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Mind Phantom

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Reply with quote  #1 
Mine can be found in Richard Busch's Peek Performance book using a ungimmicked paper backed book.

Sometimes I cannot remember the target words, so I don't do this much.

What say you?



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Bulla

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Reply with quote  #2 
I like Word in a Million by Nicholas Einhorn; very clever method.
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Evan S.

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Reply with quote  #3 
Meir Yedid's WOW book test is as simple as it gets. I'm not a book test expert, but this one works well for me.

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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #4 
Word in Millions pre-dates Nicholas of course, but he and Mark Mason made a good version of it.

Problem with book tests is that they are so many of them on the market and they are exposed all over the web.

Had a few favorites over the years before they were everywhere, Larry Becker's Flashback was a particular favorite back in the day but I've used others.

I think going back to magazine tests may be the way to go, not as many of them about, lol.

For a book test, I think you need a different presentational spin on it these days.

I used the Sherlock Holmes FB with a semi humorous mediumistic presentation. That is described again in the re-release of "Best of Mindful Mentalism", available here: http://www.thebookpatch.com/BookStore/the-best-of-mindful-mentalism/1a7f9ae0-ba9c-4db9-8eda-420037e9e85a    Though on my Mind Stuff DVD I did the presentation without the Holmes book.

In "Mentalism With Cards " I had a version of Stewart James 1984 book test that I liked. 

At one point I used to combine a couple of the versions of Flashback and then finish with a word selected from an invisible book, the climax of course seeming to suggest the  books had really been irrelevant other than providing a wider choice of words. 

Used Al Smith's "Economicon" for a while too, and Sam Schwartz's The Hidden Force astrology book test (perhaps the most gaffed book ever, lol, combined a couple of routines from that).

Although I've not used it, I must admit to REALLY liking a Jeff Stone book test presentation themed around the pen being mightier than the sword that appears in his book 793.8. 

I don't really think there is a best book test, they are all just tools to use.

p.s. I used WOW when if first came out as well, and the Terri Rogers one. I may be cured of book test fever now. 
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Evan S.

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Reply with quote  #5 
Speaking of magazine tests, check out Steve Fearson's Amagazing. Very clever method!
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #6 

There is a little known book test in Greer Marechal's great book, "Magic For The Millions" which is also described in a more streamlined version in Bruce Elliott's "Magic: 100 New Tricks".

It is based on sheer bluff and wordplay. What I like about it is that you do not have to have the spectator on stage. I think this makes a nice change in a mental act.

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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hoy Book Test. - it's my holy grail and the only one I use if I use one. 

I have owned a few versions of WOW. I have the MOABT. 
I still like Hoy the best. 
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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EVILDAN
Hoy Book Test. - it's my holy grail and the only one I use if I use one. 

I have owned a few versions of WOW. I have the MOABT. 
I still like Hoy the best. 


Sadly, exposed on YouTube here but probably elsewhere also.



Yes, I've used it myself in the past, but I wouldn't now. Also liked a not so impromptu variant on it by Phantini.

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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blathermist


Incidentally, anybody seen this:

https://jackshalom.net/2016/05/08/mystic-descendant-the-offering/



I went looking for it and found this:
http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/mystic-descendant/156319/

Maybe is was the beer I was destined to find....
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Nolan

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Reply with quote  #10 
I like Chris Philpott's Tossed Out Book Test. I have a presentation about Orson Welles that works nicely with it [smile]
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eusbanger

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Reply with quote  #11 
i didn't ever try a book test, I really don't get the point of using them and why are so popular

for me, is something extrange to ask to peek a word from a book instead of just thought of one by myself

Maybe I need to try one...
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EVILDAN

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Reply with quote  #12 
In the past I didn't use book tests because, just like eusbanger, why pick the first word off of a page instead of just thinking of any word.

Now I'll add it in if I feel the need. But it now makes sense in the structure of my show.
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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eusbanger
i didn't ever try a book test, I really don't get the point of using them and why are so popular

for me, is something extrange to ask to peek a word from a book instead of just thought of one by myself

Maybe I need to try one...


With the right justification, anything can make sense.

Usually with  books the idea is to give a random choice of word/words  which cannot have in any way been suggested psychologically. Also, most people don't have a large vocabulary so books offer a wider choice of words - which is why a dictionary is often a good choice of word to use. You'll notice in my earlier post I talked about in the past combining some book tests and concluding with an INVISIBLE book someone selected a word from.

But occasionally you are not just revealing a word, you might be describing a paragraph someone has read, drawing a picture someone is looking at etc. 

Book tests actually go back historically to the world of spirit mediums. A spirit message might direct someone to a book and a page within where there was some relevant information.

Why do so many people do them? Because now there are so many being SOLD. And they are easy to do Let's face it, the average mental act probably includes the following:

Book Test
Design duplication
metal bend
pk touch
prediction effect







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Nolan

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Reply with quote  #14 

What initially worked for me when I started using book tests was to make the book unimportant using all those practical presentational strategies where you act as though any book could be used and it's just a handy way of having a word placed in someone's head.

Then a few years ago I was asked to introduce a screening of the brilliant Orson Welles movie "F For Fake" by talking about Orson's love of magic and doing a short performance. It just happens that every book used in the Tossed Out Book Test was important to Orson's life in one way or another so by using that I can talk about his live and his passion for magic then end with a tribute to him. The routine I use has a built in moment where it appears things have gone awry for me and I get to say, "Well, of course I'm not as good as Welles.... let me think... what would Orson have done." Then I recover of course. 

What I'm saying is, my reasons are now theatrical rather than practical and that, for me, feels much better. I've performed the routine at a number of cinemas showing Orson's movies and at screenings of the recent documentary "Magician: The Astonishing Life and Work of Orson Welles" and it's always played really well for that kind of crowd.

Here's a clip of Orson doing his thing with a pile of books...

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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #15 
I remember Paul Daniels doing several book tests over the years, one in particular was having a personality go to the British library while Paul remained in the studio at the BBC.  The person walked around the library at random, finally stopping and picking a random book off the shelf. They opened the book anywhere they liked and picked a word on the page. Paul was able to reveal the word selected.

That's sizing up the book test plot somewhat. [smile]
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mark lewis

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Reply with quote  #16 
The man who without question created the biggest sensation with the book test was Chan Canasta. The entire British public would be talking about it. And a very brazen method too.
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Nachtzehrer

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Reply with quote  #17 
The Alain Nu book test (that i dont recall the name) can be done impromptu with any book.

You can even go to a library ask someone to pick a book and do it with that book.

It does involve 2 peeks but they are done in a way that arouses absolutly no suspection

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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #18 
Here's the latest..
http://www.alakazam.co.uk/product-All-About-Eve-By-Steve-Dela.html
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Rc4mag

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Reply with quote  #19 
I really like Nathan Kranzo's "Coolest Book Test Ever".  That is the title, not a comment by me. It simpifies doing Max Maven's Autotome which I used to do.

For a book test I use in a Magic act vs. Mentalism show, I like the Dracula Book test. I use this not in a Mentalism set because of the patter I use and the Osterlind finale using a dollar store dictionary. 
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Luis Sirgado

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Reply with quote  #20 
My favorite book test in the moment uses something that I saw in a dvd from haim goldenberg and that I worked and I ended up changing so that I can use four books and whatever the spectator choice I always guess the word they are thinking.
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Deckster

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Reply with quote  #21 
My favorite would be MOABT. The MOABT is amazing. The new version is awesome. It looks real. I don't have it, but wish I did. Because it is so easy Annemann's "Between the Lines" is one I've used and like because it can quickly be set up with different books  "Creations" by Sam Schwartz is cool, but the book is funky. I have "Famous Quotations" by Steve Dusheck and that one is so funny and is a good challenge exercise in audience management.

My thinking is that if you have multiple tests available then coupled with magicians' choice, a spectator can "literally" choose from many books and the effect can be repeated.
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Mark Goldstein

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Reply with quote  #22 
MOABT style - I use Glance most often. Tremendous magazine style with a slight improvement from my MOABT book( in my opinion). Incandescence (Phillpot) situational as it is a collection of love poems. Gives a slightly added emotional touch.

Flashback style - Europe Travel on $50 / Day (Becker and Earle) multiple types of reveals. Great book.

Descriptive style ( the target paragraph is described accurately rather than a word - can seem most psychic) Ne Plus Ultra. Situationally (Spooky) Luna.

Ungimmicked but using Harry's teachings to master - Cassidy's magazine test

Any book Any time - Marc Paul's AAA
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Mark Goldstein

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Reply with quote  #23 
Guess that makes me a book test freak.
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Mark Goldstein

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Reply with quote  #24 
I love the Hoy - but haven't used it. A future project to construct.
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Danzs

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Reply with quote  #25 
I love A word in a Million. Another one I like but would never have the guts to do is Max Maven's Fearless book test.
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Socrates

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Reply with quote  #26 
The book-test can be an interesting thing to do in a bookshop, library or at someone's house. On stage, or as part of a show it is just another trick.

Look into Lewis Jones, Richard Busch, Hoy, Canasta etc. Also worth looking at progressive anagrams too.

Think about how to make it relevant, and fitting to the situation. Design a good script/presentation and you'll have something unique.

Othewise it'll just be another trick, and if that is the case then you may as well stick to card, or coin tricks.
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hostlerj

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Reply with quote  #27 
Harvey Berg's Ne Plus Ultra is my fav. Three "common" paperbacks... they choose one, flip to any page and silently read a passage. The performer reveals specific details, essentially recapping the passage. It's that direct, and very easy.
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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Socrates
On stage, or as part of a show it is just another trick.


Maybe in a magic show, but if the mentalist is doing his job it shouldn't be accepted as 'just another trick'.
But as I said earlier, there are too many book tests and too many people doing them, even children's entertainers.
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Paul Hallas

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Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blathermist


Tut tut Paul. You know as well as I do that, just as there can never too many card tyricks, there can never be too many book tests.
[smile]


Ok I'll take that back. I'll combine the next book test I do  with a wallet because you can never get too many of those either [smile]

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Ben Blau

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Reply with quote  #30 
I have yet to see a book test I like more than "Autome". I don't know why Max's gem of a book test doesn't get more attention. I think it's fabulous.
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tommyellison

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Reply with quote  #31 
Thinking out loud here....

Combining a Book test, e.g., Hoy and a Magic Square into one routine.....

Ok.

Go!

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Gareth

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Reply with quote  #32 
Recently went to a show in Sydney, Bruce Glen, the Gentleman Magician, (http://www.gentlemanmagician.com.au) a similar set-up as Steve Cohen but the Royal Automobile Club of Australia rather than Waldorf Astoria NY/Chicago. 

Was asked up to assist with something. It was a book-test but my curiosity as a spectator was far exceeded by my magic-brain-cogs whirring away mixed with a childlike excitement having been called up on stage. I was so busy trying to watch everything he was doing and  trying to follow instructions, I forgot the words I was supposed to remember!. Very embarassing. I remembered one word and Bruce did very well to recover things. [eek]

As with all situations there is a lesson. It gave me an insight into the spectators world. How important audience/spectator management is.

Gareth
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Jake07712

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Reply with quote  #33 
I really like Glance a lot. The use of a couple of Time magazines makes the whole thing look so innocent.
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Reply with quote  #34 
I'll second Max's Autome, natural book tests are the bomb because they look like real books! A common problem with book tests is they don't. I also really like Docc's Wizards Manual which is also a real book and has an incredibly strong end.
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marc_carrion

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Reply with quote  #35 
Speaking about 'real' looking books... since there are a lots of books in the public domain, and given how easy is to self-publish nowadays, has anyone thought about getting some books from the public domain, modify them for book test purposes, design some covers, and get amazon to print them on demand? they just print a copy when a copy is sold. I think it should be fairly easy to create 'real' looking books nowadays. 
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Paul

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Reply with quote  #36 
I like the Bookless Test from Colin McCleods Penguin Lecture. Im currently working on my own version of a book test with a magical twist at the end, I have a gut feeling its probably been done before as the idea came to my head too easily
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Nathan_himself

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Reply with quote  #37 
My favorite book test is Colin McLeod's Bookless Test. It's simple, easy, and completely fooling if done correctly. I highly suggest this if you are looking for something that looks like real mind reading.
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Chi Han

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Reply with quote  #38 
I don't know if anyone has said this, but I'm a big fan of Marc Paul's AAA book test. I enjoy combining it with various other psuedo memory ones, but I must confess it has been some months since I have done any 'real' mentalism.
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