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Waterman

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Reply with quote  #1 
Dai Vernon's More Inner Secrets of Card Magic... pg. 76

I have been using this effect for years and regret not always performing it for laymen.
It's a stunner...plain and simple.

Readers be fore-warned that a more than casual background of card magic is needed to pull off this classic. However, with the proper execution and "guts" required to get the predicted card into the spectators hand, one may truly claim to have the Holy Grail of card tricks using any deck available at the time of performance.

I recently performed it for a group of laymen using my own deck (marked) and found a 4 of a kind  based on the spectators choice of any card in the deck. The reactions were priceless.

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Waterman

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Reply with quote  #2 
I forgot to mention that the book which this effect can be found in was written by Lewis Ganson.
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #3 
     Check out my take-off on the idea, called Calculated Risk. It was in the original Close-Up Card Magic edition - and it's now in JAW DROPPERS.
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Waterman

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks for the suggestion Harry...
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Maigret

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Reply with quote  #5 
If you master a memorized deck, you are 75% ahead of every other magician for this particular trick.
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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #6 
     Not for me - I'm ahead of "every other magician" who "masters a memorized deck" because I use a borrowed, shuffled by spectator, deck. To each his own. (And, I can memorize a deck faster than anyone else I know!)
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Waterman

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maigret
If you master a memorized deck, you are 75% ahead of every other magician for this particular trick.


What makes the Trick That Cannot Be Explained worth learning is the versatility it provides...can be done with a borrowed deck...the spectator can shuffle the deck, even during the routine...the deck need never touch the magicians hands...opportunities for the magician to "think on his/her feet" during the performance.

I am amazed at the number of times the predicted card shows up in the most perfect position for a reveal where even knowledgeable magicians are left scratching their heads. 




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Harry Lorayne

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Reply with quote  #8 
   Exactly my point, Waterman.
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #9 
Eric Mead shares his excellent thoughts for building one's confidence and success with TTTCBE in his book A Tangled Web.
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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #10 
The first of Jeff McBride's Mystery Schools that I attended was held at the College of Mr Saint Vincent in the Bronx. There were lectures and workshops during the day. At night there was the Close-Up Cafe held in the student lounge until the wee hours of the morning. 

That first year I spent every night watching Eugene Burger hold court in the close up cafe performing The Trick That Can't Be Explained over and over and over again to everyone who came by and wanted to watch. 

Eugene had a deck shuffled. A card was selected and placed off to the side without anyone looking at it. And the process began to have the spectator select another card. Eugene took advantage of luck, he employed ploys to eliminate cards, etc. Every single time he came to an elegant conclusion and we were all making mental notes. 

Eugene's method differs from Dai Vernon's in that Dai wrote a prediction first. I prefer Eugene's method because a card is selected and left blind, where no one gets to see it until the end and it winds up being the mate of the second card. Doing it this was, a stacked deck or marked deck comes in handy for finding out the identity of the "unknown" card. I've performed this strolling both ways, with a set up Si Stebbins stack and a marked deck. The marked deck is better because you lose the stack when you allow the spectator to shuffle. 

Eugene had a unique way of finding out the identity of the first chosen card after a deck was shuffled. I discovered it during the second night and asked him about it. He told me, "Shhhhhh. No one is supposed to know about this." He said that perhaps some time down the road he'd lecture on it. I don't believe he ever did. But, thought I needed to mention this because he didn't resort to a stack or marked deck and if I remember correctly, did it with other people's decks if they requested. 
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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #11 
Robin mentioned Eric Mead's book 'The Tangled Web', this is indeed a great resource. Lewis Jones has some thoughts on the trick in his 'Encyclopedia of Impromptu Card Forces' too.

EvilDan has spoken of his experience with Eugene Burger and the trick with no explanation. I agree, Eugene is a master of this idea.

It is a winner and certainly keeps you on your toes... there are many different ways you can deal with this 'trick' but the main concept as ever is to entertain the audience.
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ShaunRobinson

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Reply with quote  #12 
Henry Evans' DVD - Opening Doors is worth your attention if TTTCBE is of interest to you.
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #13 
I just noticed that my one-line message recommending Eric Mead's book has received a "Thumbs-down" ... sorry I offended you, who-ever it was ... but hey, that's the kind of no-holds-barred, down-and-dirty, tell-it-like-it-is, shoot-from-the-hip, excessively-hyphenated kind of guy I am!

Seriously ... what the heck?  That must be the most innocuous thing I have ever posted!
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sjrwheeler

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Reply with quote  #14 

For a while I've played with Wayne Dobson's version of TTTCBE called Lucky Card. Its very easy to do, and easy to learn. 

I combined it with 2 other routines to create a 3 phased routine where I never need to touch the deck and each phase does allows me to do all of the work for the next phase. 

- It starts with me handing someone "my lucky card" to keep until the end. 
- Next someone shuffles the deck and chooses a card which they then cut into the deck.
- They spread the deck face up on the table and I look over it (secretly learning their card which is next to my key card and also memorising a force card for the next phase). I ask them to close the spread and then I name their card.  
- I offer to repeat, but suggest making it even more challenging. I talk them through a very fair "test conditions" process to force a card on themselves. Which they then completely fairly lose into the deck.
- Even though the card was forced I keep the procedure the same and get them to spread the deck. I pretend to look over it but actually I'm looking for the card which matches "my lucky card".
- I ask them to square up and then I name their card.
- Finally I remind them of "my lucky card" and ask them to spell "my lucky card" and deal the last card aside... The card they spell to matches my lucky card. 

I like how it brings the routine full circle, starting with my lucky card which most people forget about and then coming back to it at the end. 
I like that I never have to touch the deck... But most normal people cannot do a ribbon spread, so for those people I make a big deal of only touching the deck with one finger. But I'd love to work out how to still do it without touching the deck
I strongly dislike some of the outs for Lucky Card. And if I'm honest I strongly dislike spelling tricks of any kind. But people seem to really enjoy the ending, so I've stuck with it for now. 

I absolutely love it when I get a happy accident:
- Occasionally I've had someone select My Lucky Card during phase 1 or phase 2. This makes the routine perfect and I've been looking for ways to make this happen every time (or at least maximise the likelihood of this happening). 
- Occasionally I've had someone select my key card during phase 1. I increase the likelihood of this happening by asking them to think of a card before they spread through the deck to remove it, since otherwise it is unlikely that someone would choose the top card. 



Boris Wild also has a very nice version of TTTCBE

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Tom G

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Reply with quote  #15 
Hey Robin, also got a like, maybe a mistake on the thumbs down?
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom G
Hey Robin, also got a like, maybe a mistake on the thumbs down?


Maybe ... or maybe my comment about Mead's book has opened up a previously unsuspected deep divide within TMF.  So far the polls are showing the voters are split right down the middle.
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Rudy Tinoco

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Dawes


Maybe ... or maybe my comment about Mead's book has opened up a previously unsuspected deep divide within TMF.  So far the polls are showing the voters are split right down the middle.


I'm sure that the thumbs down was a mistake. I've done that before.

Tangled Web is great and his thoughts on the memorized deck were insightful.

Rudy

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Maigret

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom G
Hey Robin, also got a like, maybe a mistake on the thumbs down?

I don't understand when someone recommand a book (which is by the way a very good book) get a negative sign without any justification. At least, that person could give a reason.
So I gave a thumb up as a counterbalance.
I find anonymous thumbs down a little.... 

Excuse me for my bad English grammar. It is not my mother language.


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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudy Tinoco
I'm sure that the thumbs down was a mistake. I've done that before. Tangled Web is great and his thoughts on the memorized deck were insightful. Rudy


Hi Rudy

I know you're right - I'm just having a little bit of fun with the idea of getting a down-vote on something so noncontroversial    [smile]

Robin
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjrwheeler

For a while I've played with Wayne Dobson's version of TTTCBE called Lucky Card. Its very easy to do, and easy to learn. 

I combined it with 2 other routines to create a 3 phased routine where I never need to touch the deck and each phase does allows me to do all of the work for the next phase. 

...



Thank you so much for sharing this!  I really like it.
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Jeremy Salow

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Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Dawes
I just noticed that my one-line message recommending Eric Mead's book has received a "Thumbs-down" ... sorry I offended you, who-ever it was ... but hey, that's the kind of no-holds-barred, down-and-dirty, tell-it-like-it-is, shoot-from-the-hip, excessively-hyphenated kind of guy I am!

Seriously ... what the heck?  That must be the most innocuous thing I have ever posted!


Sorry Robin. I looked and saw that I must have accidentally hit the thumbs down button lol.
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #22 
No worries my friend [smile]
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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #23 
You can learn a bit about Eugene Burger's equivocal approach to the concept along with language choices by reading this old article from 1988.

https://www.chicagoreader.com/chicago/do-you-believe-in-magic/Content?oid=872956
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Socrates
You can learn a bit about Eugene Burger's equivocal approach to the concept along with language choices by reading this old article from 1988.

https://www.chicagoreader.com/chicago/do-you-believe-in-magic/Content?oid=872956


That is just about the best "outsider's" article about magic that I have ever read!  Thank you so much for posting the link.
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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #25 
No problem Robin,

I have read this article many times over the years, it is full of insight and therefore most thought-provoking.
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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #26 
I agree. Excellent article. The writer really captures a lot of detail. I wish I had a memory like that!

Mike
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alexandercrawford

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Reply with quote  #27 
Great article. As Mike says he seems to have captured incredible detail. I cna only presume he used a voice recorder.

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