enjoy the recording, when I say thank YOU!

What a great time.  I wish I could have stayed for more of it, but I got at least halfway through I think.  Family called, so I had to leave my "magic family".

I wanted to compliment you on the way you introduced some of the various controls.  When magicians think of "The Pass", they generally jump to visions of the Classic Pass, the Herrmann Pass, etc.  But the subject of passes is actually very broad based.  I like to think of it as any action which secretly cuts the deck.  Then you can get technical and divide that into categories, but when you boil it down to the nitty gritty, you're just cutting the cards.  

You showed a variety of ways to accomplish that which don't resemble a Classic Pass.  There is a lot to like about all of them.

I particularly like the Dribble Pass ideas you shared.  I use a Dribble Pass a lot and it works good for me because I tend to dribble the cards a lot when performing, sort of like a nervous tic almost and the audience is conditioned to it.  I don't make a fuss over it, but just do it every now and then.  And always while talking, making eye contact, etc.  Then when I need to do a pass, it blends in perfectly, they see nothing and they don't even think to look which is the more important component.

The move you show at around 1:55:00, known as the Marlo-Thompson Bluff Pass, can be found on Page 2 of Card Finesse, the first volume by Jon Racherbaumer.  You gave the proper credit, I'm just clarifying that it is in the first book.

I've used it for decades and it always flies.  Great move, and you demonstrated some really good ideas for it.

I'm still working my way through the video.  So much fun ahead!  
Thank you Ray!
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arthur stead

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Reply with quote  #4 

I was not able to attend live, but did purchase the video.  Haven’t started watching yet, but everything John Carey does is superb, so I’m sure it will be great!

But I wanted to touch on something RayJ said in his post.  You mentioned conditioning the audience to your habit of dribbling the cards from time to time.  And then, at the right time, using that repeated act to cover a sleight.  I LOVE those sorts of subtleties, and I think that’s brilliant!  

In a similar way, when I shuffle cards, I work on having the audience perceive my technique as somewhat casual, almost bordering on sloppy.  This makes it much easier to disguise in-jogged cards, pinkie breaks, etc.  And of course, like RayJ said, when a sleight or a move has to occur, it’s always done while talking & making eye contact.


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RayJ

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Originally Posted by arthur stead

I was not able to attend live, but did purchase the video.  Haven’t started watching yet, but everything John Carey does is superb, so I’m sure it will be great!

But I wanted to touch on something RayJ said in his post.  You mentioned conditioning the audience to your habit of dribbling the cards from time to time.  And then, at the right time, using that repeated act to cover a sleight.  I LOVE those sorts of subtleties, and I think that’s brilliant!  

In a similar way, when I shuffle cards, I work on having the audience perceive my technique as somewhat casual, almost bordering on sloppy.  This makes it much easier to disguise in-jogged cards, pinkie breaks, etc.  And of course, like RayJ said, when a sleight or a move has to occur, it’s always done while talking & making eye contact.



Good point Arthur.  Natural is as natural does.  Being natural doesn't mean uniformity.  I think if you condition your audience to the way YOU handle cards, you can then use that against them.  
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