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madjionicar.hr

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Reply with quote  #1 

Have You some good idea how to remember routine, sleights...I work only closeup (cards). Sometime happen I can not to remember some effects. 

ex. I need to remember 2nd card on the top or 28 cards on the bottom site...I´m not to old, but after 27 years active works, it´s to much informations.

Every idea is welcome.
best regards

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sjrwheeler

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Reply with quote  #2 
You could try to simplify your repertoire. Reduce the number of effects you do. Or remove some of the effects which involve lots of memorisation. 
Next you could devote more practice sessions to the effects you struggle to remember, when you feel like you have got these remembered quite well circulate in a different effect into your practice priority list but continue practicing the ones you feel like you've already memorised. 
The more you perform them the easier you'll be able to recall them. 
If you plan to perform, then work out which effects you'd like to perform, and make sure you have memorised those effects.
For all of your effects keep a small summary of the whole trick, the method, the setup, how you like to present it, etc. You could keep this in an evernote file and then access each trick from your phone or computer. So no matter where you are if you decide you want to practice something you haven't done for a while, just look it up in your file and revise it. 
Also you could video yourself performing the trick and explaining the trick. Then you can keep these videos on your phone, and when you want to revise you can watch a video reminding you of the details.
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MagiKen

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Reply with quote  #3 

Yes, nadjionicar.hr (Vladimir), age is not the problem (although that does not help either). I agree, the more you learn the more difficult it is to remember all of the steps in each complex effect. This seems especially true for card effects.  I think this is because they use and reuse so many similar methods in different orders to accomplish effects that range from similar to very different results. For this reason, among others, I do not do very many card tricks currently.  I have found my favorite arsenal and tend to stick with just those well-rehearsed set of effects.  Even then, on occasion, there are situational effects I perform less often (like Anniversary Waltz) for which I can easily mess-up the order of things. With experience I have recovered from the mistakes and arrived at the same conclusion by a round-about, more circuitous, route. This is not ideal, but it gets the job done.

As early as my teen years (I am a senior citizen now) I had a hard time recalling every step in what, back then, was a larger number of complex card effects. I finally came up with a method that worked for the kind of performance situations I was working back then.  Whether this will help you will depend on whether or not your current performance style will allow you to use this method.  Back then, I worked out of a standard sized briefcase. It would sit on the performance table or on a chair next to the table. Secured inside of the opened lid of the briefcase I had a system of charts for each card effect. I wrote them in a kind of magical cryptic shorthand using a bold easy to read black marker. In this way I could quickly review the steps before beginning. Should I need to do so, I could also glance over into my case, sitting open with its back to the audience, and use the "Cheat Sheet" to remind me of the next step.

If you do not work out of a case, work standing, or in a walk-around setting, or can't at least lay a cryptic note sheet on the table, then (and I have not personally tried this) maybe you could write your list on a blank faced card (one per effect) and have it hidden in you deck.

 

Of course, the best way is to practice daily all of your favorite complex card effects.  For those effects for which you continue to have difficulty in recalling the exact order of things, I recommend that you work on developing alternate handlings, or at the least, outs you can use to get back on track at the points where you know you typically forget and get off track.

If, despite your relatively young age, actual memory is the issue, rather than the issue being simply the complexity of the regular routine or set-up, then I recommend both using a memory building program (check out Harry Lorayne’s books on memory techniques and/or talk with him here on the forum) and also a memory boosting diet and regimen.

 

Such a regimen includes plenty of rest and aerobic exercise, a diet rich in B vitamins, high in dark fruits and berries, low in sugars and saturated fats and oils, avoiding alcohol, and other lifestyle changes, supplements, etc. you can easily discover online.  Reviewing or reading new materials while walking, and when appropriate reading aloud while walking, has been found to be of great value to many in retaining the information read.

If none of these methods work for you, you can always do one of these two things: 1) Trim your repertoire down to tricks you can do well or are willing to rehearse and to perform frequently enough that you will not forget them. In this way you will also not be being confused by the many tricks you will no longer be doing. And/or 2) Learn to "wing it."  That is to know moves and methods that allow you to make it up as you go to reach your goal. When you come up with something fantastic, make a note of it and perhaps put it into the (#1) do often category. Do expect some less than perfect experiences from time to time winging it, as you develop your new improvisational skill set. Build in or have ready lots of outs in advance to save the day.

If even these suggestions do not work for you, you may either want to contact your doctor to see if you have early onset Alzheimer's or another medical condition; or take up another hobby or avocation.  Become an illusion builder or learn to knit. LOL - only kidding. [biggrin]


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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #4 
Good advice above.

I might add a couple of thoughts: I like to create short videos that show any set up and then show a quick run through of the moves. They end up being less than three minutes each. They're small enough that I can put many on my phone. So I can review the trick quickly.

My pal Dan Fishman has a list of something like 80 to 100 card tricks he likes to perform. His methodology is to move through the list three or four tricks each day. He picks the next three or four in sequence and practices them. The next day he moves to a new set of three or four. 

Also, it's good to organize your repertoire into sets of three (Eugene Burger idea). When called upon to show some magic, you use one of the sets. Three is a good number for a quick show. You can always do another set of three if called for. But remember the maxim, "Less is more." I think that when you organize three tricks into a little show, they'll become more memorable in that context. In other words, it may be easier to remember the three tricks as a unit than it is if they're not organized into a set.

Mike
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sjrwheeler

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Reply with quote  #5 
I like the idea of organising them into sets of three. Thanks for sharing Mike
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madjionicar.hr

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Reply with quote  #6 

Thank You for good ideas. I agree with all.
I use my favorite show 30 minutes for events. Tricks order are not important because I adapt tricks for my audience currently. 

Course, we know some tricks are extremely powerful. 
When I returned from magicians conventions, festival, live lectures...too much informations. Can not to remember every sleight every pinky break. . . 
One month ago I returned from Dutch festival of Magic. Good think I bought DVDs from some lectures. Used LastPass software or Evernote can to write some global idea.

Maybe to create 3-4 standards favorite shows. Each durations 20 - 30 minutes.

All the best, and once again THANK YOU! 

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Michaelblue

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Reply with quote  #7 
Read one or two off Harry Lorayne's Memory books
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Robin Dawes

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Powers

...

Also, it's good to organize your repertoire into sets of three (Eugene Burger idea). When called upon to show some magic, you use one of the sets. Three is a good number for a quick show. You can always do another set of three if called for. But remember the maxim, "Less is more." I think that when you organize three tricks into a little show, they'll become more memorable in that context. In other words, it may be easier to remember the three tricks as a unit than it is if they're not organized into a set.

Mike


A useful idea I picked up from John Guastaferro is to give each set a name based on the first letters of the titles of the tricks.  So if your set of 3 consists of Play It Straight Triumph, Follow the Leader, CAAN then you need to make something memorable out of PFC ... the first thing that comes to my mind is Private First Class so I might create an image of a grizzled veteran from an Ernie Pyle drawing, with "PFC" on his helmet. 


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Mike Powers

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks for that tip Robin. Great idea.

Mike
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